Lavender Legacies Guide: United States: California

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AIDS History Project
The Bisexual Archives
California State University, Northridge
Exodus Trust Archives of Erotology
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society
June L. Mazer Lesbian Archives
Lambda Archives of San Diego
Lavender Library, Archives and Cultural Exchange
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Religious Archives Network (LGBTRAN)
Oakland Museum of California
ONE Archives at the University of Southern California Libraries
The OUTWords Archives
San Francisco Performing Arts Library and Museum
San Francisco Public Library
San Jose State University
Stanford University, Green Library
University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Los Angeles
University of California, Los Angeles - Chicano Studies Resource Center
Women's Resource Center

AIDS History Project
Location: University of California San Francisco Library
and Center for Knowledge Management
Archives and Special Collections
AIDS History Project
530 Parnassus Ave.
San Francisco, CA 94123-0840
Phone: (415) 476-8112
Contact: Lisa Mix, Manager, Archives and Special Collections
Email: archives-info@library.ucsf.edu
Internet addresshttp://www.library.ucsf.edu/collres/archives/
Hours: Tue-Wed, by appointment only.
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
The AIDS History Project (AHP) is a collaboration of historians, archivists, AIDS activists, and others, to preserve the history of the AIDS epidemic in San Francisco. The current phase is sponsored by the University of California, Library and Center for Knowledge Management, Archives and Special Collections. Cooperating partners in the project include the San Francisco Public Library and the Gay and Lesbian Historical Society of Northern California. These institutions, along with UCSF, will preserve and maintain the materials collected as a result of this phase of the project.
The primary objective of this phase of the AIDS History Project is to secure documentation of the response to the AIDS crisis in the city of San Francisco during the first thirteen years, particularly the development and effect of community based organizations and activist coalitions. It is our intent to acquire, arrange, and describe the most fertile and most vulnerable records from these agencies, and deposit them in local cooperating repositories open to all researchers. In addition, AHP encourages preservation of records that cannot be accessioned during the project's lifetime. Additional phases of the AIDS History Project are currently being considered. A natural area in which the AIDS History Project could expand is documentation of the community research effort.
Information about holdings
Manuscripts: yes
Organizational records: yes
Printed material: yes
Objects/ephemera: yes
Film/Video/Sound: yes
Photographs: yes
Other holdings/notes: 132.5 cubic ft. including items marked above.

 

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
The AIDS History Project spans the first 13 years of the AIDS epidemic, ca.1981-1994, within the San Francisco Bay Area.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Organizations: San Francisco Department of Public Health, AIDS Office (at SFPL), AIDS Treatment News, AIDS Service Providers Association, Bay Area HIV Support & Education Services, GAPA Community HIV Project, Healing Alternatives Foundation, Mobilization Against AIDS, Multicultural Training Resource Center, National Lawyers Guild, National Task Force on AIDS Prevention, San Francisco AIDS Foundation, San Francisco General Hospital AIDS Program, Third World AIDS Advisory Task Force, Women's AIDS Network, AIDS/ARC Vigil Records (at GLHS), AIDS Healing Alliance (at GLHS), and ACT-UP San Francisco (at GLHS).
Individuals (indirectly documented): Sandra Hernandez, M.D.; Paul Volberding, M.D.; Constance Woofsy, M.D.; and John Ziegler, M. D.
Collecting interests
Additional phases of the AIDS History Project are currently being considered. A natural area in which the AIDS History Project could expand is documentation of the community research effort.
Use requirements
[None noted.]

Comments about access/use:
Certain categories of documentation carry restrictions on access. Certain researchers are required to pay reading room and other fees.
Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, Internet reference (email/web), and loan agreements for exhibits.

Other services/notes:
Special services associated with the reproduction and use of rare and unique materials.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Finding aids exist for all of the AIDS History Project Collections and are available in the department and online through our web site. MARC records available in the UCSF catalog and MELVYL (UC system-wide catalog).
News about collections
Collection updates will be available on the web site.
 
 

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The Bisexual Archives
Address: c/o Gay and Lesbian Historical Society of San Diego
P.O. Box 40389
San Diego, CA 92164
Phone: (619) 260-1522 Fax: (619) 260-1522
Contact: Sharon Parker, Board President; Dennis Fiordaliso, Board Treasurer
Internet address:   http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~clgoyne/lghssd/bisexualarch.html
Hours: Sun: 11 am - 3 pm, and by appointment. Closed holiday weekends.
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
Founded by Fritz Klein and Regina Reinhardt in 1996, the Bisexual Archives is housed and mentored by the Lesbian and Gay Historical Society of San Diego.
Information about holdings
Manuscripts: 2 ft.
Organizational records: 1 ft.
Printed material: 5 ft.
Clippings/vertical files: 1 ft.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Regina Reinhardt (Collection #96-1), Fritz Klein (Collection #96-2).
Collecting interests
Any period or region.
Use requirements
Unrestricted.
Services
Research space, copying, and audiovisual facilities.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
There is a collection list.
News about collections
Newsletter of the Lesbian and Gay Historical Society of San Diego.
 
 

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California State University, Northridge
Location: Special Collections/Archives
University Library
18111 Nordhoff St.
Northridge, CA 91330-8326
Phone: (818) 677-2597 Fax: (818) 677-2676
Contact: Tony Gardner, Curator Special Collections and Archives
Email: tony.gardner@csun.edu
Internet address: http://library.csun.edu/spcoll/hbspcoll.html
Hours: Mon-Fri: 9 am - 4:30 pm
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
The Human Sexuality Collection was established in 1973 with the acquisition of the Vern and Bonnie Bullough Collection on Human Sexuality by the University Library. It supports the research and instructional interests of students and faculty and the activities of the Center for Sex Research on campus.
Information about holdings
Printed material: 500 titles

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
All time periods and geographical regions.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Periodicals from the 1960s and 1970s.
Collecting interests
All areas of human sexuality
Use requirements
Processed and cataloged material open to all researchers.
Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, exhibitions, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, Internet reference (email/web), and loan agreements for exhibits.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
All processed materials are cataloged online through OCLC.

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Exodus Trust Archives of Erotology
1523 Franklin Street
San Francisco, CA 94109
Phone: (415) 928-1133
Contact: Ted McIlvenna
Email: drted@iashs.edu
Internet address: http://www.iashs.edu
Collecting areas: Twenty six specialty libraries which include books, art, film, erotic memorabilia, manuscripts and dissertations.

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Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Historical Society
Archives: 989 Market St., Lower Level
San Francisco, CA 94103
Museum: 4127 18th Street,
San Francisco, CA 94114 
Phone: (415) 777-5455 Fax: (415) 777-5576 

Email: reference@glbthistory.org
Internet address:  http://www.glbthistory.org
Hours: Archives access is by appointment
Wheelchair Access: yes

History
Founded in 1985, the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender (GLBT) Historical Society is recognized internationally as a leader in the field of LGBTQ public history. Our operations are centered around two sites: our GLBT Historical Society Museum, located since 2011 in the heart of San Francisco’s Castro neighborhood; and our Dr. John P. De Cecco Archives and Research Center, open to researchers in the Mid-Market district.

Information about holdings
The Dr. John P. De Cecco Archives & Special Collections of the GLBT Historical Society are among the largest and most extensive holdings in the world of materials pertaining to LGBTQ people, occupying more than 3,500 linear feet of storage and including over 900 collections. Materials include: personal papers, periodicals, oral histories, works of art and artifacts, photographs, audiovisual recordings, and organizational records. These collections include unpublished material such as letters, diaries and scrapbooks documenting the lives of both ordinary people and community leaders. They also include the records of many community organizations, businesses and political campaigns.

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
Predominantly Northern California, all time periods, but the vast majority is post-WWII. The collections are especially rich in material from the San Francisco Bay Area.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, Daughters of Bilitis, Don Lucas, Mattachine Society, Council on Religion and the Homosexual, Community United Against Violence, San Francisco Women's Building, Louis Sullivan, Leonard Matlovich, Maggi Rubenstein, Crawford Barton, Finocchio's memorabilia, many collections documenting AIDS activism and other queer activism. This is just a sampling of the many collections available at the GLBT Historical Society.

Collecting interests 
The GLBTHS Dr. John P. De Cecco Archives and Special Collections (GLBTHS-ASC) focuses on LGBTQ life, particularly in the San Francisco Bay Area and Northern California. Current collection strengths include the history of gay liberation and LGBTQ movements from the 1950s to the 2000s; lesbian and gay life prior to the 1970s; the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic; the social, political, and cultural history of gay men, lesbians, and transgender people; queer periodicals and ephemera; and LGBTQ art and performance materials. Collections include personal papers, publications, organizational records, diaries, scrapbooks, photographs, erotica, audiovisual recordings, artifacts, oral histories, and works of art.

