Governance Manual

SAA's Governance Maual describes the organization's structure, officers, component groups, awards program, and student chapters, and includes the Constitution and Bylaws. See Appendix A for specific policies such as guidelines for SAA Websites, use of the SAA logo, choosing Annual Meeting sites, fundraising policy, etc.

Section I: Constitution and Bylaws

Section I: Constitution of the Society of American Archivists

I. NAME

The name of this organization shall be the Society of American Archivists. The Society is incorporated as a nonprofit organization under the laws of the District of Columbia.

II. OBJECTIVES

The Society of American Archivists is a professional organization established to provide a means for effective cooperation among persons concerned with the documentation of human experience; to stimulate and to publish the results of research in archival administration and records management; to promote the adoption of sound principles and standards by all public and private agencies responsible for the preservation and administration of records; to foster a better public understanding of the nature and value of archival operations and holdings; to develop professional standards, particularly for the training of archivists, records managers, and custodians of private papers, and to improve the facilities and increase the opportunities for such training; to maintain and strengthen relations with historians, librarians, educators, public administrators, and others in allied disciplines; and to cooperate with other professional organizations, cultural and educational institutions, and international organizations having mutual interests in the preservation and use of recorded heritage.

III. MEMBERSHIP

A. There shall be several categories of membership.

1. Individual full membership shall be open to those who are or have been engaged in the custody, study, teaching, or control of records, archives, or private papers, or who wish to support the objectives of the Society. Full members are eligible to hold office in the Society; to hold any appointed position in the Society; to vote for officers, Councilors, and members of the Nominating Committee; to vote on all matters requiring a vote which come before the Society as a whole; to be members of constituent units of the Society; and to receive the benefits of the Society's programs and services.

2. Individual associate membership shall be limited to those who wish to support the objectives of the Society but who are either not professionally responsible for custody or control of records, archives, or private papers or who are not engaged in the study or teaching of archives. Associate members are eligible to be members of sections, roundtables, and task forces and to receive the benefits of the Society's programs and services.

3. Individual student membership shall be open to students in degree-conferring programs. Student members may vote for officers, Councilors, members of the Nominating Committee, and on all matters requiring a vote which come before the Society as a whole. Student members are eligible to hold any appointed position in the Society; to be members of constituent units of the Society; and to receive the benefits of the Society's programs and services.

4. Institutional membership shall be open to institutions or agencies responsible for or substantially interested in the custody, study, teaching, control, or use of records, archives, and/or private papers. Institutional members are eligible to receive the publications of the Society. Each institutional member may identify a primary contact person, who is eligible to vote, hold office, and serve on appointed groups.

5. Honorary membership, in recognition of eminent distinction in any of the fields of the Society's objectives, may be extended to any person chosen by a two-thirds vote of the full membership of the Council following nomination by at least ten (10) individual members. Honorary membership shall be for life, and honorary members shall not be required to pay dues or other assessments. They shall have all the privileges of individual full members. The number of honorary members shall not exceed ten (10) at any one time.

B. Fellows of the Society of American Archivists

To recognize sustained and outstanding achievements in pursuit of the goals of the profession and the work of the Society, there shall be a special class of individual members, known as Fellows of the Society of American Archivists, which shall consist of members elected to that class by a seventy-five percent (75%) vote of the Committee on the Selection of Fellows. The number of Fellows shall be no more than five percent (5%) of the total individual membership reported at the last annual business meeting of the Society. No member of the Society shall be elected a Fellow who has not been a full member of the Society in good standing for at least seven (7) years immediately preceding election.

IV. DUES

A member shall be enrolled upon the first payment of dues and shall receive benefits during the period for which dues have been paid. All dues shall be payable in advance. Membership in good standing shall cease when dues are 28 days in arrears. Changes in membership dues shall be determined by a majority vote of those members voting in a referendum conducted according to the bylaws of the Society.

V. GOVERNANCE AND ADMINISTRATION

A. Officers and the Council

1. Officers.

The officers of the Society shall be a President, a Vice President, and a Treasurer. The President and Vice President shall serve terms of one (1) year each and shall take office at the conclusion of the annual business meeting following the election and shall be ineligible for immediate reelection. The Vice President shall automatically become President at the conclusion of the following year's annual business meeting or in case of a vacancy in the presidency. The Treasurer shall be elected for a term of three (3) years beginning at the conclusion of the annual business meeting following the election and shall be ineligible for immediate reelection.

2. Council

a) The government of the Society, the management of its affairs, and the regulation of its procedures, except as otherwise provided in this constitution, shall be vested in a council. The Council shall consist of the President, Vice President, Treasurer, and nine (9) Councilors elected at-large by the Society. Three (3) of the nine (9) Councilors shall be elected in each annual election for terms of three (3) years. The nine (9) Councilors shall be ineligible for immediate reelection. If a vacancy shall occur among the Councilors or in any of the offices except the presidency, it may be filled by the Council according to the bylaws of the Society. The person designated shall hold the position through the end of the original term.

b) The Council shall meet at the Annual Meeting of the Society and shall hold such other meetings as it may determine. Special meetings of the Council for any purpose shall be called by the Executive Director on written request of the President or of three (3) members of the Council. Seven (7) members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. When meeting in person, a vote shall become the act of the Council on approval by a majority of those present and voting, unless otherwise required by the constitution or bylaws.

c) There shall be an Executive Committee of the Council constituted according to the bylaws of the Society.

B. Finances.

1. The Society's financial assets and activities shall be divided into funds reflecting general operations, special projects, endowments, and such other functional categories as the Council may establish from time to time. To further the aims and purposes of the profession, the Council may establish special projects funds set apart from the general operating and endowment funds and used only for the purposes for which they are or were established. The Council may establish permanent endowment funds from which only the earnings may be expended to further the aims of the Society.

2. The Council shall be responsible for policy governing investment of funds and for care of other assets of the Society. Fiscal control of the funds and assets shall be maintained by such records and accounting system as may be prescribed by the Council in accordance with the constitution, bylaws, and existing guidelines. An annual audit of the financial affairs shall be made and a report of the audit published.

C. Appointments.

The Council shall appoint an Executive Director who shall serve at its pleasure. Except when the Council or its Executive Committee is in executive session, the Executive Director shall attend the meetings of the Council, the Executive Committee, and the annual business meeting and keep their minutes, but shall not vote. The Council shall appoint the Society's archivist and may make other appointments as needed.

VI. MEETINGS

1. The Society shall hold an annual business meeting at such time and place as the Council shall determine, and special meetings may be called by a two-thirds (2/3rds) vote of the Council. Notice of each meeting of the Society shall be given by the Executive Director at least thirty (30) days before the date of the meeting. One hundred (100) individual members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a smaller number may adjourn to another date.

2. Resolutions passed at the annual business meeting or submitted in writing and signed by 1% of the eligible voting members which request the Council to take a specific action must be formally considered and voted upon by the Council in a timely fashion. The membership shall be notified of the results of that deliberation in the first communication sent to the membership following the Council's vote. If ten (10) percent of the membership disagrees with the Council's decision and files a petition to that effect with the executive office within ninety (90) days of the Council's notification, a special referendum shall be conducted within one hundred and eighty (180) days and the results of a majority vote of the members voting in this referendum shall be binding provided that at least thirty (30) percent of the eligible members shall have voted.

VII. RECORDS

The records of the Society, of the Council, and other units of the Society shall be preserved by the officers, Councilors, the Executive Director, and unit chairs, and shall be promptly turned over by them to their successors. Noncurrent records shall be appraised by direction of the Council upon recommendation of the Society's archivist, those records of continuing value shall be placed for preservation in the Society's official archives, and the Council shall determine a policy of access to these records.

VIII. PUBLICATIONS

When funds are available, the Society shall publish a journal, a newsletter, a membership directory, and other such publications as the Council may designate. All categories of membership shall be entitled to receive the journal, newsletter, and membership directory and subscriptions shall be accepted from others at such rates as may be directed by the Council.

IX. BYLAWS

  1. Adoption or amendment of bylaws as specified below may be made either by a two-thirds (2/3rds) vote of the Council or by a two-thirds (2/3rds) vote of those members voting in a referendum conducted according to the bylaws of the Society.
  2. The Council is authorized and directed to prepare, adopt, or amend such bylaws as may be desirable to regularize the administrative practices of the Society. 
  3.  Amendments to the bylaws may be recommended by a majority vote of the Council or proposed in writing by at least 5% of the eligible voting members of the Society. Amendments to be voted on by member referendum must be filed with the Executive Director at least sixty (60) days prior to the Annual Meeting. Copies of the proposed amendments shall be distributed by the Executive Director according to a method approved by the Council to eligible voting members at least thirty (30) days in advance of the Annual Meeting at which they are to be presented. 
  4. A copy of the current constitution and bylaws shall be published on the Society's website and shall be available to any member upon request to the Executive Director.

X. AMENDMENTS

Amendments to this constitution may be recommended by a majority vote of the Council or proposed in writing by at least 5% of the eligible voting members of the Society. All amendments must be filed with the Executive Director at least one hundred (100) days prior to the Annual Meeting. Copies of the proposed amendments shall be distributed by the Executive Director according to a method approved by the Council to eligible voting members at least sixty (60) days in advance of the Annual Meeting at which they are to be presented. Amendments may be adopted by a two-thirds (2/3rds) vote of those members voting in a referendum conducted according to the bylaws of the Society.

XI. DISSOLUTION

In accordance with the laws of the District of Columbia (currently 29 D.C. Code 1047), the Society may be dissolved upon the vote of two-thirds (2/3rds) of the members present and voting at a meeting called for such purpose following notification through the U.S. Postal Service at least 90 days in advance of the meeting. In the event of dissolution, the Society's property, funds, and other assets shall pass to whatever agency or agencies may be designated by the Council in office at the time of dissolution.

As amended August 1997, August 2010, August 2011, October 2016.

Section I: Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists

1. DUTIES OF OFFICERS

A. The President shall direct and coordinate the affairs of the Society, preside at all business meetings of the Society, the Council, and its Executive Committee, and shall perform such duties as may be directed by the Council. The President may vote in any meeting of the Society at which he or she presides.

B. The Vice President shall perform the duties of the President in case the President is absent or incapacitated and, in case of a vacancy in the presidency, shall assume that office and hold it for the remainder of the term.

C. The Treasurer shall be responsible for planning and formulating financial policy in consultation with the Finance Committee and the Executive Director; recommending such policies to the Council; reviewing the annual budget before its submission to the Finance Committee and to the Council; internal auditing of all Society financial operations; providing an annual report on the Society's finances; and investing special funds and endowments on the advice and consent of the Finance Committee and the Council. In the absence of the President and the Vice President, the Treasurer shall preside at business meeting(s) of the Society and meetings of the Council.

2. DUTIES OF THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Executive Director shall manage the programs and activities of the Society and its staff. The Executive Director shall assist the President in establishing the agenda for the Council's meetings.

The Executive Director shall keep the minutes of the annual business meeting, Council meetings, and Executive Committee meetings; prepare and mail notices; present at each annual business meeting a report of the activities of the Society; and perform such other duties as may be directed by the Council. The Executive Director shall have custody of and preserve the corporate seal of the Society and shall affix the seal under the direction of the President and the Council. The Executive Director shall, in consultation with the Treasurer, prepare the Society's annual budget for submission to the Executive Committee and the Council. The Executive Director shall receive and disburse all funds in the general operating budget of the Society and the funds in the various Society budgets supported by external grants, special projects, and endowments under guidelines established by the Council. Quarterly reports of all receipts and disbursements for all budgets shall be made to the Council by the Executive Director. According to guidelines established by the Council, the Executive Director shall hire, compensate, supervise, evaluate, and terminate all other persons employed by the Society.

