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Digitization

ISO 16363:2012--Space Data and Information Transfer Systems--Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories

This ISO standard defines a recommended practice on which to base an audit and certification process for assessing the trustworthiness of digital repositories.

ISO 16363:2012 defines a recommended practice for assessing the trustworthiness of digital repositories. It is applicable to the entire range of digital repositories. ISO 16363:2012 can be used as a basis for certification.

The official ISO standard is available for purchase via the link below.

CCSDS 652.0-M-1 -- Audit and Certification of Trustworthy Digital Repositories contains the final draft standard submitted to the International Standards Organization for review and approval. It is freely available via the second link below.

SAA Council Approval/Endorsement Date: 
August 6, 2012


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MPEG Multimedia Content Description Interface (MPEG-7)

Published by International Organization for Standardization; developed by Moving Picture Experts Group.

MPEG-7, unlike MPEG-1 and MPEG-2, is a standard for the description of the content of multimedia files, rather than a format for the multimedia files themselves. It is intended to provide structures for data both for human and machine users. The standard provides “description schemes” for a wide variety of uses. In addition to the high-level descriptions of content that will allow search and browse, there are description schemes for the creation process, rights information, technical information, user history, and low-level features such as color, lighting level, and sound timbre.

 



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Australian Government Locator Service Metadata Standard (AGLS)

Maintained by the National Archives of Australia.

The AGLS Metadata Standard is a set of descriptive properties that government departments and agencies can use to improve the visibility and accessibility of their web services and linked data applications. It uses DCMI Terms properties. AGLS can be expressed either in HTML or RDF/XML. AGLS usage guidelines frequently suggest appropriate controlled vocabularies for specific properties. It has been mandated for use by Australian Government agencies.



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eXtensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XLST)

Maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) XSLT Working Group.

XSLT is one of a suite of XML-related standards from the W3C. This language is used to transform an XML document into a different XML document, or another structured document format. In the digital library and digital humanities communities, it is frequently used for mapping one metadata format to another, or for rendering a metadata record in (X)HTML for display to end users.



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eXtensible Markup Language (XML)

Maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) XML Core Working Group.

XML is a meta-language for defining markup languages for specific purposes. XML languages tend to be either “data-centric,” where XML elements are treated as structured data fields to be filled in, or “document-centric,” where a document pre-exists and XML elements are used to flag specific features of the document. The XML language itself is only one of a suite of XML-related technologies. Effective use of XML languages in information systems depends on many of these related technologies, including Xpath, XSLT, Xquery, and XML Schema language. XML grew out of and is an explicit subset of the earlier SGML specification, and provides tighter constraints on syntax intended to make machine processing of data easier.



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Visual Resources Association Core Categories (VRA Core)

Maintained by the VRA Core Oversight Committee.

The Visual Resources Association Core Categories represent an early successful effort of a professional community to develop a metadata standard tailored to its own needs. VRA Core was originally built upon the Dublin Core base, adding features needed for the description and management of visual resources. It allows for the separate description of Images, Works, and Collections, reflecting the need of image repositories to manage data about the reproductions to which they provide users access separately from the metadata about works of art, architecture, and material culture themselves. The current version of this standard is VRA Core 4.0, which features two options for implementation: “unrestricted” which defines the VRA Core data elements, and “restricted” which enforces data constraints on certain elements to predefined vocabularies or date formats.



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Text Encoding Initiative (TEI)

Maintained by the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium.

The TEI is an extensive markup language for textual materials. It is organized into “modules”—groups of markup elements that apply to different types of texts such as dictionaries and critical apparatuses, or features to be flagged within a text, such as names/dates/people places and tables/formulae/graphics. Elements in the TEI appear for both syntactic markup (pages, paragraphs, etc.) and semantic markup (names, places, etc.). TEI implementers typically use customized DTDs, W3C XML Schemas, or RelaxNG schemas to define the subset of the entire TEI language for use in a given project. The online Roma tool allows TEI implementers to generate these customized schemas for local use. In addition to the markup defined for full texts, the TEI includes a header for metadata about the text itself. TEI was first released in 1994. The current version of the TEI is known as P5.



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Qualified Dublin Core (QDC)

Maintained by the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI).

Qualified Dublin Core, also known as DC Terms, is an extension of Simple Dublin Core through the use of additional elements, element refinements, and encoding schemes. Qualified Dublin Core is seen in widely differing implementations, often using locally-defined refinements and encoding schemes. Some digital asset management systems such as CONTENTdm and DSpace operate on top of native Qualified Dublin Core models. DC Terms is the basis for most recent activity in the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, providing the fundamental properties that are used in description sets conforming to the Dublin Core Abstract Model (see DCAM).



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Preservation Metadata Implementation Strategies (PREMIS)

Maintained by the Library of Congress.

PREMIS is a data dictionary and XML Schema for the encoding of information necessary to support the digital preservation process. Its data elements are divided into 5 categories, reflecting information on the PREMIS container, objects, events, agenda, and rights. A key feature of the PREMIS model is the definition of Objects as made up of Representations, Files, and Bitstreams. Also of note is the fact that PREMIS considers Objects immutable; if an action is taken on an Object that changes it, the result is a new but related Object. PREMIS intentionally excludes format-specific technical metadata from its scope, assuming implementers will use other relevant standards for tracking this information. The Library of Congress is the official PREMIS maintenance agency.



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Public Broadcasting Core Metadata Dictionary (PB Core)

Maintained by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB).

PB Core is an extensive metadata structure supporting the description and exchange of media assets in the public broadcasting community, including both individual clips and full, edited, aired productions. Its elements are divided into sections focusing on intellectual content, intellectual property, instantiations, and extensions. PB Core is maintained under the auspices of the US Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and was influenced heavily by Dublin Core.



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