GLBTHS-ASC is happy to consider new donations that support the mission of GLBTHS. We are interested in material that further develops our existing collection strengths and material that documents underrepresented areas. We are particularly interested in material about: LGBTQ life prior to the 1970s; LGBTQ people of color; Transgender and intersex history, individuals, and organizations; Underserved and underrepresented LGBTQ communities, such as people with disabilities, low-income individuals and those experiencing homelessness; Lesbians and bisexual women and men; LGBTQ community-based organizations, including those related to health, faith, politics, and education.

Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, exhibitions, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, Internet reference (email/web), and loan agreements for exhibits.

Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Finding aids are available along with a searchable catalog of collections, periodicals, and oral histories. Selected digital collections are also available. 

News about collections
There is a newsletter highlighting collections and articles on queer history. The Historical Society website is updated regularly.

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June L. Mazer Lesbian Archives
Location: 626 N. Robertson Blvd.
West Hollywood, CA 90069
Phone: (310) 659-2478 Fax: (310) 659-2478
Contact: Angela Brinskele
Email: mazerarchives@earthlink.net
Internet address:  http://www.mazerlesbianarchives.org
Hours: Tues 12- 3 pm; First Sunday of the month Noon-5pm Also by appointment.
Wheelchair Access: no
History
The collection was founded in 1981 in Oakland as the West Coast Lesbian Collections. In 1987 the collection moved to Southern California, under the auspices of the Connexxus Women's Center-Centro de Mujeres, and was subsequently named for its first coordinator's partner: community activist and collection supporter June L. Mazer. Since the dissolution of Connexxus in 1990, the Mazer Collection has not been associated with any other institution or organization.
Information about holdings
Manuscripts: 151 ft. personal and organizational papers
Printed material: 4,000 books; 1,000 periodical titles
Clippings/vertical files: 20 4-drawer filing cabinets (clippings, fliers, etc.)
Objects/ephemera: 4 small boxes (games, matchbook covers, etc.), and mugs, small statues, etc. on display
Film/Video/Sound: 24 ft. videos; 24 ft. records; 200 audiotapes
Photographs: 4 ft.
Other holdings/notes: 40 1940s-60s baseball/softball uniforms; ca.200 posters and other art objects; 18.5 ft. boxes of t-shirts; 20 frames (mostly 12 in. x 16 in.) of buttons.

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
Primarily United States, 1940s to the present, with a major emphasis on the West Coast.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Feminist and lesbian-feminist material; Feminist Economic Network; Diana Press; other lesbian/women's publications such as Broomstick, and Telewoman; OLOC (Old Lesbians Organizing for Change).
Collecting interests
Anything lesbian-related, with an emphasis on letters, diaries/journals, unpublished personal and organizational papers, photos, home movies, periodicals, Lesbian ephemera, and pre-1970 books from the western United States.
Use requirements
On-site use only.

Comments about access/use:
Access to some material is restricted due to donor request or fragility of the material. Visitors should call to confirm they are open.
Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, and loan agreements for exhibits.

Other services/notes:
Web page, off-site exhibits at events, cultural/educational programs and events, slide shows, speakers, and newsletter.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
In the process of choosing cataloging (MARC-compatible) software that will make information available online. The majority of books, records and tapes are cataloged in a database. The periodicals are listed, by issue, in notebooks.
News about collections
Semi-annual newsletter and web page.

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Lambda Archives of San Diego
Address: P.O. Box 40389
San Diego, CA 92164
Phone: (619) 260-1522 Fax: (619) 260-1522
Contact: Frank Nobilletti, Board President, 2006
Internet http://LambdaArchives.org

Hours: Sun: 11 am - 3 pm, and by appointment. Closed holiday weekends.
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
The society was founded in December of 1987 by Jess Jessop and other San Diego gay and lesbian activists as the Lesbian and Gay Archives. There were no known predecessors in San Diego, and it is not associated with any other institutions or organizations.
Holdings summary
The holdings mostly document the San Diego region (there is some material from Baja California), 1960 to the present. Some material dates from the 1940s and 1950s.
Military: Bridge Wilson (5 ft.), Perry Watkins (.5 ft.), Jim Woodward (3 ft.), and Gary Rees (.33 ft.).
Politics: Chris Kehoe (11 ft.), and Neil Goode (2 ft.).
Organizations: Save Our Teachers - No on 64 (.5 ft.), AIDS Project (96.5 ft), Gay Academic Union [through 1984] (14 ft.), The [Gay and Lesbian] Center (1.5 ft.), Lesbian and Gay Historical Society (4 ft.).
Local and Miscellaneous: Jess Jessop (5 ft.), Bernie Michels (3 ft.), Bruce Kamerling (.33 ft.), Albert Bell (4 ft.), and Steven Zeeland (1.5 ft.).
The breakdown by format is: 55 ft. of manuscripts, 37 ft. of organizational records, 100 ft. of printed material (59 ft. non-local, 40 ft. local), 12 ft. of vertical files, thousands of ephemeral items, 16 ft. of video, 13 ft. of audio, and 14 ft. of photographs.
Collecting interests
Emphasis on the history and activities of LGBT people in the San Diego County/Tijuana (Baja, CA, Norte, Mexico) region. Also includes information on LGBT culture worldwide.
Use requirements
Open to the public; a few collections have restrictions.
Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, exhibitions, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, and loan agreements for exhibits.

Other services/notes:
Only minimal A/V and phone reference is available. Mostly only copies are allowed out for exhibit loan.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Lists of books, periodicals, and manuscript collections are available. Clippings and vertical files are organized by our own authority list. Finding aids available to a small number of manuscript collections. Video and flat files are currently being cataloged.
News about collections
The newsletter lists recent donations.

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Lavender Library, Archives and Cultural Exchange
Location: 1414 21st Street
Sacramento, CA 95815
Phone: (916) 492-0558 
Contact: Michael Colby
E-mail: info@lavenderlibrary.org
Internet Address: http://www.lavenderlibrary.org

Hours: Thursdays 7-9 p.m.; Friday 6-8 p.m.; Saturday 12-6 p.m.; Sunday 12-6 p.m.

Wheelchair Accessible: yes

History:

Incorporated as a 501(c)3 independent California non-profit organization on October 6, 1998, LLACE first opened its doors to the public in January of 1999. In October of 2000, it moved to its current, larger location. LLACE was also instrumental in the first ever LGBT exhibit in the California State Capitol in June of 2002.

Information about Holdings:
Manuscript material: 2 cubic feet
Organizational records: 5 cubic feet
Photographs: 1 cubic foot
Books: 5,000
Journals: 60 cubic feet
Microfilm: 9 reels
Clippings or vertical files: 4 drawers
Objects and ephemera: 1 cubic foot
Costumes and props: 4 cubic feet

Video and DVD: 300 titles

Time period/geographical regions documented:
Holdings cover the greater Sacramento area from circa the 1970's to the present

Significant people/organizations/subjects covered:
Le Theater Lesbien, Court of the Great Northwest Imperial Empire (drag court), Sacramento Gay and Lesbian International Film Festival, and River City Business Association.

Collecting Interests:
LLACE accepts donations which fit into our collection policy on a regular basis. We accept books, periodicals, videos, sound recordings, manuscripts, ephemera, posters, letters, etc. The collection policy of LLACE reflects our mission, which is to collect, preserve and celebrate the history and culture of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community, with special emphasis on the community in the Sacramento area. While our emphasis is on LGBT material, there are times when there is a need to collect material that is not specifically LGBT in content (e.g. general reference works, feminist material, spirituality, self-help). Since material considered erotic is an expression of our community, we will collect erotic material.

Access and Use:
On-site use of the material is open to the public. Checkout of circulating (non-archival) materials requires an annual donation, either monetary or in volunteer hours.

Services:
Research space, reference assistance, photocopier, telephone reference, VCR and DVD player, will loan materials for exhibit.

Indices to the collection:
Books and videos are cataloged in a MARC database. Periodical holdings are reflected in CatalogQ (http://www.catalogq.net). Lists of all materials held appear on the website.

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Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Religious Archives Network (LGBTRAN)

Address: c/o Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies in Religion and Ministry 
1798 Scenic Avenue 
Berkeley, CA 94709
Phone: (773) 316-8892
Contact: Mark Bowman
Email: info@lgbtran.org
Internet address: http://www.lgbtran.org

Collecting areas: The LGBTRAN can best be viewed as a "virtual" archives. We serve as a resource for LGBT religious leaders and groups on determining how to preserve their historical records. we then provide an information clearinghouse for these archival collections in a central electronic directory for the use of historians, researchers and other interested persons. Extensive information on the history of LGBT religious movements is available on our web site. This group's overarching purpose is to ensure the preservation and accessibility of the voices and experiences of LGBT religious leaders and organizations.

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Oakland Museum of California
Location: 1000 Oak St.
Oakland, CA 94607-4892
Phone: (510) 238-3842 Fax: (510) 238-6579
Contact:Aimee Klask
Email: aklask@museumca.org
Internet address:   http://www.museumca.org
Hours: Thu: 1-4 pm
Wheelchair Access: Museum: yes; Museum on Line section (archives, 2nd floor): no.
History
The Oakland Public Museum was founded in 1910 and joined with the Snow Museum and Municipal Art Gallery to form the Oakland Museum in 1969. The name changed ca.1994 to the Oakland Museum of California.
Information about holdings
Printed material: 16 items
Objects/ephemera: 6 items
Film/Video/Sound: 1 sound recording; 1 video.
Photographs: 1 photo
Other holdings/notes: 24 garments and accessories re: [drag] performances of Jose Sarria and Lester Lamont, 6 posters, 2 comic books.