3. COUNCIL

When the Council meets through telecommunications or electronic conference, a vote shall become the act of the Council upon the approval of a majority of all members of the Council unless otherwise required by the constitution or bylaws.

4. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

The Executive Committee of the Council shall be composed of the President, the Vice President, the Treasurer, and one councilor who shall be elected from among the councilors in their second year of service for a term of one (1) year by the nine (9) councilors at the spring meeting of the Council. The President shall serve as chair of the Executive Committee and shall call the committee into session. The Executive Committee shall act for the Council in conducting the affairs of the Society between meetings of the Council and shall provide timely communication and consultation with the Council between meetings. The Executive Committee shall annually conduct a performance review of the Executive Director according to procedures mutually agreed to by the Executive Committee and the Executive Director and approved by the Council.

5. ELECTION OF OFFICERS AND COUNCILORS

A. There shall be a Nominating Committee composed of five (5) members, two (2) of whom are selected at the spring meeting of the Council from among the councilors in their second year of service and three (3) of whom have been elected by the membership. The person receiving the most votes in the election by the membership shall serve as chair. In the event of a tie vote, the chair shall be appointed by the Vice President / President-Elect from among the three (3) elected members of the Committee.

B. The Nominating Committee shall canvass the membership for suggestions of possible nominees for the offices of Vice President, Treasurer, councilors, and Nominating Committee. The tabulated results of this advisory canvass shall be made available to any member of the Society upon request. The Nominating Committee shall try to achieve a broadly based, diverse governing body.

C. The Nominating Committee shall put forth a minimum of two (2) nominees from the eligible membership for each vacancy. The Nominating Committee shall notify the membership of the names of the nominees through the January/February issue of the Society's newsletter. An eligible member may also be placed on the ballot by submission of a petition signed by fifty (50) individual members. Such petitions must be received in the executive office by February 10.

D. The Nominating Committee shall issue an official ballot containing names of the candidates whom it has named, the candidates who have been nominated by petition, and blank space for write-in candidates. The ballot shall be accompanied by brief biographical sketches of the nominees and responses to questions posed by the nominating committee. Candidates may add a brief statement of the issues facing the Society and how they intend to deal with those issues.

E. Ballots shall be distributed to all eligible voting members according to a method and schedule approved by the Council. If no candidate for a vacancy receives a plurality of at least forty (40) percent of the membership voting, the Nominating Committee will conduct a run-off election via mail ballot under terms determined by the Council. In the event of a tie vote for the office of Vice President, both candidates will be deemed to have been elected and will serve successive terms. The Council will determine by lot which candidate will serve as Vice President in the first and as President in the second year. The other candidate will serve as Vice President in the second year and as President in the third year. In the event of a tie vote that affects the outcome of the election for any other office, the Council will determine by lot which candidate will serve.

F. All votes shall be tallied by at least three (3) individual members of the Society. The ballots and the tabulated results shall then be given to the Executive Director who shall immediately notify all candidates of election results. The names of the new officers, councilors, and members of the Nominating Committee shall be published online and in the next issue of the Society's newsletter and announced publicly at the annual business meeting. A member may obtain the vote count from the executive office of the Society.

G. In filling a vacancy for any councilor or officer other than the president under the terms of Article V., Section A.2.a., of the constitution, the Council shall balance the will of the voting membership expressed in the most recent election cycle, the need for familiarity with issues being addressed by the Council, and the amount of time remaining in the term of the vacancy to be filled.

6. ORGANIZATIONAL UNITS

A. Except as otherwise specified in the constitution and/or bylaws, committees, boards, task forces, working groups, sections, roundtables, and other units shall be created and terminated by the President with the advice and approval of the Council. Chairs of committees, boards, task forces, and working groups shall be appointed by the Vice President / President-Elect for terms of one year and may be appointed to a maximum of three consecutive terms except for such bodies for which the term and means of selection of chair are otherwise specified in the constitution and/or bylaws of the Society. Each committee, board, task force, working group, or other unit shall have guidelines approved and amended as necessary by the Council that set forth its purpose, size, composition, means of selection and length of terms of members and chair, reporting procedures, and duties and responsibilities. Each section shall select its own leaders and shall adopt bylaws defining its own governance provided that no section bylaw may be in conflict with the constitution, bylaws, or guidelines of the Society. Each roundtable shall select its own leaders and shall operate in accordance with guidelines approved and amended as necessary by the Council.

B. Student chapters may be initiated in academic institutions and approved by the Council. Each student chapter shall select its own leaders and adopt bylaws defining its own governance, provided that no student chapter bylaw may be in conflict with the constitution, bylaws, or guidelines of the Society.

7. GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE

In the event of grievances as specified below, there shall be a Personnel Grievance Committee. The Committee shall be composed of five members, each of whom must have served the Society as a councilor or as an elected officer within the past five years, but who may not be serving in such capacity at the time of the work of the Committee. Two members of the Committee shall be chosen by the Council, two members by the Executive Director, and the fifth member by decision of the first four members chosen. The fifth member will serve as chair of the Committee. The Committee shall hear grievances 1) between the Executive Director and the Council, 2) between the Executive Director and a staff member, and 3) such other grievances as may be referred to it by the Council. The decision of the Personnel Grievance Committee concerning matters involving the Executive Director shall be binding upon the parties to the dispute, provided that the decision is in accordance with applicable federal and state laws and the constitution and bylaws of the Society.

8. GUIDELINES

The Council is authorized and directed to prepare, adopt, or amend such administrative guidelines, policies, and procedures as may be desirable to regularize the functions and operations of the Society's committees, task forces, boards, sections, roundtables, representatives, awards, programs, and other activities. Adoption or amendment of a guideline requires approval by a majority of the Council. No part of the guidelines may conflict with the Society's constitution or bylaws. The guidelines shall be maintained by the Executive Director, and a copy of the current guidelines shall be available to any member upon request to the Executive Director.

9. PARLIAMENTARY PROCEDURE

Robert's Rules of Order (latest revised edition) shall govern the proceedings of the Society, except as otherwise provided for in the constitution, bylaws, and special rules of the Society.

10. RULES OF BUSINESS MEETING

At the beginning of the Society's annual business meeting, the President shall present the following rules for adoption by a majority vote of those members present and voting. Once adopted, the rules may be suspended or amended only by a two-thirds (2/3rds) majority of members present and voting unless such suspension or amendment conflicts with the Society's constitution or bylaws. Notice of the rules of the business meeting shall be made in writing to all meeting registrants through their registration packets.

a) Full members, student members, and honorary members may vote at the Society's business meetings. Each institutional member may identify a primary contact person who is eligible to vote.

b) In any question of the membership status of an individual, the executive office roster of members for the month in which the annual meeting begins will be definitive.

c) All members may participate in discussions at the business meeting.

d) Nonmembers may speak by general consent of the membership; if a member calls into question the participation by a nonmember, the chair will ask for a vote by the members present. A simple majority will provide consent to speak.

e) Persons seeking recognition from the chair shall identify themselves for the record, giving their names, institutional or other affiliation, and whether they are members or nonmembers.

f) One hundred (100) individual members constitute a quorum.

g) Debate shall be limited to five minutes for each speaker; no speaker may have the floor twice until all who wish to speak have spoken.

h) All resolutions to be brought before the business meeting for action shall be submitted in writing to the Executive Director no later than noon of the day preceding the business meeting and shall be available to members at the meeting. Resolutions from the floor may be considered by majority vote, except as required by the Constitution.

i) At the beginning of the meeting the President will announce the agenda, call for additions or amendments, and call for a vote to approve the agenda. After the agenda has been adopted by the majority of the members present and voting, it can be departed from only by the general consent or by two-thirds vote if any members request a vote.

j) Proxy votes are not permitted.

k) Aside from the rules above, Robert's Rules of Order (latest revised edition) will govern the business meeting.

11. MEMBER REFERENDA

A. Member dues changes and resolution of motions filed with the Executive Director in accordance with Article IX or Article X of the Constitution shall be determined by member referendum.

B. The Council Executive Committee shall review and approve a briefing paper prior to the constitutionally specified distribution date for presentation of the motion for dues changes and constitution or bylaws amendments at the Annual Meeting.

C. Copies of proposed member dues changes, constitution or bylaws amendments, and briefing papers, prepared by the proposer(s) and/or by the Executive Director in accordance with Council guidelines, shall be distributed in accordance with Articles IX and X of the Constitution and shall be presented at the annual business meeting. Presentation shall include information regarding the timing of the referendum on the proposed dues change or amendment, as specified in F. and G. of this bylaw.

D. All members shall be given the opportunity to participate in discussion and debate on items presented for referendum.

E. Notice of the referendum, along with copies of the documents specified in C., shall be distributed by the Executive Director according to a method approved by the Council to eligible voting members.

F. For dues changes and amendments proposed under Articles IX. and X. of the constitution that are determined by the Council to be time sensitive, the notice of the referendum specified in E. shall occur no more than thirty (30) days after the meeting at which the motion is presented. Ballots shall be distributed to eligible voting members according to a method approved by the Council no fewer than sixty (60) days and no more than ninety (90) days after the meeting.

G. For amendments proposed under Articles IX. and X. of the constitution that are determined by the Council not to be time sensitive, the notice of the referendum specified in E. shall occur no fewer than sixty (60) days prior to the availability of ballots for the annual election of officers, councilors, and elected members of the Nominating Committee. The referendum on such amendments shall be included as part of this annual ballot.

H. Approval of motions shall be determined by a majority vote for dues changes and by a two-thirds (2/3rds) vote for proposed amendments to the Constitution and Bylaws of those members voting in the referendum, provided that at least ten (10) percent of the eligible voting members shall have voted. A member may obtain the vote count from the Executive Director.

As amended November 3, 2006; August 10, 2009; August 27, 2011; June 3, 2016; October 28, 2016.

Section II. Officers

A. Composition1

  1. The elected officers of the Society are a president, a vice president, and a treasurer.
  2. The president and the vice president serve terms of one year each. The treasurer serves a term of three years.
  3. Officers take office at the conclusion of the annual business meeting following the election. They are ineligible for immediate reelection.

B. Duties

  1. Together with the Council, the officers are responsible for the following2:
    1. Ensuring the legal and ethical integrity of the organization.
    2. Providing proper financial oversight and ensuring adequate financial resources.
    3. Establishing policy for the Society.
    4. Ensuring effective planning.
    5. Monitoring and strengthening programs and services.
    6. Ensuring the organization’s public standing.
    7. Supporting the work of the paid staff.
    8. Selecting, supporting, and evaluating the executive director
  2. Together with the executive director, the officers are responsible for ensuring that records of continuing value to the Society are transferred to the Society’s archives.3

C. Other

  1. Elected officers of the Society will not serve as officers, steering committee members, or editors on other SAA bodies except where this service is specifically mandated.4
  2. Elected officers of the Society will not concurrently serve as paid employees of SAA, except to complete pre-existing contracts.5

Approved by the Council: June 1991
Revised: July 2013 


1 The source for Section II.A. is the Constitution of the Society of American Archivists, Article V.A.1.

2 This list of duties is based on Richard T. Ingram, Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards, Second Edition (BoardSource, 2009).

