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accuracy

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n. (accurate, adj.) ~ The degree of precision to which something is correct, truthful, and free of error or distortion, whether by omission or commission.

Citations:
(AIIM, Performance Guidelines 1992) Records produced within a short period after the event or activity occurs tend to be more readily acceptable as accurate than records produced long after the event or activity. However, a challenge to admissibility of a later-produced record can be overcome by a showing that the time lapse had no effect on the record's contents. For example, a computer printout of a statistical report produced annually in the regular course of business can be shown to accurately consolidate data compiled over the course of a year.
(CJS, Records §12) Under statutes which require that instruments filed for record shall be recorded at length in a book kept for that purpose it has been held that no particular method of recording is necessary, and as long as the method adopted is sufficient to give the instrument perpetuity and publicity and meets the requirements of accuracy and durability, there is compliance with the statute.
(Goerler 1999, p. 316) Sometimes the historical accuracy of a documentary – its relationship to the historical evidence – may be in conflict with its commercial value as entertainment. . . . To rescue [a film about native life in Samoa] from financial disaster, the producers insisted on adding a prologue and retitling the film. Released as The Love Life of a South Sea Siren, Flaherty's revised documentary opened with scenes of chorus girls in grass skirts. Shortly thereafter, Flaherty fled Hollywood.
(InterPARES2, p. 11) Accuracy refers to the truthfulness of the content of the record and can only be established through content analysis. With administrative and legal records, it is usually inferred on the basis of the degree of the records' reliability and is only verified when such degree is very low. The volatility of the digital medium, the ease of change, editing, and the difficulty of version control, all make it harder to presume accuracy on the traditional bases.