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
San Francisco Bay Area, 1930s to 1990s.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Jose Sarria, Lester Lamont.
Collecting interests
Keeping with the museum's California theme, we have a collection of costumes from the legendary drag performer Jose Sarria and material from the annual San Francisco Lesbain, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Pride Parade. In addition, we are currently collecting artifacts from the queer community in California.
Use requirements
[None noted.]
Services
Research space, copying, exhibitions, reference assistance on site, and loan agreements for exhibits.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Collections on Museum's database: ARGUS.
News about collections
No information is sent out; however, new material appears on our ARGUS system.

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ONE Archives at the USC Libraries
Location: 909 West Adams Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90007
Phone: (213) 821-12771 

Fax: 213-741-0220

E-mail: AskONE@usc.edu

Internet Address: http://www.one.usc.edu

Contacts: Joseph R. Hawkins, Ph.D, Executive Director

History: Several members of the Mattachine Society, including educator and activist W. Dorr Legg, met to discuss creating a magazine for homosexuals. In November 1952 they formed ONE Inc. and in January 1953 published the first issue of ONE Magazine, which would become the first widely distributed publication for homosexuals in the United States. The magazine featured articles, editorials, short stories, book reviews, and letters to the editor.

Kepner, A frequent contributor to ONE Magazine, along with Legg and Dr. Thomas M. Merritt, went on to found the ONE Institute, the educational arm of ONE Inc. that conducted seminars and published a journal. While ONE Magazine ceased publication in 1967, under Legg’s guidance the Institute continued to advocate and educate, eventually issuing advanced degrees in “Homophile Studies.”

In 1971, Kepner named his collection, then housed in his rented Hollywood apartment, the Western Gay Archives. His archives would later move to a storefront space in Hollywood, becoming the National Gay Archives, and later, the International Gay & Lesbian Archives, to reflect the growing scope of the collections.

In 1994, Kepner’s archives merged with the ONE Institute, and in 2000 moved to its current location provided by the University of Southern California. The archives would later be renamed ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives. In October 2010, the collections at ONE Archives became a part of the USC Libraries system. Today, ONE Archives is the oldest continuing LGBTQ organization in the United States and the largest repository of LGBTQ materials in the world.

Mission Statement: ONE Institute & Archives honors the past, celebrated the present, and enriches the future of all lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people. We foster acceptance of sexual and gender diversity by supporting education and research about our heritage and experience worldwide. ONE Institute & Archives is dedicated to collecting, preserving, documenting, studying, and communicating our history, our challenges, and our aspirations.

Information about holdings:
1.Manuscript material (personal papers):
Approx. 250 collections. 2000 linear feet http://www.oac.cdlib.org/institutions/ONE+National+Gay+and+Lesbian+Archives
2. Film, video, or sound:
4000 videos/film; 1000 audio tapes
3. Organization's records:
150 linear feet http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt7290389h/
4. Photographs: 500,000 items
5. Printed (books, journals, etc.): 30,000 book volumes; 7000 periodical titles.
6. Clippings or vertical files:
Kepner Research Collection file, 500 linear feet
8. Objects and ephemera: 100 linear feet
9. Other: (POSTERS/ART WORKS) 5000 pieces
10. What specific time period(s) and geographical region(s) do the holdings cover?
1850-2010. Los Angeles, California, United States, international.
11. What significant people, organizations and subjects are documented in the material?
Pre-Stonewall Gay America and Los Angeles, AIDS, Jim Kepner, Dorr Legg, Jeanne Cordova, Morris Kight, ONE Magazine, ONE Inc., Betty Berzon, Harry Hay, Laud Humphreys, gay performing arts and many other topics.

 

Summary: Archival/Photograph Collections are selected for preservation in the ONE Archives primarily because of their historical research value to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered people. Historical collections and manuscripts include memorabilia, records, printed documents, photographic images, maps, graphic materials, and other historically significant materials in other physical and electronic forms. Selected collections include: ONE, Inc./ONE Magazine Records the Jim Kepner Collection (writer, activist, archivist), Dorr Legg Papers, Harry Hay Papers, Morris Kight Collection, Dignity USA Records, the Mattachine Society Records, Betty Berzon Papers, the Performing Arts Collection, AIDS History Project Collection, Lesbian Legacy Collection, the Veterans’ Council for American Rights & Equality Records, Gay Sunshine Press (publisher), 1987 March on Washington Collections, the Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center Los Angeles Archives, Pat Rocco Papers (photographer and activist), Hal Call (early activist), and Rick Sanford (writer); Joseph Carrier Collection (anthropologist), Jeanne Cordova Papers and Photographs, Laud Humphreys Papers (sociologist), Judd Marmor Papers (psychiatrist), the James White Review (literary magazine), William Christian Miller Papers, J. J. Bertrand Belanger Papers, Ivy Bottini Papers, Sallie M. Fiske Papers, Edgar Sandifer’s Mississippi Gay Activist Collection, the Metropolitan Community Church Records, P-FLAG Records, ACT-UP Los Angeles Records, Christopher Street West (CSW) Pride Parade Records, the Gay Activist Alliance--New York, the Twice Blessed Collection (Jewish & gay collection), Advocate Records, Blue Max Motorcycle Club Records, Lambda Literary Foundation Collection, Jason Stuart Collection, Philip Gambone Oral History Collection, Lynn Edward Harris Collection, R. Scott Hitt Collection, Long Beach Center Collection, Neil Edwards Collection (physique photography), Dan Siminoski Collection (FBI files/court case), Orange County California Gay Collections, Metropolitan Community Church Collection, B.W. Grant Barnes Collection, Robert W. Basker Collection, Manual Boy Frank Collection, Reed Erickson Collection, Walter Williams Collection, Lillene H. Fifield Papers, Thomas F. Coleman Papers, Dorothy C. Putnam & Lois Mercer Papers, James Barr Papers, Evelyn Freedman Writings, Haldeman-Julius Publications, Miles Everett Photographs, Bob Smith Collection (author), Phil Tarley Collection and many others.

Performing Arts Collections includes a large subject file, the Purple Circuit Collection, Ralph Judd Collection on Cross-Dressing in the Performing Arts, Gay & Lesbian Television Scripts Collection, Charles Pierce Papers, Ken Dickmann Papers, Michael Kearns Papers, David Gaard, Theatrical Works Collection and other collections.

Kepner Research File: This collection is perhaps the oldest and largest general research collection on LGBT issues in the country. It contains both original materials such as writings, correspondence, lists, manuscripts, transcripts, financial materials, meeting minutes, and secondary materials such as pamphlets, brochures, periodical tear sheets and newspaper excerpts. Jim Kepner and others annotated much of this material. Kepner began collecting LGBT materials as early as 1942; although he died in 1997, ONE continues to add appropriate material. The Subject file consists of 20,000 files.

Audiovisual: The archive's collection of materials include over 1,500 films, over 3000 videos (including 10 years of videotaped lectures from ONE, Inc.'s Lecture Series), and over 1,000 audiotapes. Interviews with many pioneers of the LGBT movement are included from the IGLA interviews with notable gays and lesbians from Los Angeles and around the country. Also included are many tapes relating to the radio program IMRU as well as extensive video material of an erotic nature.

Books: The main library collection includes over 30,000 books, including 3,000 in the subject collections (see below). There are many rare and unusual books in the library, some of which may be the only copies in existence.

Magazines/Journals: The periodicals collection includes extensive LGBT titles as well as rare issues of the earliest American queer publications such as the lesbian newsletter Vice Versa from the 1940's, and complete runs of ONE magazine and the Mattachine Review from the early 1950's. There is also a complete run of the Advocate. The collection includes over 500 magazines in more than 25 different languages from places such as France, Germany, Russia, Brazil, the Netherlands, Japan, Spain, Italy, and many other nations. ONE's collections includes some of the earliest gay European publications such as the Arcadie and Der Kreis as well as significant runs of Gai Pied, SEK, Homologie, Der Gay Krant, Revolt, and Vennen.

Objects/Ephemera: T-shirts, buttons, clothing, leather, pins, event ephemera, and additional materials.

Art/Poster Collection: ONE Archives' art collection comprises of over 4,000 paintings, drawings, works on paper, photographs and sculptures, the majority of which were produced after the end of WWII. The scope of the collection ranges from works by well known artists such as Don Bachardy, Claire Falkenstein, Gronk, Sister Corita Kent, Kevin McCarty, Kate Millett, Sidney Bronstein and Arthur Tress, to numerous works by anonymous or unknown producers. For many of these unknowns, little biographical information on the artist exists, as she or he possibly worked anonymously or under a pseudonym as to avoid being "outed." As part of the archive's larger holdings, the art collection is inseparable from ONE's archival collections (publications, documents, ephemera, etc.) that provide a contextual background with which the artworks can understood as historical objects. Also includes posters of protests, bar events, and entertainment venues.