3 The source for Section II.B.2. is the Constitution of the Society of American Archivists, Article VII.

4 Per resolution adopted by the Council at its January 30-February 1, 1987, meeting and reaffirmed at the June 2-4, 1989 meeting.

5 Per resolution adopted by the Council at its June 5-7, 1987, meeting and reaffirmed at its June 2-4, 1989 meeting.

President

A. Term of Office

Article V of the Society's constitution states that the president serves a one-year term of office subsequent to a one-year term of office as vice president. The terms of office begin at the conclusion of the Annual Business Meeting after the election. Because the vice president automatically becomes president, the president is ineligible for immediate reelection. According to the SAA Foundation's bylaws, the SAA president also serves on the SAA Foundation Board of Directors in his or her capacity as an SAA Executive Committee member. Subsequent to serving one year as SAA president, the SAA immediate past president serves one year on the SAA Foundation Board of Directors.

B. Functions

Bylaw 1 of the Society's bylaws states, "The president shall direct and coordinate the affairs of the Society, preside at all business meetings of the Society, of the Council, and its Executive Committee, and shall perform such duties as may be directed by the Council."

C. Duties

1. Preside over the Society's business meeting at the Annual Meeting.

2. Serve as a member of and preside over meetings of the Council.

3. Serve as a member of and chair the Executive Committee. The president shall call the Committee into session.

4. May at his or her discretion appoint the chairs and the members of SAA committees, boards, task forces, and working groups, as well as representatives whose positions are created or become vacant during his or her term in office, according to the guidelines for each of these and SAA practice. Traditionally, the vice president / president-elect appoints representatives and chairs and members of SAA bodies who will commence their service at the beginning of his or her term as president. In general, the vice president fills vacancies occurring in mid-year in consultation with the president.

5. Create and terminate standing committees, task forces, and other groups with the advice and approval of the Council.

6. Direct representatives to outside committees and boards to present issues of importance or concern to the president, the executive director, the Council, or the Society at large before those committees and boards. The representatives shall bring the discussion of such issues by the outside committees and boards before the Executive Committee or the full Council for consideration and further advice.

7. Sign the current employment contract with the executive director.

8. Direct the search for a new executive director when necessary.

9. Appoint newly-elected Council members to Council committees.

 

Approved by Council: June 1991
Revised: January 1992, May 2011

Vice President

A. Term of Office

Article V of the Society's constitution states that the vice president is elected and serves a one-year term of office. The term of office begins at the conclusion of the Annual Business Meeting after the election. The vice president shall automatically become president at the conclusion of the following year's Annual Meeting. According to the SAA Foundation's Bylaws, SAA vice president also serves on the SAA Foundation Board of Directors in his or her capacity as an SAA Executive Committee member.

B. Functions

Bylaw 1 of the Society's bylaws states "The vice president shall perform the duties of the president in case the president is absent or incapacitated and, in case of a vacancy in the presidency, shall assume that office and hold it for the remainder of the term."

C. Duties

1. Serve as a member of the Executive Committee.

2. Serve as a member of the Council.

3. In the absence of the president, preside at business meeting(s) of the Society and meetings of the Council.

4. Appoint the chairs and members of SAA committees, boards, task forces, working groups, and representatives according to the guidelines for each of these and SAA practice. Traditionally, the vice president / president-elect appoints representatives, chairs, and members of SAA bodies who will commence their service at the beginning of his or her term as president. The vice president fills vacancies occurring in mid-year in consultation with the president.

5. Appoint the chair and members of the Program Committee for the meeting over which he/she will preside as president.

6. Appoint the chair and members of the Host Committee for the meeting over which he/she will preside as president.

7. The vice president / president-elect appoints the chair of the Nominating Committee in the event of a tie for that office, according to the procedures in Bylaw 5.A.

Approved by Council: June 1991
Revised: January 1992, May 2011

Treasurer

A. Term of Office

Article V of the Society's constitution states that the treasurer shall be elected for a term of three (3) years beginning at the conclusion of the Annual Business Meeting following the election and shall be ineligible for immediate reelection. According to the SAA Foundation's bylaws, the SAA treasurer also serves on the SAA Foundation Board of Directors in his or her capacity as an SAA Executive Committee member.

B. Functions

Bylaw 1 of the Society states, "The treasurer shall be responsible for: planning and formulating financial policy in consultation with the Finance Committee and the Executive Director; recommending such policies to the Council; reviewing the annual budget before its submission to the Finance Committee and to the Council; internal auditing of all Society financial operations; providing an annual report on the Society's finances; and investing special funds and endowments on the advice and consent of the Finance Committee and the Council. In the absence of the president and vice president, the treasurer shall preside at business meeting(s) of the Society and meetings of the Council."

C. Duties

1. Serve as chair of the Finance Committee.

2. Prepare an annual treasurer's report. Present the report at the Annual Business Meeting and submit it for publication in The American Archivist.

3. In consultation with the Finance Committee and the Executive Director, recommend an annual budget to the Council.

4. Analyze all SAA financial statements. Report financial status, trends, and problems at each Council meeting. Make recommendations to the Executive Director and the Council.

5. Consult with the SAA office to assure that an annual audit is performed. Analyze audit results and report findings to the Council.

6. Working with the Finance Committee, oversee investment policy for special funds and endowments.

7. Hold the Society's copy of the current employment contract with the executive director.

8. Ensure that the annual giving program is undertaken by the executive director.

9. In the absence of the president and vice president, preside at business meeting(s) of the Society and meetings of the Council.

10. Work with the Council, the Finance Committee, and the executive director to achieve a balanced annual budget and an adequate reserve fund.

11. Together with the Council, approve all SAA proposals for external financial support before submission to the funding agencies.

12. Together with the Finance Committee and the Council, triennially review the dues structure to assure its sufficiency.

13. Serve as a member of the Executive Committee.

Approved by Council: June 1991; revised August 2009.

Section III. Executive Committee

A. Composition

  1. The Executive Committee is composed of the president, vice president, treasurer, and one third-year Council member who is elected annually by the nine Council members for a term of one year.1
  2. Executive Committee members also serve on the SAA Foundation Board of Directors.2

B. Duties3

  1. Act for the Council in conducting the affairs of the Society between meetings of the Council. The president will chair the Committee and convene its sessions.
  2. Approve the selection of the auditor and investment consultant(s).4
  3. Conduct an annual performance review of the executive director according to procedures mutually agreed to by the Executive Committee and the executive director.
  4. Review and approve briefing papers, prepared by the proposer(s) and/or by the executive director in accordance with Council guidelines, which will be presented with motions for constitutional and/or bylaws amendments at the Annual Business Meeting or at a special meeting called by the Council.5
  5. Determine the annual level of compensation for the SAA staff within the policy guidelines established by the Council.
  6. Reveiw and respond to appeals made in response to actions reltated to Code of Conduct violations.6

Approved by the Council: June 1991
Revised: May 2011, January 2012, July 2013, July 2014


1 The source for Section III.A.1 is the Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists, Bylaw 4.

2 The source for Section III.A.2 is the Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists Foundation, Article V, Section 5.2.1.

3 Unless otherwise noted, the source for Section III.B is the Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists, Bylaw 4.

4 Regarding investments, the Executive Committee acts in conjunction with the Finance Committee as specified in that Committee’s charge.

5 The language in Section III.B.1.d mirrors Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists, Bylaw 11, which originated as a proposed bylaw amendment adopted by Council at the May 24-26, 2011 meeting and approved by the membership at the August 2011 Annual Business Meeting.

6 SAA's Code of Conduct was adopted by the Council in an online vote in July 2014. A review cycle concurrent with that of SAA's Equal Opportunity/Non-Discrimination Policy was put in place, as well as a process for addressing violations.

Section IV. Council

A. General

  1. The Council is the elected governing body of the Society of American Archivists. Together with the Society's officers and the executive director, it is responsible for SAA’s governance, legal compliance, and financial well-being. 
  2. Council members must be willing and able to attend all meetings of the SAA Council.
  3. Council members are required annually to complete and file with the executive director a conflict-of-interest disclosure statement.
  4. Council members may not serve as an officer, chair, or member of an SAA committee, board, section steering committee or roundtable steering committee, as editor of The American Archivist or publications editor, or as an official representative to an external organization (except where this service is mandated by the SAA constitution or bylaws or where the Council delegates such service to an officer or Council member).1

 B. Composition2

  1. The Council consists of the president, vice president / president-elect, treasurer, and nine Councilors elected at-large by voting members of the Society.
  2. Three of the nine Councilors are elected in each annual election for terms of three years. Councilors are ineligible for immediate reelection.
  3. If a vacancy occurs among the Councilors or in any of the offices except the presidency, it may be filled by the Council.  The persons designated will hold the position until the next annual election, at which time the position will be filled by election for the remainder of the term, if any.

C. Functions

The Council is responsible for the following3:

  1. Ensuring the legal and ethical integrity of the organization.
  2. Providing proper financial oversight and ensuring adequate financial resources.
  3. Establishing policy for the Society.
  4. Ensuring effective planning.
  5. Monitoring and strengthening programs and services.
  6. Ensuring the organization’s public standing.
  7. Supporting the work of the paid staff.

D. Duties

  1. Provide leadership and direction for the Society and its component groups to ensure achievement of SAA’s goals. 
    1. Develop, monitor, and report on SAA’s Strategic Plan.
    2. Communicate actively and transparently with members about SAA business and the Council’s actions using appropriate media. 
    3. Communicate with component groups on aspects of the Strategic Plan that affect them and/or on which they can provide support. 
    4. Advise the executive director and senior staff on the archives environment and on major policies relating to Society programs.
    5. Call special meetings of the Society as needed. 
    6. Recommend, by a majority vote, amendments to the Society's constitution.4
    7. Prepare, adopt, or amend SAA’s bylaws.5
    8. Formally consider and vote on all resolutions of the business meeting which request the Council take a specific action. Notify the membership of the results of the deliberation.
  2. Ensure the financial stability and growth of the organization.
    1. Review and approve the Society’s annual operational plans and budget. 
    2. Provide members with information about the sources and expenditure of SAA funds.
    3. Provide for and publish an annual audit of SAA’s financial affairs. 
    4. Review the dues structure at least every three years. 
    5. Approve all requests for external funding.
    6. Consider the budget requests of SAA component groups and incorporate approved expenditures into the Society’s annual budget.
    7. Acting through the Executive Committee, hire the executive director, participate in the annual review of the executive director’s performance, and provide direction as needed. 
    8. Approve any relocation of the SAA office.
    9. Dispose of SAA’s property, funds, or other assets in the event of the dissolution of the Society.
  3. Establish, review, and approve SAA policies.
    1. Consider policy revisions recommended by component groups, representatives to external organizations, members, and staff.
    2. With advice from the executive director, establish policies and approve key decisions related to the location and conduct of the Annual Meeting.
  4. Provide oversight, stay informed, and ask questions.
    1. As assigned, serve as liaisons to SAA component groups, including boards, committees, task forces, working groups, roundtables, and sections. 
    2. With regard to component groups:  Review annual reports; develop additional activities, tasks, and recommendations; and create and terminate. 
    3. Elect three Fellows to one-year terms on the Committee on the Selection of Fellows. 
  5. Build and coordinate Society relationships with individuals and groups outside the Society.
    1. Communicate with external groups on matters of mutual interest, including aspects of the Strategic Plan that affect them and/or on which they might provide support.
    2. With regard to representatives to external organizations:  Review annual reports; develop additional activities, tasks, and recommendations; and create and terminate. 
  6. Manage the Council's own work meetings and activities.
    1. Distribute all Council meeting materials to SAA members per a Council-approved schedule. 
    2. Establish policies and procedures for Council work.  Periodically review the cost and effectiveness of Council activities and governance. 
    3. Conduct all Council meetings in open session.  Enter into executive (i.e., closed) session only upon a two-thirds majority vote of those Council members present and only to discuss specific agenda items.
    4. Assign specific work to Council members:
      • First-year class:  Plans the Leadership Orientation and Forum held at the Annual Meeting.
      • Second-year class:  Reviews the Governance Manual and recommends updates for Council approval.
      • Third-year class: The Council elects one of the three third-year individuals to serve a one-year term on the Executive Committee.6 The other two third-year members are appointed to one-year terms on the Nominating Committee.