Collection Growth:
ONE collects LGBT materials including manuscripts, film/video, audio discs, electronic files, organizational records, personal papers, oral histories, material relating to LGBT performing arts, photographs, books, periodicals, artworks, ephemera and other materials with no geographical boundaries. ONE collects materials that are primarily about or which otherwise reflect on or impact the experience, history, lives, heritage and interests of gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender people. In addition, more general works on human sexuality, gender studies, sex and society, sexual discrimination, sexual rights, sexual health issues, including AIDS, etc. are collected to the extent that they provide a broader intellectual context and support for the more specialized LGBT aspects of the collections.

Access and Use:
1. What are the requirements for using the organization's/institution's material? ONE Archives welcomes all researchers including the general public, students and scholars.
2. HOURS: Tue. & Fri. 1:30pm - 5:30pm; Wed. & Thur. 3:30pm - 9:00pm; Saturday 11:00am - 5:00pm; Sundays & Mondays – Closed. Also by appointment.
3. Site is wheelchair accessible.
ONE’s primary collecting focus is on materials by and about members of the LGBT community, as well as on materials that document all aspects of their lives, interests, experiences and histories. ONE also collects materials that lack a specific LGBT focus, if they concern subjects or individuals of particular interest to gay and lesbian people. In addition, ONE collects more general materials on human gender and sexuality, including such subjects as gender studies, sex and society, sexual discrimination, sexual rights, sexual health issues, that provide a broader intellectual context and support for the more specialized LGBT aspects of the collections. The nature of materials ONE collects includes the historical, political, sociological, organizational and documentary, as well as the cultural and creative, including literature and the plastic and performing arts. ONE acquires collections of records, papers, manuscripts, photographs, audio/video materials and cultural objects by gift, bequest or purchase. All transfers of materials are documented by a legal transfer document (in the case of gifts and bequests, a Deed of Gift). ONE does not usually accept collections with use restrictions, although it will respect requests from donors to restrict access to certain records, provided the number of records is small relative to the size of the collection, and the restriction on access is for a carefully defined period of time. Whenever possible ONE obtains copyright to all donated materials, although this is not always achievable, particularly when the donor is not the creator. ONE lends materials from its collections to qualified institutions for exhibition purposes; whenever possible the items lent are duplicates. Materials deemed not relevant to ONE’s collecting objectives are de-accessioned. Duplicate periodicals are offered to other LGBT Archives.

Services:
research space, reference assistance on site, copying services, telephone reference, audiovisual facilities, Internet reference, loans for exhibition.

Indices:
ONE publishes its EAD finding aids on the Online Archive of California http://www.oac.cdlib.org/institutions/ONE+National+Gay+and+Lesbian+Archives
Collections listed in the OAC and additional collections are also listed on ONE’s website http://www.onearchives.org/collections.
Books, periodicals, audiovisual materials, subject files, and a wide variety of documents are listed in ONE’s InMagic database http://www.onearchives.org/collections. Some of the materials are also available on the USC library catalog.

Updating Collection Descriptions:
ONE notifies researchers of new and newly processed collections through our electronic newsletter http://www.onearchives.org/newsletter, our Facebook and MySpace page as well as various printed outlets. Members also receive postcard notifications of gallery exhibitions and our monthly lecture series.

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The OUTWORDS Archive, Inc.
Address: 555 W. 5th St., FL 35
Los Angeles, CA 90013
Email: info@theoutwordsarchive.org
Phone: (424) 261-9171
Contact: Mason Funk, Executive Director
Web: http://theoutwordsarchive.org/
History

OUTWORDS was founded by Mason Funk in 2016. We are not associated with any other institution or organization. We are a registered 501c3 non-profit corporation in the State of California.

MISSION

OUTWORDS collects, archives and shares the experience and wisdom of LGBTQ pioneers, to serve as a model for enduring social change in the United States and beyond.

VISION

OUTWORDS envisions a world where the proud history of the LGBTQ rights movement is preserved and celebrated; where LGBTQ youth understand that they are part of a strong, rich tradition, and thus engage more openly and creatively with the world; where the knowledge and wisdom accumulated over a half-century’s worth of queer activism empowers other marginalized communities in their quest for tolerance and legal protections; where labels fade, categories expand, and authenticity abounds.

PURPOSE

OUTWORDS is the only project in the United States specifically dedicated to capturing professional quality interviews with LGBTQ pioneers and elders from all cultural, economic, political and geographical areas and backgrounds. OUTWORDS believes these stories are an important part of the historical record, and serve an equally important role in educating and inspiring future generations. OUTWORDS is organized and operated exclusively for charitable purposes under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

Current Holdings: Size and Content

We have recorded 131 interviews averaging two hours in length from LGBTQ pioneers and elders living in 26 states + Washington DC. These interviews are on-camera with professional camera at 4K resolution and professional audio equipment. Our complete list of interviews is below.

We have contemporary portraits of all our subjects (taken on the day of their interviews) as well as personal photos submitted to us by our subjects (as few as five and as many as 30 or more).

Collection Growth

We are willing to assume curatorial responsibility for film and video assets relating to LGBTQ history. Our primary interest would be on-camera interviews with “pioneers and elders” (loosely defined) of the LGBTQ civil rights movement. We do not at present have a written curatorial policy — it would have to be developed.

Access and Use

We are in the process of building a digital platform that will make all our interviews fully available online for viewing (both transcripts and digital interview image). Use of the platform will be free for personal/educational use, with proper attribution. Those accessing our materials for commercial purposes will pay a license fee TBD. (We are in the early stages of developing these policies.)

Our digital platform will be searchable using traditional word or phrase searches.