Approved by the Council: June 1991
Revised by Council: February 2003, May 2010, August 2010, January 2012, July 2013


1 Per a resolution adopted at the January 30-February 1, 1987, meeting of the Council, reaffirmed at the June 2-4, 1989, meeting, and amended at the June 11-14, 1992, and August 28, 2001, meetings.

2 Per Article V. of the SAA constitution.

3 Derived from Richard T. Ingram, Ten Basic Responsibilities of Nonprofit Boards, Second Edition (BoardSource 2009).

4 The process for amending the SAA constitution is spelled out in X. Amendments.

5 The process for creating and amending the SAA bylaws is spelled out in Article IX. of the constitution.

6 See Bylaw 4.

SAA Council Liaisons to the Archives and Archivists (A&A) List

I. Purpose

The Council liaisons to the Archives and Archivists (A&A) List monitor the List regularly for issues of potential interest or concern to the Council. Issues may include SAA business, the content of messages, technical concerns, or other matters.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The incoming SAA President shall appoint two Council members annually - one serving in his/her second year and one serving in his/her third year on the Council - to serve as liaisons to the A&A List.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

The liaisons monitor the Archives and Archivists List on a regular basis sufficient to identify in a timely manner issues of potential interest or concern to the SAA Council. Issues are referred to the President for forwarding to the Council as appropriate. Should the president or the Council agree that a response is necessary and appropriate, the Council liaisons are responsible for drafting a response for posting to the List.

IV. Reporting Procedures

As appropriate, the Liaisons may refer matters to the SAA president, the SAA Executive Committee, and/or the SAA staff.

Approved by Council: February 8, 2008

SAA Council Subcommittee to Review/Revise Governance Manual

I. Purpose

The Council Subcommittee to Review/Revise the Governance Manual reviews and revises the Governance Manual, taking as its charge both identifying long-needed updates and ensuring that new Council actions are reflected quickly in the relevant sections of the Manual.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The subcommittee shall consist of the Council's three second-year members.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Council Subcommittee reports to the SAA Council.

Approved by Council: August 25, 2008

SAA Council Personnel Grievance Committee

According to the SAA Bylaws, 7.: "In the event of grievances as specified below, there shall be a personnel grievance committee."

"The committee shall hear grievances:

  1. Between the executive director and the Council,
  2. Between the executive director and a staff member, and
  3. Such other grievances as may be referred to it by the Council."

"The decision of the personnel grievance committee concerning matters involving the executive director shall be binding upon the parties to the dispute, provided that the decision is in accordance with applicable federal and state laws and the constitution and by-laws of the Society."

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

"The committee shall be composed of five members, each of whom must have served the Society as a councilor or as an elected officer within the past five years, but who may not be serving in such capacity at the time of the work of the committee. Two members of the committee shall be chosen by the Council, two members by the executive director, and the fifth member by decision of the first four members chosen. The fifth member will serve as chair of the committee."

The Personnel Grievance Committee reports to the SAA Council.

Section V. Executive Director

A. Duties1

  1. Administration
    1. Administers the Society’s affairs; manages the SAA staff; provides support to the officers, the Council, and component groups; and coordinates SAA interactions with outside organizations.
    2. Informs the officers, Executive Committee, and Council of the condition of the Society and all important factors influencing it.
    3. Plans, formulates and recommends to the Council policies and programs that will further the objectives of the Society.
    4. Executes contracts and commitments authorized by the Council or by established policies of the Society.
    5. Attends all meetings of the Council and of the Executive Committee as a nonvoting member, records the minutes of each body and distributes them in a timely way, and executes all decisions of the Council unless other provision is made by the Council.
    6. Presents an annual report on the activities of the Society at the Annual Meeting and records and distributes the minutes of the Annual Business Meeting.
    7. Directs and coordinates all approved programs, projects, and major activities of the staff and contractors.
    8. Recruits, hires, trains, evaluates, and motivates SAA staff; defines their working hours, salaries, and benefits, and duties; and establishes performance standards and  conducts performance reviews.
    9. Prior to the development of a new staff position(s), develops a position description and statement of its financial implications for the approval of the Council or, between Council meetings, the Executive Committee.
    10. Maintains and provides security for the Society’s records, information, and property.
    11. Maintains custody of and preserves the corporate seal of the Society, and affixes the seal.
  2. Member Relations
    1. Promotes whenever possible interest and active participation in the Society's activities and affairs on the part of its members.
    2. Directs the staff in the maintenance of member records and in billing for and collection of dues.
    3. Provides liaison and staff support to component group leaders.
    4. Conducts research, undertakes projects, prepares reports, and publishes the results on subjects of importance to the Society.
    5. Reports to SAA members the activities of elected officers, the Executive Committee, and the Council, and of members of the Society, through the communications media of the Society.
    6. Maintains personal contact with members to the extent possible.
    7. Upon written request of a member, provides a copy of any forms submitted to the IRS relating to SAA's status as a 501(c) organization.
  3. Finances
    1. With the treasurer, manages the Society’s finances.
    2. Develops and recommends an annual budget and, upon its approval by the Council, operates the Society's financial affairs within the budget.
    3. Develops and implements an organizational structure for the staff that will meet internal needs.  Recommendations on changes in staff compensation are submitted to the Executive Committee for its approval prior to submission of the annual budget to the Council.
    4. Ensures that all funds, physical assets, and other properties of the Society are appropriately safeguarded and administered.
    5. With the approval of the Council, seeks external funding to support appropriate projects of the Society, and administers and accounts for such funding to the Society and to the agency or body granting it.
  4. Professional Relations
    1. Establishes and maintains good relationships with allied professional organizations, public service organizations, industries, and public officials and bodies at local, state, and national levels.
    2. Monitors the activities of the federal, state, and local governments that are of interest to or affect archivists individually or the profession generally, and reports these activities to the Council and the membership.
    3. Coordinates the delivery to public officials and others of SAA testimony and position statements on issues of concern to the profession and SAA.
    4. When authorized by the Council, or by the Executive Committee when time will not allow for a full Council decision, represents SAA on matters of concern to the Society and the profession.
  5. General
    1. Plans and implements the Society’s Annual Meeting within budget parameters, working with and providing necessary support to the Program Committee and the Host Committee.
    2. Plans, promotes, and administers other meetings of the Society, the Council, the Executive Committee, or other Society bodies.
    3. Establishes, directs, and maintains revenue-generating programs on behalf of the Society.

B. SAA Foundation

The SAA Executive Director also serves as executive director of the SAA Foundation (unless the Foundation executive director position is filled by another individual).2

C. Review

The Executive Committee is required to conduct a performance review of the executive director annually according to procedures mutually agreed to by the Executive Committee and the executive director.3

 

Approved by the Council: June 1991
Revised: September 1994, May 2011, July 2013


1 The source for Section V.A. is the Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists, Bylaw 2, and directives from the Council.

2 The source for Section V.C.1 is the Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists Foundation, Bylaw V.

3 The source for section V.D.1 is the Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists, Bylaw 4.

Section VI. Membership Categories

Categories of SAA membership are defined in Section III.A. of SAA’s constitution: http://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section1/constitution.

Benefits of SAA membership are described on the "Member Benefits" page: http://www2.archivists.org/membership.

Approved by the Council: August 2006
Revised: July 2013 

Section VII: Committees and Boards

A. Purpose 1

  1. The SAA Council establishes standing committees and boards to provide ongoing oversight and guidance on, and perform specified tasks related to, functional areas of importance to the Society’s programs and members.
  2. The Council approves descriptions for each SAA committee and board stating its purpose, reporting procedures, and duties and responsibilities, and including specific information about its selection, size, length of terms, and meetings. The descriptions are intended to ensure that the purpose and goals of each committee and board are clear and to promote continuity and consistency in the Society's work. Each committee and board uses the description as a source of guidance for its activities.
  3. The copy of record of these descriptions for each committee and board is maintained on the SAA website. Committees and boards work through their Council liaison to recommend any needed revisions to these descriptions.

B. Membership

  1. Appointments to standing committees and boards generally are made by the vice president / president-elect in the months preceding the SAA Annual Meeting and take effect at the close of the Annual Meeting. Membership on committees and boards is open to all SAA members. Further details on appointments are specified on the SAA website for a specific committee or board.
  2. Unless otherwise stated in the description on the SAA website for a specific committee or board, appointments are for three-year terms and may be renewed.
  3. To encourage participation in the work of a committee or board by those who seek to gain expertise in that area, interns may be appointed to committees and boards. Interns, who are appointed by the vice president / president-elect in consultation with the chair, serve as nonvoting members for a term of one year and are expected to attend the SAA Annual Meeting and assist in the work of the group throughout the year.
  4. The process for the removal of a non-participating committee or board member is specified in the Policy for Removing a Non-Participating Member from a Council-Appointed Group.

C. Consultation and Reporting

  1. Committees and boards work closely with their Council liaisons to ensure that they are responsive to the needs of the Society.
  2. Each committee or board, like all SAA groups, is required to present an annual report for review by the Council. The chair is responsible for coordinating the submission of an annual report. Budget requests must be submitted as part of the annual report, which must be filed with the SAA Executive Director within 90 days of the close of the annual meeting. Annual reports must use the Council Report Template. The annual report should be a brief summary of the group’s activities in the preceding year, and may raise issues or questions about which the group desires Council feedback.
  3. The chair is responsible for ensuring that minutes or reports of meetings are prepared if these are warranted. Minutes or reports should be posted on the committee’s or board’s SAA website to inform SAA members of its activities.

D. Meetings and External Resources

  1. Standing committees and boards meet at the Annual Meeting. The work of most committees is best facilitated if both incoming and outgoing members are invited to participate in this meeting. The chair prepares and distributes in advance an agenda for the meeting.
  2. The standard expectation is that a committee’s or board’s work outside of the Annual Meeting will be done utilizing emails, conference calls (supported by the SAA office), and free tools. SAA support for in-person, mid-year meetings of committees and boards is severely restricted due to limited financial resources. Committee and board chairs should discuss requests for such funding with their Council liaisons and the executive director.
  3. If a committee or board wishes to seek resources (whether cash or in kind) from any source outside SAA, Executive Committee approval must be obtained in every instance before approaching the source. Proposals should be routed through the executive director and Council liaison, with sufficient time for consideration by the Executive Committee, which will respond within 30 days.

Adopted by the Council: January 1995
Revised: July 2013

 


1 The source for Sections VII.A and B. is the Bylaws of the Society of American Archivists, Bylaw 6.

ALA/SAA/AAM Committee on Archives, Libraries, and Museums (CALM) (Affiliated Group)

I. Purpose

Revised in January 2003, the charge of the joint committee is:

  1. To foster and develop ways and means of effecting closer cooperation among the organizations;
  2. To encourage the establishment of common standards;
  3. To undertake such activities as are assigned to the committee by any of its parent bodies;
  4. To initiate programs of a relevant and timely nature at the annual meetings of one or more parent bodies either through direct combined committee sponsorship or by forwarding particular program plans to the appropriate unit of one or more parent bodies for action; and
  5. To refer matters of common concern to appropriate committees of ALA, SAA, or AAM.

The ALA/SAA/AAM Joint Committee on Archives, Libraries, and Museums consists of 15 members, five from each association, with co-chairs appointed by each association biennially for two-year terms.

See also: The CALM Wiki

American Archivist Editorial Board

I. Purpose

The Editorial Board advises and assists the Editor of The American Archivist in the editorial review and production of the journal and in establishing and implementing editorial policies and procedures for peer review of submitted manuscripts.

The Editorial Board also assists with the evaluation of the Journal Editor as requested by the Council.

II. Board Size, Length of Terms, and Selection

The Editorial Board consists of the Editor, who serves as chair of the board, the Reviews Editor, and eight individual board members.

The Editor is appointed by the Council. The Editor's term is three years and customarily begins on or about January 1; however, the exact date on which the individual selected assumes the responsibilities of editorship is negotiated by the individual and the Executive Director. An incumbent Editor may be re-appointed for one additional term as Editor. An individual may not serve more than two consecutive terms, but may apply for the position at a later time.

The Reviews Editor is appointed for a three-year term by the Editor. The Reviews Editor may serve no more than two consecutive terms.  The Reviews Editor is selected based on demonstrated excellent writing and editorial skills and knowledge of current research and writing in the archives field.

The eight individuals comprising the board are appointed for four-year terms that are staggered so that one-fourth are appointed each year. Board members are nominated by the Editor and appointed by the SAA Vice President based on the list of nominees.  In the event that the Vice President is unable to appoint a person nominated by the Editor, the Vice President asks the Editor to nominate another person for appointment.  Individuals serving on the Editorial Board are selected because of their knowledge of archival theory, methodology, and practice; expertise in research strategies and methodologies; and experience in archival research and publication.

The Editorial Board also reflects a diversity of archival institutions and functional expertise and the demographic and geographic breadth of the profession.  An individual may serve no more than two consecutive terms on the board.

The chair of the Publications Board serves as an ex officio member of the Editorial Board.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

A. The Editor

The Editor coordinates Editorial Board activities. To maintain the editorial independence of the journal as a peer-refereed professional journal, the Editor manages the manuscript review process and makes final decisions for publication. The Editor is responsible for the solicitation, selection, peer review, and final approval of articles, features, and photographs. He or she works with authors and prospective authors on necessary revisions, reviews page proofs before publication, and works closely with the Reviews Editor, a copyeditor, an indexer, and the SAA staff, who handle journal production and business matters.

The Editor uses the Editorial Board listserv as the principal means of communication with the Editorial Board about editorial activities, including, but not limited to, statistical summary of submissions and decisions about submissions, negotiations for special issues, special achievements, problems and needs, and suggestions for Editorial Board policies.

The Editor also serves as an ex officio member of the Publications Board.

B. Reviews Editor

The Reviews Editor works in conjunction with the Editor to commission review essays; selects books and exhibits (print and online) to review; assembles, maintains, and refreshes a stable of reviewers; assigns items to be reviewed and oversees the reviews process; and edits copy for the reviews section in each issue of the journal.

C. Individual Board Members

Individual Editorial Board members assist the Editor in developing and implementing editorial policies and procedures, soliciting manuscripts to be considered for publication in The American Archivist, recommending other manuscript reviewers, reviewing manuscript submissions for possible publication in the journal, and contributing as needed with reviews of professional literature and resources.

Individual board members also assist with the review of the Editor’s performance and may assist in the search for a new Editor.

D. SAA Office

The SAA office coordinates production aspects of the journal and handles business matters, including:

  • Physical and digital production;
  • Content licensing;
  • Coordination of cover art;
  • Advertising sales;
  • Subscriptions and claims;
  • Providing reports to assist the Editorial Board in accomplishing its goals;
  • Coordinating communication with and among Editorial Board members and with SAA members at large;
  • Ensuring the production and distribution of Editorial Board meeting minutes; and
  • Negotiating contracts with vendors.

IV. Meetings

The Editorial Board meets at least annually during SAA’s Annual Meeting.

The SAA Executive Director, Director of Publishing, and Editorial and Production Coordinator customarily participate in all meetings of the Editorial Board.

V. Budget

The Council, as part of its budget process, approves the budget (prepared by the SAA office) for The American Archivist.

VI. Reporting and Editor Performance Evaluation Procedures

The Editor reports to the Council. The Editor submits a report three times a year in advance of each Council meeting. The report includes a summary of the Editor’s activities, the production of the journal, issues and concerns, and any changes to editorial policies and procedures.

The following procedures apply to the annual performance evaluation of the Editor, which isbased on performance criteria, goals and objectives, and a formal review process. The purpose of this process is to form a basis for considering renewal of the Editor’s contract, to provide feedback to the Editor, to discuss issues of common concern, and to recognize achievements. The Executive Director establishes a schedule for this evaluation process based on a timetable for renegotiation of the contract with the Editor.

The Executive Director shares with the Editor the statement of criteria for performance evaluation, stipulating elements considered appropriate and relevant for evaluating the Editor's performance on an annual basis. This statement must be reviewed and approved by the Council.

The Executive Director solicits written and/or oral comments on the Editor’s performance from the Editorial Board, Council liaison, various SAA staff, three authors who have recently published in the journal, an author in the process of publishing in the journal, and any others who are in a position to provide useful perspectives. Also to be considered are comments received from SAA members or any other information that the Council deems appropriate.  The Editor also completes a self-evaluation.

The Executive Director compiles all feedback received and disseminates this information to the Editor and the Council. The Council reviews the feedback regarding the Editor's performance and takes appropriate action. If feasible, the Council conducts a conference call with the Editor; otherwise, the Council conveys conclusions to the Executive Director to share directly with the Editor.

In years in which the incumbent Editor is eligible for reappointment, the Executive Director contacts the incumbent Editor to determine if he or she is interested in serving a second term. If the Editor expresses such an interest, the matter is referred to the Council for evaluation. The Council makes a recommendation regarding reappointment of the Editor or directs the Executive Director to implement a search for a new Editor as outlined in VII. Editor Search Process.

VII. Editor Search Process

In years in which the incumbent Editor is ineligible for reappointment, is not offered reappointment, or chooses not to serve a second term, the Council and staff work together to conduct a search for a new Editor.

A. Qualifications of Editor

The Editor of The American Archivist possesses the following qualifications:

  • Leadership skills that allow him or her to present a vision of the journal that places it at the center of the profession's intellectual dialog.
  • Ability to develop and nurture relationships with authors, both established and newly emerging, to encourage them to explore interesting questions and submit material to the journal.
  • Ability to nurture interesting but not completely satisfactory submissions to successful publication.
  • Ability and willingness to pay special attention to the need to develop ideas in newly emerging areas of the profession, to support the thoughtful re-examination of past professional insights, and to address issues of particular relevance to historically under-represented populations.
  • Excellent personal communication and writing skills, including the ability to edit scholarly material, the ability to communicate successfully with those who make submissions, and the ability to report to those in the Society with oversight responsibility for the journal.
  • Sufficient financial skill to manage the journal within the established budget.
  • Sufficient time-management skills to complete tasks in an acceptable manner and to publish the journal at appropriate and regular intervals as established within the annual budget work plan.

B. Search Committee

In January of the year prior to the expiration of the incumbent Editor's term of office, the Executive Director:

  • Forms a search committee consisting of the President (who serves as chair of the committee), the Council liaison to the Editorial Board, the chair of the Publications Board, a member of the Editorial Board selected by the President, the Executive Director, and the Director of Publishing.
  • Consults with the search committee regarding appropriate text for a call for applicants. The deadline for initial applications is no later than May 15.
  • Prepares advertising for the position in all available and appropriate SAA communication outlets.
  • Consults with the search committee to identify other venues for promoting the position and/or identifying prospective candidates who might be encouraged to apply for the position.

The search committee reviews the applications, interviews candidates, and makes a recommendation to the Council on the selection of an Editor. (Should the search committee believe that there are no qualified candidates, or that additional qualified candidates are desirable, the committee is empowered to solicit additional nominations to supplement those already received.)

The Council, with due consideration of the selection committee's recommendation, makes the final decision.

C. Suggested Timeline:

  • January–May: Advertising of position.
  • May 15: Application deadline.
  • May 22–June 15: Search committee receives applications and begins review process to identify candidates who proceed to the next stage.
  • June 15–July 30: Search committee conducts phone interviews and/or in-person interviews with candidates, deliberates, and prepares report to the Council recommending a new Editor.
  • August: Search committee delivers its recommendation to the Council. The Council deliberates and either appoints the candidate recommended by the search committee or agrees on a process and timeline for further solicitation and review of candidates. Search committee chair notifies all candidates regarding decision.
  • September/October: Executive Director executes contract with Editor.
  • November/December: SAA office facilitates transition between incoming Editor and outgoing Editor.
  • January 1: New Editor officially assumes duties.

Approved by the Council: February 5, 2005.
Revised: May 2014.

Appointments Committee

I. Purpose

The Appointments Committee assists the vice-president/president-elect with the appointment process by identifying a pool of potential candidates for appointed positions to committees, boards,  and tasks forces, and to official SAA representative positions. The Committee uses the volunteer self-nomination form, for those members who wish to be considered for appointments, and consults with current appointed group chairs for possible candidates. The Committee surveys the overall list of current and potential appointments to achieve quality, balance, and diversity of appointees both overall and within each unit. At the same time, the committee maintains an openness to appointing new people, especially through the intern program.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The committee consists of three to six members (including the chair) appointed by the newly elected SAA vice president prior to the Annual Meeting at which s/he takes office. The committee chair and members serve for one year to assist in the appointment process. Membership should reflect the diverse groups represented within SAA.

III. Reporting Procedures

After consulting the list of volunteers and leaders' recommendations, theCommittee prepares a list of possible candidates for each committee, task force, board, or representative position to assist the vice president in selecting nominees for these posts. The Vice President is responsible for contacting nominees to confirm acceptance of the appointment.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

The Appointments Committee is responsible for the following:

  • Encouraging self-nominations by members and attendees at the Annual Meeting to give members a chance to express interest in serving on a committee, task force, or board or as a representative.
  • Preparing announcements for Archival Outlook and other SAA media to encourage SAA members to submit their names for consideration for appointed groups on which they are interested in serving.
  • When necessary, reviewing recommendations from current chairs, representatives, councillors, officers, and sections in conjunction with self-nominations.
  • Preparing recommendations for appointments to be forwarded to the vice president.
  • The Appointments Committee chair will remain available to serve in an advisory role to the President to assist with filling vacancies or appointing new groups that arise during the President's term.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: June 1998. Revised: November 2016.

Awards Committee

I. Purpose

The Awards Committee has five major purposes:

  • To publicize awards offered by the Society of American Archivists to ensure outstanding entries.
  • To actively seek and solicit nominations for awards offered by the Society of American Archivists.
  • To evaluate the nominees for each award and to select winners in each category.
  • To plan and carry out the awards ceremony held during the Society of American Archivists Annual Meeting.
  • To review suggestions for new awards, develop criteria and guidelines, and make recommendations to the SAA Council.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The Awards Committee is composed of two committee co-chairs and the chairs of each of the awards subcommittees.