INTERVIEWS as of November 2018

1. Franklin Abbott, Decatur, GA – poet, activist, psychotherapist; early member, Radical Faeries
2. Susan Allen, Slidell, LA – veteran reproductive freedom lobbyist and activist
3. Juan-Manuel Alonso, Palm Springs, CA – Cuban-American fashion designer, painter, and long-term HIV survivor
4. Crisosto Apache, Denver, CO – Native American / two spirit poet and cultural educator
5. Marcus Arana, San Francisco, CA – Native American transgender peace activist
6. Cliff Arnesen, Boston, MA – veterans rights activist, first bisexual man to testify before Congress
7. Vivienne Armstrong & Louise Young, Dallas, TX – longtime Dallas / national LGBTQ political and business leaders; Louise originated the concept of the HRC ‘Corporate Quality Index’
8. Don Bachardy, Santa Monica, CA – renowned painter and longtime lover of seminal gay author Christopher Isherwood
9. Ada Bello, Philadelphia, PA – Cuban-American LGBT rights activist; co-founder, Homophile Action League
10. Bruce Bastian, Orem, UT – businessman, philanthropist, social activist; co-founder, WordPerfect Software Company
11. Al Baum, San Francisco, CA – lawyer, environmental activist, psychotherapist, philanthropist; Grand Marshall, 2013 SF LGBT Pride Parade
12. Terry Baum, San Francisco, CA – feminist author and playwright; founder, Lilith Theater; candidate for US Congress and SF mayor
13. Hector Black, Cookeville, TN – Quaker; came out at age 70 inspired by his lesbian daughter; six years later his moral struggle to forgive her killer made headlines
14. Blackberri, Oakland, CA – singer/songwriter, Yoruba priest, AIDS education activist; appeared/performed in four Marlon Riggs’ films including “Tongues Untied”
15. David Bohnett, Los Angeles, CA – co-founder, GeoCities (first internet social networking site); LGBTQ & social justice philanthropist
16. Kathy Bowser, Dallas, TX – former nun, inner city teacher; long-time non-profit executive and former pastor, Celebration on the Lake church
17. Kylar Broadus, Washington DC – transgender activist, first trans man to testify on employment discrimination before Congress
18. Patrick Bova, Chicago, IL – retired social research scientist
19. Donna Burkett, Milwaukee, WI – early same-sex marriage plaintiff (1971-72); longtime activist for Milwaukee LGBTQ community
20. Stewart Butler, New Orleans, LA – Army veteran, engineer; founding member, Louisiana Gay Political Action Committee (1980)
21. Col. Grethe Cammermeyer, Whidbey Island, WA – Vietnam veteran, Bronze Star recipient, first Colonel to successfully challenge DADT
22. Rodney Church, Los Angeles, CA – department store salesman, longtime participant in LA gay black community
23. Karen Clark, St. Paul, MN – member, Minnesota House of Representatives, for 38 years; longest serving openly lesbian member of a US state legislature
24. Aaron Coleman, Houston, TX – singer/songwriter, minority AIDS activist
25. Emma Colquitt-Sayers, Dallas, TX – longtime ‘servant-leader’, medical care entrepreneur, adoptive mother
26. James Credle, Newark, NJ – former Vietnam medic; retired Asst Dean of Students at Rutgers University; minority HIV/AIDS educator and activist
27. Jennifer Crossen, Lawrenceburg, KY – lesbian activist; birth mother in Kentucky's first step-parent adoption within a same-sex marriage in 2014
28. Sharon Day, Minneapolis, MN – member, Bois Forte Band of Ojibwe People; executive director, Indigenous Peoples Task Force
29. Marianne Diaz, Los Angeles, CA – former incarcerated gang member, community activist; founder, “Clean Slate”
30. Diane Divelbess, Whidbey Island, WA – artist, and Professor Emeritus of Art at California Polytechnic University, Pomona
31. Jim Darby, Chicago, IL – former Navy technician, school teacher, and gay veterans activist
32. JD Doyle, Houston, TX – founder, Queer Music Heritage (radio show / website), Houston LGBT History, Texas Obituary Project; former Grand Marshal, Houston Gay Pride
33. Doc Duhon, Palm Springs, CA – former energy executive, polyamory educator, and longterm HIV survivor
34. Jan Edwards, Sonoma, CA – longtime educator, local activist
35. Arden Eversmeyer, Houston, TX – longtime lesbian activist and historian; founder, “Old Lesbians Organizing for Change” and “Old Lesbians Oral History Project”
36. Luigi Ferrer, Miami, FL – influential bisexual activist, HIV long-term survivor
37. Phyllis Randolph Frye, Houston, TX – lawyer, first out transgender judge in the United States
38. Jewelle Gomez, San Francisco, CA – author, Lambda Award-winning novel “The Gilda Stories”; founding board member, GLAAD; former president, SF Library Commission
39. Jamison Green, Union City, CA – author, “Becoming a Visible Man”; trans educator and activist; former president, World Professional Association for Transgender Health
40. Shirley Greenes, Lake Forest, CA – mother of Rob Eichberg, late author of the seminal 1990 book “Coming Out: An Act of Love”
41. Jim Gribben, Gun Barrel City, TX – former actor and dancer; music director, rural Texas LGBT activist
42. Susan Griffin, Berkeley, CA – pioneering radical feminist author and environmental activist; Pulitzer finalist, MacArthur and NEA grantee, Emmy Award winner
43. Miss Major Griffin-Gracy, Oakland, CA – community leader, transgender women of color activist
44. Mike Grossman, Dallas, TX – co-founder, Oak Lawn Counseling Center; former Dallas Humanitarian of the Year and Realtor of the Year
45. Kim Grubbs, Lauderdale, MS – psychologist, ‘de-cluttering’ professional
46. Dean Hamer, Haleiwa, HI – ‘gay gene’ geneticist, HIV researcher, filmmaker (“Out in the Silence”, “Kumu Hina”)
47. Gary ‘Buz’ Hermes, Sonoma, CA – former AIDS activist; creator, “Aging Gayfully” workshops for LGBTQ elders
48. Michael Hickerson, New Orleans, LA – community activist, long-term HIV survivor; executive director, “In This Together” community services agency
49. Ray Hill, Houston, TX – ex-con, radio host, prisoner rights activist; plaintiff, ‘Houston v Hill’ (landmark Supreme Court 1st Amendment case)
50. Pat Hussain, Atlanta, GA – co-founded Southerners On New Ground (SONG) focusing on widening racial divide in LGBTQ community
51. Loraine Hutchins, Washington, DC – bisexual activist; co-editor, “Bi Any Other Name: Bisexual People Speak Out”
52. John James, Philadelphia, PA – early gay activist, HIV/AIDS educator
53. Karla Jay, New York, NY – retired professor; early member, Gay Liberation Front / Lavender Menace
54. Fenton Johnson, Tucson, AZ – award-winning novelist (“Scissors, Paper, Rock”, “The Man Who Loved Birds”), essayist (“The Future of Queer”)
55. ABilly S. Jones-Hennin, Washington DC – community organizer, AIDS activist, bisexual pioneer
56. Eric Julber, Carmel, CA – retired lawyer; successfully defended ONE magazine on obscenity charges before the US Supreme Court in 1958
57. Lani Ka’ahumanu, Cazadero, CA – bisexual/feminist activist and author; co-founder, San Francisco State University Women Studies Department
58. Bobbi Keppel, Portland, ME – retired social worker, bisexual pioneer, community activist
59. Chris Kluwe, Seal Beach, CA – former NFL punter, and outspoken LGBTQ rights advocate
60. Arlene Krantz, Los Angeles, CA – entrepreneur and business strategist; longtime bisexual rights activist
61. Kay Lahusen, Kennett Square, PA – first openly gay American woman photojournalist
62. Carol Lease, Denver, CO – social worker, women’s empowerment activist
63. June Lagmay, Los Angeles, CA – Los Angeles city clerk under four consecutive mayors; early member, API (Asian Pacific Islander) Equality LA
64. Trella Laughlin, Eureka Springs, AR – veteran international human rights filmmaker and activist
65. William Lindsay, Little Rock, AR – retired Catholic theologian; fired from his Catholic university teaching position for being gay
66. Ed La Haye, Los Angeles, CA – retired floral designer, cancer survivor, originally from rural South Carolina
67. Gene La Pietra, Los Angeles, CA – founder and former owner, Arena and Circus (legendary LA gay clubs primarily serving Latinos and other minority groups)
68. Dick Leitsch, New York, NY – former president, NY Mattachine Society; organizer, Julius Bar ‘sip-ins’ (1966)
69. Crystal Little, Bay St. Louis, MS – Navy veteran, longtime New Orleans transgender activist
70. Kenneth M., Houston, TX – Closeted, gender fluid Baptist chaplain
71. Lee Marquardt, Los Angeles – former Michigan housewife, truck driver, mother of three, late-blooming lesbian activist
72. Marge McCann, Kennett Square, PA – longtime lesbian activist; early member, Philadelphia chapters of Mattachine Society and Daughters of Bilitis
73. John McDonald, Palm Springs, CA – gay philanthropy pioneer; co-endowed first professorship devoted to same sex and gender identity law at UCLA’s Williams Institute
74. David McEwan, Honolulu, HI – physician, HIV/AIDS activist, co-founder of the Hawaii LGBT Legacy Foundation
75. Father John McGrann, Portland, OR – founder, ‘Kairos Support for Caregivers’, an AIDS service organization in SF at height of AIDS epidemic
76. Shannon Minter, Washington DC – trans man; legal director, National Center for Lesbian Rights
77. Mary Morten, Chicago, IL – filmmaker, fundraiser, and first African-American president of Chicago NOW
78. Tom Mosmiller, Oakland, CA – longtime bisexual and pro-feminist men’s activist; AIDS activist and educator
79. Jack Myers, Jackson, MS – ‘patron saint’ of Mississippi gay scene; owner of gay bars in and around Jackson for 50 years
80. Nancy Nangeroni, Albuquerque, NM – founder, GenderTalk radio; former chair, Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition
81. Julie Nemecek, Spring Arbor, MI – transgender former Baptist minister and college professor
82. Joanne Nemecek, Springs Arbor, MI – quilter, chef, grandmother; Julie Nemecek’s wife both prior to and since Julie’s transition
83. Diana Nyad, Los Angeles, CA – renowned marathon swimmer, news commentator, author, motivational speaker, lesbian icon
84. Robyn Ochs, Boston, MA – bisexual educator, activist, and author. Editor, “Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals around the World”
85. Betsy Parsons, Portand, ME – retired school teacher, GSA (gay straight alliance) organizer and activist
86. Suzanne Pharr, Little Rock, AR – author and ‘political handywoman’; founder, Women’s Project of Arkansas, and co-founder, Southerners on New Ground.
87. Rev. Troy Perry, Los Angeles, CA – longtime LGBTQ activist and founder, Metropolitan Community Church
88. Mira Patel, Washington DC – former State Department staffer under Hillary Clinton; international LGBTQ rights pioneer
89. Bradley Picklesimer, Meally, KY – drag performer, party planner, nightclub proprietor
90. K.C. Potter, Centerville, TN – Dean Emeritus of Residential and Judicial Affairs at Vanderbilt University; hosted early Lambda meetings for students
91. Valda Prout, Washington DC – transgender woman, sex workers advocate
92. Don Quaintance, Centerville, MN – co-founder, Men’s Circle of East Central Minnesota; helped found local PFLAG chapter and to defeat Minnesota’s Marriage Amendment
93. Donna Red Wing, Des Moines, IA – longtime activist; Christian Coalition’s “most dangerous woman in America”; first recipient, Walter Cronkite Award for Faith and Freedom
94. Diana Rivers, Fayetteville, AR – novelist, artist, and founder/promoter of women’s venues and communities
95. Alexei Romanoff, Pasadena, CA – pioneering LGBTQ activist; co-organizer, 1967 Black Cat protests for LGBTQ rights and protection from police brutality
96. Matt Russell, Lacona, IA – former seminarian; farmer and sustainable agriculture activist
97. Kathleen Saadat, Portland, OR – former Director of Affirmative Action, State of Oregon; LGBTQ, AIDS, and racial equity advocate and activist
98. Donna Sachet, San Francisco, CA – drag performer, community activist, fundraiser and author
99. Barbara Scott, Pass Christian, MS – longtime bar/cabaret/hotel owner, feminist, author, historic preservationist
100. Mark Segal, Philadelphia, PA – co-founder, Gay Liberation Front; publisher, “Philadelphia Gay News”, oldest weekly gay publication in US
101. Guy Seiler, Tajique, NM – Kansas farm boy, musician, teacher; longtime partner of gay sexuality/spirituality pioneer Bert Herrmann
102. Ruth Shack, Miami, FL – Dade County Commissioner 1976-84; spearheaded 1977 Florida Human Rights Ordinance inciting Anita Bryant's hateful "Save Our Children" campaign against homosexual rights
103. Martha Shelley, Portland, OR – early member, Gay Liberation Front and Lavender Menace; essayist, fiction writer, and poet; urban sustainable farmer
104. Charles Silverstein, New York, NY – psychotherapist, author (“The Joy of Gay Sex”); key figure in reversing the American Psychiatric Association’s labeling of homosexuality as a disease
105. Michael Slingerland, Gun Barrel City, TX – owner, Garlow’s gay bar; longtime LGBT community supporter
106. Jay Simonson, Boston, MA – transgender man, environmental educator
107. Kim Stacy, Willisburg, KY – woodworker and home builder in rural Kentucky
108. Penelope Starr, Tucson, AZ – artist, domestic violence activist, bisexual/polyamory advocate; founder, Odyssey Storytelling project
109. Rear Admiral Alan Steinman (Ret.), Olympia, WA – former Director of Health and Safety for the U.S. Coast Guard; Chief of Medical Branch, US Public Health Service; anti-DADT activist
110. Martha Stephens, New York, NY – retired psychiatrist, furniture maker
111. Charles Stinson, San Francisco, CA – retired psychiatrist, artist, sculptor
112. Zeek Taylor, Eureka Springs, AR – artist, author, and storyteller; part of the first LGBT couple to have their marriage license recorded in Arkansas
113. Jewel Thais-Williams, Los Angeles, CA – founder, Jewel’s Catch One, groundbreaking gay black dance club; co-founder, AIDS Minority Project; alternative medicine pioneer
114. Jim Toy, Ann Arbor, MI – Chinese-American former student activist, founder of Detroit Gay Liberation Movement
115. Jean-Nickolaus Tretter, Minneapolis, MN – longtime LGBTQ historian; founder, Jean- Nickolaus Tretter Collection in GLBT Studies, University of Minnesota
116. Kitty Tsui, Long Beach, CA – award-winning Chinese-American poet, Gay Games gold medalist
117. Dick Wagner, Madison, WI – first openly gay member, Dane County Board of Supervisors; Wisconsin LGBTQ historian
118. Honey Ward, Santa Fe, NM – longtime activist and participant in ‘The Experience’, an early, pivotal LGBTQ empowerment workshop
119. Lamar Van Dyke, Seattle, WA – radical lesbian activist, tattoo shop owner, painter, Seattle LGBTQ pioneer
120. Bruce Vilanch, Los Angeles, CA – comedy writer, songwriter, actor; six-time Emmy Award winner
121. Rags Watkins, Magnolia, MS – interior designer, former art gallery director for multiple NY galleries, long-term HIV survivor
122. Gary and Millie Watts, Provo, UT – co-founders, Family Fellowship to provide support and education for families of gay Mormons
123. Corky Wick, San Francisco, CA – mother, grandmother; founder, Mothertongue Feminist Theater Collective
124. GiGi Wilbur, Houston, TX – intersex, bisexual BDSM educator and activist; author, “The Dominant’s Handbook”
125. Chuck Williams, Malibu, CA – former computer executive; founder, The Williams Institute (sexual identity/gender orientation law & public policy) at UCLA Law School
126. Elizabeth Williams, Philadelphia, PA – trans woman; actor, John Waters’ “Pink Flamingos” and “Female Trouble”
127. Charlotte Wilson, Boston, MA – military veteran, information technology entrepreneur; member, Moving Violations motorcycle club
128. Evan Wolfson, New York, NY – “architect” of the marriage equality movement
129. Rob Wright, Palm Springs, CA – gay philanthropy pioneer; co-endowed first professorship devoted to same sex and gender identity law at UCLA’s Williams Institute
130. Mia Yamamoto, Los Angeles, CA – survivor of WWII Japanese concentration camps, longtime Los Angeles lawyer, trans woman
131. Richard Zaldivar, Los Angeles, CA – founder, “The Wall / Las Memorias”, providing advocacy and education for Latino, LGBTQ, and other underserved LA communities