Annually the vice president/president-elect appoints one Awards Committee co-chair, who serves for one year as junior co-chair and one year as senior co-chair. 

The selection, size, and length of term of each subcommittee is determined by the Council upon adoption of a new award and may be modified by the Council.  Generally subcommittees comprise three members, each of whom serves for three years and as subcommittee chair in her/his third year.  To ensure that appropriate expertise is represented on certain awards subcommittees, however, the Council has determined the following exceptions:

  • Coker Award:  The Description Section chair serves for one year as a fourth member.
  • Diversity Award: The Diversity Committee chair serves as a fourth member.
  • Forman Scholarship: One member of the General Commission on Archives and History of The United Methodist Church (co-sponsor of the award) serves as the fourth member.
  • Ham Scholarship: All three subcommittee members must be SAA Fellows.
  • Jameson Award:  The Reference, Access, and Outreach Section chair serves for one year as a fourth member.
  • Lane Award:  The vice president of the Society of Southwest Archivists (co-sponsor of the award) serves for one year as a fourth member.
  • Mosaic Scholarship: The subcommittee consists of six SAA members, two of whom are appointed by the Vice President each year to serve three-year terms. One appointee shall be a previous Mosaic Scholarship recipient, and the chair is appointed annually by the Vice President from among the third-year subcommittee members. The Vice President’s appointments are made in consultation with the chairs of SAA’s Diversity Committee, the Archivists and Archives of Color Roundtable, and the Archival Educators Roundtable.
  • Pease Award:  The subcommittee consists of three members:  The American Archivist editor (chair), the Committee on Education vice chair, and one new appointee each year.
  • Pinkett Award: The subcommittee consists of three members:  the Archives and Archivists of Color Roundtable (AACRT) senior co-chair, one member of the AACRT (typically the junior co-chair) selected by the Roundtable senior co-chair, and one new appointee each year.
  • Posner Award:  All three subcommittee members must be SAA Fellows. 
  • Preservation Award:  The Preservation Section chair serves for one year as a fourth member.

III. Reporting Procedures

Awards are announced during the SAA Annual Meeting, and on the SAA website and in the newsletter following the Annual Meeting. The co-chairs represent the Committee when meeting with other SAA committees and with the SAA Council and staff.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

The Awards Committee publicizes SAA awards through announcements in the SAA newsletter and in other publications as appropriate. It also may publicize the awards during SAA Annual Meetings or conduct other activities to make archivists more aware of SAA awards. The Committee also solicits nominations for SAA awards by contacting individuals, archives organizations, and other groups that may be aware of worthy nominees.

The Committee establishes a deadline for awards nominations to be sent to the committee chair. The Awards co-chairs distribute nominations to the appropriate subcommittee. Each subcommittee evaluates nominations it receives on the basis of written criteria and selects award winner(s) as appropriate. Policy questions regarding criteria or eligibility for an award may be directed to the Awards co-chairs, the SAA Executive Director, or the Council for clarification.

The Awards co-chairs, in conjunction with the Awards Committee and the SAA Executive Director, plan an appropriate awards ceremony for the SAA Annual Meeting. Typically the ceremony is led by the Awards Committee senior co-chair, with each subcommittee chair presenting the award for which he/she is responsible. In addition to presenting the award, the subcommittee chair prepares an awards citation that may be read at the ceremony.

From time to time, the Committee reviews awards criteria and procedures and recommends any revisions that may be appropriate. The Committee may recommend new awards for the Council's consideration. The Committee also evaluates awards and changes to guidelines proposed by members of the Society and makes recommendations to the Council concerning the proposals. Should new awards be approved, the Awards Committee is responsible for drafting appropriate award criteria and procedures.

V. Meetings

The Committee meets at the Society's Annual Meeting.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: June 1988
Revised: January 1993,
January 2007, August 2011

 

See also

Description of Awards
Nomination Form

Committee on Education

I. Purpose

The Committee on Education has four complementary purposes: 1) to assess the profession's educational needs; 2) to prepare and promote standards for archival education programs based in graduate schools; 3) to prepare and promote post-appointment and continuing education and training programs; and 4) to provide advice to the SAA Education Office.

The Committee on Education's work is based on the following assumptions:

  • Education and professional development are essential to the continued advancement of the profession;
  • As the profession continues to grow and change, continuing education programs must be addressed in a coordinated manner, ensuring that developments in all areas are based on a common understanding of the profession at all levels;
  • Education and professional development offerings must be responsive to the forces and circumstances that could or should shape the profession; and
  • Education and professional development should be a cooperative enterprise involving various participants, including SAA; other national, regional, and local archival organizations; graduate-level academic programs; employers; and related professional associations.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The Committee on Education consists of ten members (including a chair and vice chair) appointed by the SAA Vice President for staggered three-year terms. The vice chair is appointed by the Vice President normally from among the committee members serving the second year of their appointment. The vice chair assumes the chair in his or her third year on the committee. The chair of the Digital Archives Specialist Subcommittee and the SAA Education Director serve as an ex officio members of the committee.

The membership of the committee shall include a mix of archival educators and practicing archivists with expertise in on eor more of the ACE categories and in continuing education development.

The vice chair of the Committee on Education serves as an ex officio member of the Theodore Calvin Pease Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee and as an informal advisor to the Students and New Archives Professionals Section.

III. Reporting Procedures

The committee reports to the Council, providing a formal written report in the spring of each year and reporting on special initiatives as necessary or requested.

The committee works closely with the Education Director, serving in an advisory capacity in education-related projects and programs operated out of the executive office.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

The Committee on Education's charge is to review the needs for continuing education, assist the SAA Education Office in developing relevant programming, and provide guidance to the Society in this area. The tasks and responsibilities of the Committee include:

  • Advise the SAA Education Director in:
    • Establishing directions and priorities for the Society's continuing education program; 
    • Monitoring the effectiveness of the offerings in light of professional needs and developments; 
    • Ensuring that the education programs are of high quality; 
    • Coordinating the work of the Education Office with other educational initiatives within SAA;
    • Compiling a list of educational opportunities.
  • Review educational initiatives proposed and/or undertaken by other SAA committees and sections, as appropriate;
  • Review and assess information provided by the Education Office, the Digital Archives Special Subcommittee, and the Graduate Archival Education Subcommittee on the full range of the profession's educational needs and the degree to which they are being met by existing educational opportunities, and make recommendations or undertake initiatives as appropriate;
  • Advise the Council on conditions and developments that affect educational program needs;
  • Maintain contact with educational offices / committees in related professions and organizations to explore opportunities for cooperative and mutually beneficial efforts;
  • Revise and update Archival Continuing Education (ACE) Guidelines in accordance with policy, including publishing revisions for member comment and submission to the Standards Committee per the internal approval process.

V. Meetings

The committee meets at the SAA Annual Meeting. Additional mid-year meetings are scheduled depending on the availability of financial resources.

Approved by the SAA Council: August 2008
Revised: January 1992, January 1998, May 2005, August 2008, May 2011, November 2016.

Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Subcommittee

I. Purpose

The Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Subcommittee is responsible for ensuring that the Digital Archives Specialist curriculum remains up-to-date.  Because the curriculum is likely to require frequent changes, the Subcommittee suggests and implements changes to the curriculum (including the examinations) as needed.  In addition, the Subcommittee is responsible for ensuring the currency of the core competencies for a DAS certificate, overseeing the learning outcomes to ensure that they support the core competencies, and supporting the development of new courses.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Subcommittee consists of eight members (including a chair) appointed by the SAA Vice President for staggered four-year terms. The subcommittee chair serves as an ex officio member of the Committee on Education. The SAA Education Director serves as an ex officio member of the subcommittee.

The membership of the subcommittee shall comprise a mix of practicing archivists with e-records/digital experience and or knowledge, teaching experience, technical skills, expertise covering the archival spectrum, and administrative or supervisory experience. Ideally, the subcommittee as a whole will reflect individual and institutional diversity. It is preferred that subcommittee members have a DAS certificate.

Members can expect to spend four to five hours per month on subcommittee work.

III. Reporting Procedures

The subcommittee reports to the Committee on Education, providing updates at each meeting and intermittently as appropriate. 

The subcommittee works closely with the Education Director, serving in an advisory capacity on education-related projects and programs operated out of the executive office.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

  • Assess and recommend changes to the DAS curriculum as needed.
  • Ensure the currency and relevance of the core competencies for a DAS certificate.
  • Oversee course learning outcomes to ensure that they support the core competencies.
  • Identify new topics for development.
  • Liaise with developers/instructors to ensure high-quality offerings.
  • Author the Comprehensive Examination and assure its integrity.

V. Meetings

When resources are available, the subcommittee meets up to two times each year and via monthly conference calls.

Approved by the SAA Council: May 2011
Revised: April 2012, January 2014, June 2016, February 2017

Graduate Archival Education (GAE) Subcommittee

I. Purpose

The Graduate Archival Education Subcommittee of the Committee on Education is charged with reviewing needs for graduate archival education, drafting and promulgating guidelines, and providing guidance to the Society in this area. The Subcommittee establishes its own agenda in conjunction with the Committee on Education, except as otherwise directed by the Council to perform specific tasks. Due to resource limitations, SAA and the GAE do not address accreditation issues.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The subcommittee consists of six members (including a chair and vice chair) appointed by the SAA Vice President for staggered three-year terms. The vice chair is appointed by the SAA Vice President normally from among the subcommittee members serving in the second year of appointment. The vice chair assumes the chair in her or his third year on the subcommittee.

The membership of the subcommittee shall include five archival educators and a student or new professional, all selected with an eye to including expertise, perspective, and community input from around the profession. The chair may bring on ad hoc volunteers for expertise as required. The chair serves as a member of the Committee on Education and as a liaison to the Archival Educators Section.

III. Reporting Procedures

The subcommittee reports to the Committee on Education. The subcommittee chair or designee provides updates during Committee conference calls and attends the Committee’s in-person meetings. 

The subcommittee works closely with the Education Director, serving in an advisory capacity on education-related projects and programs operated out of the Executive Office.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

The Graduate Archival Education Subcommittee is charged with reviewing needs for graduate archival education, drafting and promulgating guidelines, and providing guidance to the Society in this area. Duties and responsibilities include:

  • Regularly assess the Guidelines for a Graduate Program in Archival Studies (GPAS), publish appropriate revisions for member comment, and submit to the Standards Committee per the internal approval process;
  • Research existing programs in graduate archival education to create a comprehensive list;
  • Assist the Education Office with enhancing and maintaining the Directory of Archival Education based on the research;
  • Maintain contact with graduate archival education programs and other groups in related professions and organizations to explore opportunities for cooperative and mutually beneficial efforts;
  • Encourage communication about the role of continuing education in tandem with graduate programs, and communicate with SAA’s membership about the role of the Committee on Education in the world of graduate archival education;
  • Review and assess the full range of the profession's educational needs and the degree to which they are being met by existing educational opportunities, and make appropriate recommendations; and
  • Assist the Executive Office with issues relating to student chapters.

V. Meetings

The Graduate Archival Education Subcommittee meets via monthly conference calls and may conduct in-person meetings when a need is demonstrated and financial resources are available.

Approved by the SAA Council: November 2016.  

Committee on Ethics and Professional Conduct

I. Purpose

The Committee on Ethics and Professional Conduct addresses issues related to ethical and professional conduct within the archival profession. CEPC facilitates, as needed, the creation and promotion of education and outreach resources relating to the Code of Ethics for Archivists and the Core Values of Archivists statement and periodically reviews each document for currency.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The Committee on Ethics and Professional Conduct consists of six members appointed by the SAA vice president for staggered three-year terms. In consultation with the senior co-chair, the SAA vice president appoints a junior co-chair from among the rising second-year committee members each year for a two-year term, so that the terms of the two co-chairs are staggered.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

  1. The committee recommends to the Council updates to the Code of Ethics for Archivists and Core Values of Archivists when these are made necessary by changes in laws governing recordkeeping, copyright, or other pertinent subjects, or by changes in professional procedures and practices.
  2. The committee periodically conducts a complete review of the Code of Ethics for Archivists and Core Values of Archivists to ensure that ad hoc changes have not compromised its internal consistency and the document as a whole continues to meet the need of the profession. It recommends to the Council revisions as necessary.
  3. The committee monitors the rise of new ethical and professional conduct issues due to societal, legal, or judicial and technological developments.
  4. The committee solicits or creates case studies and other educational materials in a variety of formats to promote understanding and utilization of the Code of Ethics for Archivists and Core Values of Archivists, and works with SAA staff members to make these available in appropriate ways.
  5. The committee reviews its charge every two years and works with its Council liaison to propose any necessary changes for approval by the Council.

IV. Reporting Procedures

CEPC reports to the Council and works closely with its Council liaison, the President, and the Executive Director to ensure that it is responsive to the Council’s needs. The co-chairs are responsible for submitting an annual report to the Council, and may also submit items for Council action or discussion and feedback as necessary. The co-chairs also are  responsible for ensuring that minutes of CEPC meetings are prepared and posted on the CEPC’s SAA-hosted website to inform SAA members of its activities and comply with SAA’s record-keeping requirements.

Last Revised: June 2009; May 2014

Committee on Public Awareness

I. Purpose

The Committee provides strategic information and advice to the SAA Council to enhance SAA’s capacity to promote the value of archives and archivists to institutions, communities, and society.  The Committee recommends to the SAA Council the public awareness priorities on which SAA should focus its attention and resources, within the context of the Society’s mission and strategic plan.  In addition, the Committee works with staff and outside counsel to develop programs that promote the value and role(s) of archivists and archives nationwide.

The Committee on Public Awareness (COPA) is distinguished from the Committee on Advocacy and Public Policy (CAPP) by virtue of the audiences with which each group generally interacts and whose opinions it seeks to influence. CAPP generally is concerned with influencing legislative and regulatory (i.e., public policy) decisions of government at all levels; COPA generally is concerned with influencing opinions about the value of archivists and archives among the general public and stakeholder groups other than legislators and regulators (e.g., archives users, institutional resource allocators, etc.).  The two committees may collaborate on identification of key audiences, messages, and mediums to ensure a coordinated approach to SAA’s priorities and communications.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term:

The Committee consists of eight members (including a chair and vice chair) who are appointed by the SAA Vice President for staggered three-year terms.  The individual who is selected by the Vice President as vice chair, typically from among the incoming third-year members, becomes vice chair in the fourth year of service and accedes to chair in the fifth year. Individuals may be reappointed to the Committee.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

The Committee has the following duties and responsibilities:

A.  Acting proactively, the Committee: 

  • Works closely with SAA staff and, when available and appropriate, outside public relations counsel to develop work plans for enhancing public awareness of archivists and archives.
  • Prepares drafts, for Executive Committee or Council approval, of key public awareness messages, seeking input from members, component groups, and experts as appropriate.
  • Oversees development and distribution of low-cost, low-barrier tools and training for archivists to use in creating public awareness initiatives in their own local environments.
  • Seeks member, public, and media feedback to continuously increase the effectiveness of and involvement with public awareness activities, including but not limited to American Archives Month.
  • Determines and implements effective methods for tracking metrics associated with public awareness of and appreciation for archivists and archives.

B.  Acting in cooperation with other organizations and groups:

  • Brings to the Council's attention areas in which collaboration with internal groups and external organizations, including the Council of State Archivists, the National Association of Government Archives and Records Administrators, regional archival associations, and others may advance the Society's public awareness interests.
  • At the request of the Council or with its approval, cooperates with such organizations in pursuing public awareness efforts that further the interests of SAA and its members.

C.  Acting in response to requests or events, the Committee:

  • Responds in a timely fashion to requests from the President (acting on behalf of the Council) or the Executive Director for background information and recommendations on matters related to public awareness issues.
  • Develops and coordinates strategies for the Council and SAA to use in responding rapidly and appropriately to public awareness opportunities.
  • Collaborates with SAA component groups to ensure that the Committee and the Council are aware of and responsive to the public awareness issues that are of concern to members. 

IV. Reporting

The Committee works closely with the President, its Council Liaison, and the Executive Director to ensure that it is responsive to the Council's needs and is working in coordination with the staff office. In certain cases, when time is of the essence, Committee communications with the President and Executive Director may be discussed and acted upon solely by the Executive Committee.

Adopted by the SAA Council:  March 17, 2014.

Committee on Public Policy

I. Purpose

The Committee’s purpose is to provide strategic information and advice to the SAA Council to enhance SAA’s capacity to address public policy issues and concerns affecting archivists, archives, the archival profession, and its stakeholders.  The Committee recommends to the SAA Council the public policy priorities on which SAA should focus its attention and resources, within the context of the Society’s mission and strategic plan.  Although the Committee's purview is broad, its overarching priorities are issues related to the preservation of and access to records of enduring value that affect archivists, archival institutions, and users of the archival record.

II. Size, Composition, Selection, and Length of Terms

The Committee consists of eight members. Six members are appointed by the SAA Vice President for staggered three-year terms; a vice chair and chair serve one-year terms.

The SAA Vice President appoints a vice chair from among the Committee members serving in their third year.  That individual serves a fourth year as vice chair and accedes to chair in the fifth year.  Individuals may be reappointed to the Committee.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

The Committee has the following duties and responsibilities:

A. Acting proactively, the Committee: 

  • Periodically reviews and suggests (for Council approval) revisions to SAA’s Advocacy Agenda.
  • Prepares drafts, for Executive Committee or Council approval, of position papers, statements, issue briefs, and other documents related to public policy issues, seeking input from members and experts (including component groups) as appropriate and feasible.
  • Tracks legislative, regulatory, and other public policy issues that are of concern to archivists so that the Council is prepared to address the issues in a knowledgeable manner.
  • Brings to the Council's attention areas in which collaboration with other organizations may advance the Society's public policy interests and, under Council direction or with its approval, cooperates with such organizations in furthering SAA's interests.

B. Acting in response to requests or events, the Committee:

  • Responds in a timely fashion to requests from the President (acting on behalf of the Council) or the Executive Director for background information and recommendations on matters related to public policy issues.
  • Develops and coordinates strategies for the Council and SAA to use in responding rapidly and appropriately to public policy issues or situations that require SAA comment and/or action.
  • Prepares position statements and issue briefs on high-priority topics for approval by the Council.
  • Collaborates with SAA component groups to ensure that the Committee and the Council are aware of and responsive to the advocacy and public policy issues that are of concern to members. 

IV. Reporting

The Committee works closely with the President, its Council Liaison, and the Executive Director to ensure that it is responsive to the Council's needs and is working in coordination with the staff office. In certain cases, when time is of the essence, Committee communications with the President and Executive Director may be discussed and acted upon solely by the Executive Committee.

Approved by the SAA Council: September 2013

Name change to Committee on Public Policy (COPP), approved by the SAA Council: May 2016

Committee on the Selection of SAA Fellows

I. Purpose

The Committee on the Selection of SAA Fellows selects Fellows of the Society in accordance with criteria and procedures established and approved by the Council and in accordance with the Society's Constitution and Bylaws. From time to time the committee also performs other tasks assigned by the Council.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The committee is composed of the five most recent past presidents of the Society and three Fellows who are elected by the Council at its winter meeting and who serve one-year terms. Past presidents, current members of the Council, and Society staff members are not eligible for election. The president who has served the longest on the committee serves as chair of the committee.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

The Committee on the Selection of SAA Fellows elects new Fellows from individuals nominated by members of the Society. Individual members, primary contacts of institutional members, student members, and associate members are eligible to nominate SAA Fellows. The committee establishes a deadline for receipt of nominations well in advance of the Annual Meeting and develops a standard form for use in nominations in consultation with the Executive Director. The committee also ensures that the deadline is publicized and that the form is readily available. Nominations must include complete biographical information, including academic degrees and honors, pertinent professional and technical training, professional publications, Society activities, and a narrative description of the professional contributions that merit designation as a Fellow.

The Constitution provides that no more than five percent (5%) of the total individual membership reported at the last annual business meeting of the Society shall be elected as Fellows; that at least seventy-five percent (75%) of the members of the Committee on the Selection of Fellows must approve each candidate for a nomination to be approved; and that no member of the Society shall be elected a Fellow who has not been a full member of the Society in good standing for at least seven (7) years immediately preceding election. In approving nominations, the Committee shall be guided by achievement in each of the following criteria:

  • Appropriate academic education and professional and technical training in any of the fields of the Society's interest;
  • Professional archives experience in any of the fields of the Society's objectives for a minimum of seven years, which shall include evidence of professional responsibility;
  • Contributions to the profession demonstrating initiative, resourcefulness, and commitment;
  • Writings, presentations, and/or educational services (such as workshops or webinars) of superior quality and usefulness contributing to the realization of the Society's objectives;
  • Contributions to the archives profession through active participation in the Society of American Archivists and innovative or outstanding work on behalf of the Society.

While serving on this committee standing members may not formally endorse the candidacies of any of the nominations for consideration by the committee, nor participate actively in organizing the submission of an individual nomination. Similarly, when accepting appointment to the committee, Fellows selected to serve by Council should be required to accept as a condition of service that they will not formally endorse the candidacies of any of the nominations for consideration by the committee, nor participate actively in organizing the submission of an individual nomination.

A 75% favorable vote by members of the Committee on the Selection of SAA Fellows is required for election as a Fellow.

IV. Reporting Procedures

The committee chair informs the Executive Director of election results as soon as possible so that certificates may be prepared. The chair confidentially informs new Fellows of their election in advance of the Annual Meeting and publicly presents certificates to them at a ceremony at the Annual Meeting. The chair also ensures that nominators of other individuals are informed of the results of their nominations.

V. Meetings

The Committee consults by mail, telephone, and/or in person after nominations have been received so that each nominee's qualifications can be discussed and evaluated. The election of Fellows also may be held by telephone or in person, confirmed in writing, or by mail.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: February 1990
Revised: January 1992
, August 2008, February 2010

 

See also:

Distinguished Fellows
Fellow Nomination Form

Diversity Committee

I. Purpose

The Diversity Committee works to ensure that the organization's services, activities, policies, communications, and products support the goal of a more diverse SAA and professional archival community. It functions as a catalyst for new diversity-related initiatives, developed in coordination with various SAA entities, and monitors, evaluates, advocates for, and reports on matters pertaining to the diversity of archival practitioners and documentation.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The committee consists of nine members, including the chair and vice chair, who are appointed by the SAA vice president/president-elect. Committee members serve staggered three-year terms. In consultation with the chair, the SAA vice president appoints a vice chair from among committee members with at least one year of experience on the committee. The vice chair serves a one-year term, then accedes to a one-year term as committee chair.  