 

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San Francisco Performing Arts Library & Museum
401 Van Ness Ave, Fourth floor
San Francisco, CA 94102
Phone: (415) 255-4800
Contacts: David Humphrey, Director or Kirsten Tanaka, Head Librarian
Email: Info@sfpalm.org
Internet address: http://www.sfpalm.org
Collecting areas: History of the performing arts in the San Franscisco Bay Area: dance, music, opera, theater (including mime, puppetry and especially musical theater), and theatrical design.

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San Francisco Public Library
James C. Hormel Gay and Lesbian Center
Location: 100 Larkin Street
San Francisco, CA 94102
Phone: (415) 557-4566 Fax: (415) 437-4831
Contact: Jim E. Van Buskirk, Program Manager
Email: jvanbuskirk@sfpl.org
Internethttp://sfpl.org/librarylocations/main/glc/glc.htm
Hours: Manuscript collections are accessible through the San Francisco History Room: Tue, Wed, Thu: 10 am - 6 pm; Fri: 11 am - 5 pm; Sat: 9 am - 5 pm; Sun: 12-5 pm. Access to other materials at the Gay and Lesbian Center is during regular library hours: Mon.: 10 am - 6 pm; Tue, Wed, Thu:  9 am - 8 pm; Fri: 11 am - 5 pm; Sat:  9 am - 5 pm; Sun:  12 - 5 pm.
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
Announced in October 1991 the Gay and Lesbian Center opened to the public on April 18, 1996, as part of the main San Francisco Public Library. It maintains a collection of books, periodicals, videos, sound recordings, photographs, posters, ephemera, memorabilia, and manuscript collections. In addition to actively soliciting donations of personal papers and organizational records it is also the physical repository for selected manuscript collections belonging to the Gay and Lesbian Historical Society of Northern California.
Information about holdings
Manuscripts: 460 cubic ft.
Organizational records: 60 cubic ft.
Printed material: 850 ft.
Clippings/vertical files: 10 ft.
Objects/ephemera: 10 ft.
Film/Video/Sound: 100 ft.
Photographs: yes
Microfilm: 50 ft.

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
All time periods, with a concentration on post-1969. Manuscript materials specifically related to Northern California. Published materials international in scope, with an attempt to be comprehensive for Northern California.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender communities in Northern California including Aaron Fricke, Lynn Lonidier, Harvey Milk, Paul Reed , and Randy Shilts. Archival holdings include:  Monica Kehoe, Lynn Lonidier, Marvin Liebman, Harvey Milk, Federation of Gay Games, Kiki Gallery, Alice B. Toklas Collection - Letters to Donald H. Frank, and selections from the Gay and Lesbian Historical Society of Northern California:  Louis Graydon Sullivan, Jackie Winnow, Robert G. DeSantis, Arthur Lazere, Leonard Matlovich, Golden Gate Business Association, Lesbian Agenda for Action, Len Evans Papers, Charles Thorpe, People's Fund, Committee to Form Gay/Lesbian Sierrans, Thousand Fingers Cooperative Crafts Gallery, Scott Bishop, Libertarians for Gay Lesbian Concerns, Joseph Rose-Azevedo, GLAAD/SFBA, and Old Wives' Tale Bookstore..
Collecting interests
The Gay and Lesbian collections contain unpublished materials focusing on northern California, while published works are national and international in scope. Particular attention is paid to materials dealing with people of color, people with disabilities, youth, elderly, and other traditionally underserved groups. Formats include books, magazines, manuscripts, films, videos, photographs, posters, recordings, ephemera, and memorabilia.
Use requirements
Open to the public for on-site reference

Comments about access/use:
Archival collections available through the San Francisco History Room.
Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, exhibitions, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, and loan agreements for exhibits.

Other services/notes:
No materials may be borrowed.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Published materials are available via the SFPL online catalog. Collection level descriptions of manuscript materials are cataloged in MARC and available in the SFPL catalog and OCLC. Finding aids to selected collections are available on-site.
News about collections
There are periodic updates in the online catalog.

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San Jose State University

Address: San Jose State University, Special Collections & Archives
One Washington Square
San Jose, CA 95192-0028
Contact: Danelle Moon
Web: http://library.sjsu.edu/sjsu-special-collections/sjsu-special-collections-and-archives
Phone: 408/808-2061
Fax: 408/808-2063
Email: danelle.moon@sjsu.edu

History
SJSU Special Collections & Archives exist to acquire, preserve, arrange, describe, and make accessible its rich holdings of secondary and primary materials to support the diverse teaching and research needs of undergraduates, graduates, faculty, staff, and the larger community. These collections document local, regional, and California history, with a specific focus on history, politics, literature, and art. In addition, the Department is responsible for documenting the history of the university, and has a large collection of university and faculty publications, administrative records, photographs, and ephemera.

Current Holdings: Size and Content
SJSU holds 160.21 linear feet of relevant material in the following formats: Manuscript material (personal papers); Film, video, or sound; Organization's records; Photographs; Printed (books, journals, etc.); Clippings or vertical files; and Objects and ephemera (key chains, bumper tickers, graffiti, t-shirts, etc.). This material covers the San Francisco Bay area, with focus on the South Bay (Santa Clara County, San Jose), 1970s to present. It focuses on local organizations, with some images of Harvey Milk. More information can be found through the Online Archive of California at the following URLs:
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt7k4039w2/
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt0v19r74d/
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt1h4nc63m/
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt409nc8dw/
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt1000257m/

 

Access and Use:
What are the requirements for using the organization's/institution's material? No restrictions
Are regular hours maintained for access (please specify when), or is it by appointment only? Yes, 38 hours per week
Is the site wheelchair accessible? yes

Services:
Research space; Reference assistance on site; Telephone reference; Internet reference (e-mail/web); Copying services YES

Indices to the collections:
All available through OCLC, Library OPAC, SJSU Scholar Works, and Online Archives of California.

Updating Collection Descriptions:
We highlight new collections on our website and through the library newsletters.

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Stanford University, Green Library
Department of Special Collections
Location: Cecil H Green Library
[East Wing, Third floor]
557 Escondido Mall
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-6004
Phone: (650) 725-3478 Fax: (415) 723-8690
Contact: Glynn Edwards, Manuscripts; John Mustain, Rare Books; Margaret Kimball, University Archives
Email: speccoll@sulmain.stanford.edu
Internet address:   http://garamond.stanford.edu/depts/spc/
Hours: Mon-Fri: 9 am - 5 pm
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
The Department of Special Collections is the principal repository for Stanford's historical research collections in all formats including printed books, manuscripts, maps, photographs, and prints. The department's holdings comprise more than 200,000 books and 20 million manuscript items. Strengths of the department's collections are modern literature, the history and art of the book, the history of science, continental history and literature, classical literature and philosophy, children's literature, Mexican American history, and the history of the Stanford community.
Information about holdings
Manuscripts: yes
Organizational records: yes
Printed material: yes
Clippings/vertical files: yes
Objects/ephemera: yes
Film/Video/Sound: yes
Photographs: yes

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
Most collections relevant to LGBT archives deal with Stanford University or alumni, 1972 to the present.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
Gay and Lesbian Alliance at Stanford and other collections dealing with gay and lesbian history at Stanford University, Kerrigan Black Papers 1963-1993, Gerard Koskovich - AIDS Activism publications, and Newton "Bud" Flounders collection of gay literature (over 3,000 volumes).
Collecting interests
Continuation of collections concerning the gay and lesbian history of Stanford and from alumni.
Use requirements
Open to scholars and researchers regardless of institutional affiliation.
Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, Internet reference (email/web), and loan agreements for exhibits.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Collection level descriptions are available on Socrates, the Stanford University catalog, and RLIN. Finding aids and a card catalog are also available, as is information on the UNICORN web site.

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University of California, Berkeley
Bancroft Library
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
Phone: (510) 642-6481
Email: Bancref@library.berkeley.edu
Internet address: http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/
also http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/gaybears/

History:
The Bancroft Library was formed by Hubert Howe Bancroft, a bookseller who came to San Francisco during the Gold Rush. Bancroft's collection was purchased by the University of California in 1905, and has grown into the largest archive on the history of the Pacific West as well as the principal rare books and manuscripts library of U.C. Berkeley. As such, it contains a wealth of material of potential relevance to LGBT scholars, but efforts to collect materials related to sexuality have only been formalized in recent years. In 1992 Bancroft's Regional Oral History Office began interviews for its San Francisco AIDS oral history series. In 1995 librarian William Benemann founded the Gay Bears! Collection in the University Archives, within Bancroft, to document lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender life on the Berkeley campus. In 2000, Bancroft appointed Mr. Benemann as adjunct (and founding) curator of the Sexual Orientation and Social Conflict Collection to document controversial gay-related issues.

Information About Holdings:
Approximately 78 linear feet of archival material has been collected as part of the Sexual Orientation and Social Conflict Collection, and some photographic material is present in these collections. Approximately 350 book titles have also been added under this effort.

Bancroft Library has other holdings of potential interest to researchers in LBGT history which are not part of the Sexuality and Gender Collection. (See below.)

Manuscript material (personal papers) Yes
Film, video, or sound Yes
Organization's records Yes
Photographs Yes
Printed (books, journals, etc.) Yes
Microfilm No
Clippings or vertical files No

Time Periods/Geographic Regions Documented
Sexuality material covers the period from the late 19th century to the present. While the emphasis is on California and the West, much of the earlier material has a national focus. The Gay Bears! Collection includes oral history interviews with alumni/ae from the 1940s to the present.

People, Organizations and Subjects Documented
Holdings include the archives of the Sexual Freedom League, the Social Protest Collection, the San Francisco AIDS oral history series, Red Jordan Arobateau papers, Samuel M. Steward (Phil Andros) letters, case files of Crandall v. Wagner (lesbian adoption) and the Baehr Case (same sex marriage in Hawaii), and records of the Stop AIDS Project/San Francisco, Dignity/San Francisco (gay Catholics), GLSTN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Teachers Network), and Theatre Rhinoceros. Also present is anti-gay material from Mission: America and the Focus on Family. Special collections include sex instruction manuals for boys and young men (1847-1990), early scientific texts on homosexuality (1930s-1950s), and gay-themed books for children and young adults.

Bancroft also holds manuscript, correspondence and/or photographic collections that, while not all LGBT collections per se, are important sources for the study of literary and artistic communities which may be of interest to LGBT historians. These collections include papers and records related to City Lights Books and beat poets, Philip Whalen, Jack Spicer, Langston Hughes, Gertrude Stein, Stephen Spender, Robert Duncan, Noel Sullivan, and Barbara Christian, among others.

Collection Growth

All materials falling to the general category of gay history (pre-1970s), and contemporary material with California or Western focus.

Access Requirements

Open to the public regardless of LGBT content. Must be over 18 or accompanied by an adult. Photo ID required.

Hours

During the academic year, M-F 9 am-5 pm, Sat. 1 pm-5pm. Schedules vary during holidays. See web site for current hours.

Wheelchair Accessible
Yes.

Services
Research space: Yes
Reference assistance on site: Yes
Copying services: Yes
Telephone reference: Yes
Audiovisual facilities: (limited)
Internet reference: (e mail/web)
Exhibitions: Yes

Indices
All materials cataloged on RLIN and OCLC; folder-level finding aids available for most processed archival collections.

Updating Collection Descriptions

Significant additions are announced in local gay newspapers

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University of California, Los Angeles
Department of Special Collections
Location: Charles E. Young Research Library
Room A1713
Address: Box 951575
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575
Phone: (310) 825-4988 Fax: (310) 206-1864
Email: spec-coll@library.ucla.edu
Internet addresshttp://www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/special/scweb/
Hours: Mon-Sat: 9 am - 5 pm, except certain intersession days and during some special events.
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
The Department of Special Collections was founded in 1946.
Information about holdings
Manuscripts: 500 ft.
Printed material: thousands
Clippings/vertical files: 20 ft.
Objects/ephemera: 200 items
Film/Video/Sound: 250 items
Photographs: thousands
Microfilm: minimal

Time periods/geographical regions documented:
Primarily the Los Angeles area, but printed materials cover the entire range of world history.

Significant People/organizations/subjects documented:
There are published and manuscript materials pertaining to hundreds of prominent LGBT figures including J. A. Symonds, Gertrude Stein, H. H. Monro, Denton Welch, Claude McKay, Harry Hay, Morris Kight, Terri de la Pena, Christopher Isherwood, Don Bachardy, John Rechy, Yannis Tsarouchis, Stathis Orphanos, Ivy Compton Burnett, Norman Douglas, William Plomer, Anais Nin, William Beckford, Arthur Rimbaud, Ronald Firbank, George Santayana, Glenway Wescott, Tennessee Williams, Virginia Woolf, T. H. White, A.E. Housman, Gerald Heard, Eloise Klein Healy, Paul Monette, Michael Nava, Edouard Roditi, and Howard Moss. Local minor figures are represented by writers Rudy Thomas Foley and Dan Luckenbill. The Rudi Gernreich papers contain a small amount of material pertaining to the first meetings of the Mattachine Society in Los Angeles. Most of these papers are from literary figures, but for those such as Paul Monette's, other community activist concerns are documented. The papers of Morris Kight give insight into the many Los Angeles and international LGBT organizations and activities, although the papers at UCLA do not document these in a systematic way.
All important areas are documented to some extent, including psychology. Many of these studies were begun at UCLA with prominent figures such as Evelyn Hooker. Early work in transgender studies is documented in the papers of UCLA psychiatrist Robert Stoller. Special collections also has works of popular psychology wherein many 20th century works on homosexuality were published, for example Homo Hill (1963), Homosexuality: The International Disease (1965). Particularly important in the UCLA holdings are local imprints that contain hundreds of books in wrappers on popular journalism and psychology and local travel guides and other guides invaluable to LGBT history, and hundreds of titles in all genres of popular literature, particularly detective fiction and erotica.
The history of photography collection contain works by Von Gloeden (in publications) and works by various photographers: Bernice Abbott, Carl van Vechten, Stathis Orphanos, etc. UCLA Special Collections also has collections in the areas of the arts and entertainment, including the gallery records of the Rex Evans Gallery, owned by Rex Evans and James Weatherford (with documentation and correspondence pertaining to Cecil Beaton, Don Bachardy, Louis Fox, Sheila Ross, etc.).
Collecting interests
LGBT materials primarily in support of long-standing collecting areas: local imprints, literature, and culture, etc.
Use requirements
Users must have valid UCLA library cards. Library cards may be obtained on presentation of photo identification. Priority of service is given to researchers formally affiliated with UCLA or with the UC system. There are fees for telephone and mail requests by researchers not affiliated with the university.

Comments about access/use:
No appointment is needed but some materials require 24 hours to retrieve from off-site storage.
Services
Research space, copying, audiovisual facilities, exhibitions, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, Internet reference (email/web), and loan agreements for exhibits.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Manuscripts have card indices until about 1979, with subject and name added entries, then collection level computer entries. Most manuscript collections have at least box level descriptions, many have folder level and some item level descriptions in finding aids. Some finding aids are available on the web.
 
 

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University of Los Angeles, California - Chicano Studies Resource Center

Address: UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
193 Haines Hall
Box 951544
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1544
Contact: Librarian, Lizette Guerra: lguerra@chicano.ucla.edu / Archives Manager, Michael Stone mstoneic@ucla.edu
Web: http://www.chicano.ucla.edu/default.htm
Director: Professor Chon Noriega
Assistant Director: Javier Iribarren
Phone: 310-825-2363
Library Phone: 310-206-6052 (Lizette Guerra)
Archive phone: 310-825-0648 (Michael Stone)
Fax: 310-206-1784

History:
The UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center (CSRC) was founded in 1969 with a commitment to foster multidisciplinary research efforts as part of the land grant mission of the University of California. That mission states that University of California research needs to be in the service of the state and that it must maintain a presence in the local community.
   The CSRC serves the entire campus and supports faculty and students in the social sciences, life sciences, humanities, and the professional schools. Its research addresses the growing Chicano and Latino population, which now constitutes nearly one-third of California's and one-half of Los Angeles's population, yet continues to have disproportionately low access to higher education. Given its campus- and community-wide mandate, the CSRC reports directly to the Office of the Chancellor at UCLA. The CSRC also forms part of the Inter-University Program for Latino Research (IUPLR), a consortium of Latino research centers located at sixteen institutions in the United States.
   The CSRC houses a library and special collections archive, an academic press, research projects, community-based partnerships, two competitive grant/fellowship programs, and the Los Tigres del Norte Fund. It is also the host of a book series on Latina/o artists titled A Ver: Revisioning Art History.
   Since the 1970s the CSRC has held six "institutional FTEs," faculty positions that are placed on loan to departments. These positions were created to increase the CSRC's research capacity; they also allow the CSRC to serve as a vital force across campus for diversifying the curriculum and the faculty.

Current Holdings: Size and Content:
Approximately 200 linear feet of personal papers.
We have the original video productions of the photographer Laura Aguilar.
We have about 50 linear feet of organizational papers (in the above personal papers category we have the Elena Pop papers, which is also in the realm of being an institutional collection based on her political advocacy and campaigning.)
We are in possession but do not own outright the collected works of Laura Aguilar, somewhere in the neighborhood of 100 linear feet of archival photo boxes.
Our library holds a significant collection of volumes on the subject of LGBTQ books as per it’s relevance within the Chicana/o Latina/o community.
Queer Nation, VIVA and The Robert Legorreta all have large quantities of ephemera.

Collection Summaries:
Dan Guerrero Research Collection
Currently in process. This collection of about 40 linear feet of papers, photos, videos and ephemera represent the work of TV producer Dan Guerrero. Approx. 20 linear feet
Sandra Ortiz Papers
Currently in process. Approx. 1 linear foot of papers relating to Ms. Ortiz’s participation in the organization: Lesbianas Unidas
Betty Jetter Papers
Currently in process. .5 linear foot of correspondence on lesbian issues. Very interesting collection.
Laura Esquivel Papers
2 linear feet of papers pertaining to the work of lesbian activists, Laura Esquivel.
Elena Popp Papers
Currently in process. Approx. 70 linear feet of papers relating to the human rights / housing activist’s political campaigns in Los Angeles.
Queer Nation Archive
Currently in process. Approx. 10 linear feet of papers and ephemera pertaining to the LA and San Francisco branches of the organization.
The Fire of Life: The Robert Legorreta - Cyclona Collection
Approx. 100 linear feet, processed—though we are working on new additions to the collections. This collection of papers, photos, LP records and three-dimensional items represents the personal collection of the performance artist Robert Legorreta also known as Cyclona. Items of special interest include Cyclona's scrapbook and LP record and artifact collection depicting representations of Latinos.
The Yolanda Retter Papers
Currently in process. This collection of approx. 50 linear feet was donated to the library archive upon her passing in 2006. It contains manuscripts, correspondence, personal and historical research papers as well as books, videos and ephemera.
VIVA Archive
This collection of 20 linear feet primarily consists of papers related to the administration, events, exhibitions, performances, projects, outreach, project, art and publications of VIVA!, an organization founded to promote Lesbian Latina and Gay Latino artists and their culture. The collection contains photographs, negatives, transparencies, artwork, papers, t-shirts, catalogs and printed materials.
Laura Aguilar Collection
We house the majority of all of Laura Aguilar’s photographic output. We DO NOT own her collection, it is merely a safe repository. Nevertheless we are documenting the collection.

Collection Growth:
We are available to collect papers of organizations that have both a Latina/o , Chicana/o and LGBTQ angle.

Access and Use:
What are the requirements for using the organization's/institution's material? There are no requirements other than filling out our Archival materials request form.
Are regular hours maintained for access (please specify when), or is it by appointment only? Generally yes, by appointment, though we do try and accommodate walk-ins. Many of our archives are stored off site so filling in the Archival Request form establishes the time and date of the research.
Is the site wheelchair accessible? Yes.

Services:
1. Research space 2. Reference assistance on site 3. Telephone reference 310-2061784 / 310-825-0648 4. Internet reference (e-mail/web) lguerra@chicano.ucla.edu / mstoneic@ucla.edu 5. Copying services 6. Audiovisual facilities 7. Exhibitions Loan agreements for exhibits

Indices to the collections:
Our cataloged collection are on ORION.

Updating Collection Descriptions:
Updates to our collections are announced in a monthly newsletter.

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Women's Resource Center
Location: University of California
250 Golden Bear Center
Berkeley, CA 94720-2440
Phone: (510) 642-4786 Fax: (510) 642-9078
Contact: Dorothy Lazard
Internet addresshttp://www.aad.berkeley.edu/uga/osl/wrc/
Hours: Mon-Thu: 9 am - 5 pm; Fri: 9 am - 12 pm.
Wheelchair Access: yes
History
The Women's Resource Center Library was founded in 1972. Information about LGBT culture and history has always been a part of the WRC collection; the Constance Barker Collection includes early lesbian history and literature and was incorporated into the WRC collection in the 1980s.
Holdings summary
The WRC Library has always maintained information about the GLB community in its collection. The pamphlet file collection (2 file drawers) covers topical areas such as the gay movement, gay/lesbian culture, legal and political issues, parenting, coming out stories, gays in the military, homophobia, employment issues, etc. These files also contain organizational newsletters and brochures, newspaper and magazine articles, monographs, bibliographies, and journal articles. Journals such as Sinister Wisdom, Off Our Backs, and the defunct Outlook are part of the Periodicals Collection. Historical journals such as The Ladder, various grassroots women's newspapers of the 1970s, as well as the Constance Barker Collection (early lesbian histories and literature) are part of the Reference Collection. Altogether, the printed volumes number over 350.
Use requirements
Anyone may use the collection during business hours.
Services
Research space, copying, reference assistance on site, telephone reference, and borrowing privileges for individuals.

Other services/notes:
Borrowing privileges of books are reserved only for books and are limited to Berkeley students, staff and faculty.
Indices, finding aids, collection descriptions
Author/Title and Subject card catalog; pamphlet file index (for searching topical files); periodicals are listed alphabetically by title.
News about collections
Occasional acquisition lists are compiled and may be picked up at the WRC. They may be included on our web site in the future.

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