The chairs of the following member affinity groups with interests in diversity issues serve as ex officio members of the committee:

  • Archivists and Archives of Color Roundtable
  • Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives Roundtable
  • Lesbian and Gay Archives Roundtable
  • Membership Committee
  • Native American Archives Roundtable
  • Women Archivists Roundtable and Women's Collections Roundtable (This is a joint seat appointed in consultation with both roundtable chairs.)

III. Duties and Responsibilities

  • Guides members and staff to recognize the integral links of diversity to all SAA entities and concerns.
  • Develops diversity-related initiatives either on its own or in conjunction with other SAA units or the SAA office. Identifies prospective initiatives through reviews of the annual reports of SAA units and other means.
  • Regularly informs the membership of SAA’s progress regarding the organization’s efforts.
  • Monitors within and outside the organization issues that pertain to diversity concerns and advises the Council on how to address them.
  • Gathers, reviews, and analyzes feedback from the general membership, SAA leaders, and the Council.
  • Explores strategies with the SAA Membership Committee for recruiting and retaining individuals from underrepresented populations into the organization.
  • Cultivates relationships with allied professions to seek out opportunities for collaboration.

IV. Reporting Procedures

The Diversity  Committee reports to the Council and works closely with its Council liaison, the President, and the Executive Director to ensure that it is responsive to the Council’s needs. The chair is responsible for submitting an annual report to the Council, and may also submit items for Council action or discussion and feedback as necessary. The chair also is  responsible for ensuring that minutes of Diversity Committee meetings are prepared and posted on the Diversity Committee’s SAA-hosted website to inform SAA members of its activities and comply with SAA’s record-keeping requirements.

V. Meetings

The committee meets once per year at the Annual Meeting and may also meet mid-year when appropriate. In addition, the committee may conduct its business by e-mail or telephone during the course of the year.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: 2003
Revised: August 2006, February 2010, May 2014

Finance Committee

I. Purpose

The Finance Committee is responsible for assisting the Council in meeting its fiduciary responsibilities by: monitoring the financial health of the organization, ensuring that its assets are protected, and providing advice and counsel to the SAA Treasurer and the Council on financial matters, including the investment program.

II. Size, Composition, Selection, and Length of Terms

The Finance Committee consists of six members: the SAA Treasurer (who serves as chair), the Executive Director, the Finance/Administration Director, and three SAA members appointed by the Vice President in consultation with the current Finance Committee members to determine what expertise is needed as appointments are made. The three appointed members of the Committee serve for staggered three-year terms, so that one individual is appointed by the Vice President each year. The Vice President may appoint a seventh member (as needed or appropriate) an individual who is not an SAA member or archivist, but who has special expertise in one or more aspects of financial management.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Finance Committee reports to each full meeting of the Council, typically via the Treasurer's formal written report, and also reports to the Council on special initiatives as necessary or requested.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

Review the Society's financial policies and make recommendations to the Council as appropriate. Review and monitor the Society's income and expenditures, annually review SAA dues and dues revenue to assure SAA's long-term financial stability, and report to the Council on SAA's financial needs and stability. Ensure preparation of accurate, timely, and meaningful financial statements. Meet (via conference call) with the independent auditor annually and review the Annual Audit Report. Review bids, interview, and recommend to the Executive Committee the selection of the external auditor every three years. Review and monitor the Society's investments portfolio and report to the Council on the growth and stability of the investments. Recommend changes to the investment strategy and the Investment Policy as appropriate. Review bids, interview, and recommend to the Executive Committee the selection of one or more investment consultants every three years.

V. Meetings

The Committee meets via conference call 1) after receipt of each quarterly report, in order to discuss the Society's financial standing; 2) prior to submission of a draft annual budget for Council review and adoption, in order to ensure that the draft budget is responsible and reasonable; 3) annually with the external auditor, in order to receive and discuss the Annual Audit Report; and 4) as needed with the investment consultant(s), in order to monitor investment performance.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: August 2009
Revised: May 2010

Host Committee

I. Purpose

Working closely with the SAA Executive Director and staff, the Host Committee serves as an advisory group to, and onsite extension of, the conference staff.  Committee members provide their knowledge of the local area and its history and ideas for the non-program-related arrangements associated with the Annual Meeting. 

The conference staff works with Committee members’ suggestions, the SAA Council-adopted budget, and the input of the SAA President and other leaders and staff to explore options and make final decisions and arrangements. Committee members also contribute promotional information (including articles, photographs, and online-only information about the host city) and serve on site as registration personnel.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The SAA Vice President / President-Elect appoints the chair and members of the Host Committee for the meeting over which he/she presides as president. The chair recommends members of the Host Committee from the geographic area in which the Annual Meeting is being held. The chair may wish to designate one or more co- or deputy chairs. The Host Committee is appointed one year or more before the Annual Meeting and serves through that meeting. Members of the Host Committee must be members of SAA, although non-SAA members may be asked to advise or assist the committee.

Host Committees generally establish subcommittees to facilitate their work. The number and responsibilities of these subcommittees is left up to the needs and wishes of each Host Committee.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Host Committee chair submits a report to the SAA Council (at the Annual Meeting or soon thereafter for online consideration) that addresses the extent to which Host Committee activities addressed diversity issues, evaluates the success of the Host Committee work process over the course of the year, and outlines issues encountered or to be addressed by future Host Committees. The Host Committee chair or co-chairs should be available to advise the incoming chair/co-chairs of the next year’s Committee to ensure transfer of knowledge.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

The Executive Director and conference staff are responsible for:

  • Final selection of images, reception venues, and vendors. Final selection of the plenary speakers rests with the President and Executive Director.
  • All final logistics arrangements, including negotiations and contracts.

The Host Committee’s primary duties are the following:

A. Identify, research, and recommend:

  • Repositories that will hold tours and/or open houses before and/or during the meeting.
  • Professional tours (and tour companies).  SAA does not provide any services related to professional tours, but may promote the availability of such tours if they do not conflict with the conference schedule.
  • Local vendors that may be good prospects for the Exhibit Hall.
  • Local prospects for meeting sponsors.
  • Speakers for plenary session(s) (although the final decisions are made by the SAA President).
  • All-Attendee Reception site. Closing Party site (if a Closing Party is held).

B. Help promote the meeting and supply articles, images, and other written materials.
The Host Committee works closely with the SAA Executive Director and staff throughout the year prior to and during the Annual Meeting.  Activities led by the Host Committee include but are not limited to:

  • Make a brief presentation during the previous year's Annual Meeting and alert local archivists and others about the Annual Meeting.
  • Prepare articles for several issues of SAA’s Archival Outlook to build excitement about attending a meeting in the host city and spotlight historical facts and notable local collections. Writing should be energetic, enthusiastic, and interesting; humor is appropriate. Generally these articles include photos and caption information.
  • Prepare promotional and welcome information for the Preliminary, Online, and Onsite programs. Provide images (including caption information and usage rights) showing scenes of the host city that may be posted on the SAA website or used in SAA publications for promotional purposes. Images ideally should reflect the diversity of people, collections, repositories, and institutions in the geographic area.

C. Collect, compile, and use available communication mechanisms (social media, conference website, materials in the registration area) to present local information to potential Annual Meeting registrants.  The Host Committee should develop and post actively on an Annual Meeting blog, which should include links to Annual Meeting information tracked and publicized by staff on the SAA website (such as repository tours and session information), as well as the following local information:

  • Travel information that will help attendees get around town as easily as possible (e.g., public transportation system maps and schedules, shuttle and taxi information, city maps). Submit to staff and consider linking to this material from the blog. 
  • Dining guide.  The Host Committee may choose to compile a guide or simply to provide links to online local guides. Submit to staff and consider linking to this material from the blog.
  • Lists of other information that may be of particular interest to attendees, such as local tours, bookstores, coffee houses, fun and unusual shopping destinations, nearby restaurants (with price ranges), services such as drug stores and photocopy facilities, cultural events, recreational activities, and tourist attractions. Information may be gathered from existing resources (such as the convention bureau) or the Host Committee may develop its own directory of information. Submit to staff and consider linking to this material from the blog.
  • A list of repositories (e.g., archives, libraries, museums) in the area that are willing to hold tours or to open their repositories to Annual Meeting attendees. Details such as the name, address, hours, and directions to the repository should be submitted to the SAA Executive Director and staff for publication on the Annual Meeting website or via other appropriate SAA media outlets.

D.  Coordinate and supply volunteers (both Host Committee members and other volunteers) for staffing of the “Advance Registration” desk during conference hours.

  • Includes checking in pre-paid registrants, handing out name badges and programs, and answering questions about the local area.  

SAA is not able to waive registration fees for Host Committee members or other volunteers.

V. Meetings

The Host Committee meets as many times as is necessary before the Annual Meeting. SAA staff members attend some of these meetings. Meetings may be conducted in the host city, via conference call, or via alternative remote meeting technologies.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: September 1988
Revised: June 1992, December 2012

Membership Committee

I. Purpose

The Membership Committee cooperates with the SAA Executive Director, staff, and the Council to provide advice and counsel on matters of membership recruitment and retention.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

The Membership Committee shall be composed of a chair, a vice chair/chair-elect, and six additional members to serve in staggered three-year terms. The chair of the Diversity Committee serves as an ex officio member. Standing subcommittees shall be appointed by the chair as needed and shall be chaired by a committee member.

The composition of the committee shall represent as broadly as possible all constituencies within the Society. The committee chair submits recommendations of prospective committee members to SAA's vice president/president-elect for consideration, as well as the name of a third-year committee member to serve as its next vice chair. The vice chair will serve a one-year term, followed by a one-year term as chair.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Membership Committee chair and vice chair must submit an annual report to the Council by December 31. The committee works closely with the SAA Executive Director and staff throughout the year as needed.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

The Membership Committee is responsible for the following:

  • Membership Service. Identifying the needs of members and recommending the development of services to meet those needs.
  • Increasing Membership. Recommending means for increasing SAA's membership base, especially among underrepresented groups including, but not limited to, African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian/Pacific-Americans.
  • Keeping Membership Informed. Recommending to the SAA Executive Director, the Council, and other SAA committees and related associations ways to make prospective and current members aware of the resources, services, and membership benefits of SAA.
  • Welcoming New Members. Recommending ways to acknowledge new members and to encourage participation in SAA activities.
  • Identifying Nonmember Needs and Perceptions. Gathering information on and analyzing non-members’ needs and perceptions of SAA. Recommending ways to meet these needs to attract non-members to join SAA.

V. Meetings

The Membership Committee meets at least once during the Annual Meeting and at other times, if necessary.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: January 1988
Revised: June 1992, June 1997, September 2004
; December 2009

See also:
Membership Committee website
 

Mosaic Program Advisory Group (Affiliated Group)

I. Purpose

The Mosaic Program Advisory Group provides ongoing support for the Association of Research Libraries/Society of American Archivists Mosaic Program, which provides financial support, practical work experience, mentoring, career placement assistance, and leadership development to individuals who are from traditionally underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups. The Mosaic Program work is funded by a three-year, $487,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

II. Task Force Selection, Size, and Length of Term

Following an open call for participation, the SAA Vice President/President-Elect will appoint five SAA members of varying levels of experience within the profession. One of those individuals will serve as the chair of the Advisory Group.  Another of those individuals will serve as the chair of the Mosaic Program Selection Committee.  All appointments are effective from July 1, 2013, to May 31, 2016

III. Reporting Procedures

The Advisory Group will submit periodic reports to the Project Director on a schedule that ensures that all IMLS grant reporting requirements are fulfilled.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

Advisory Group members will contribute their time and perform all functions as extra-professional activities.

The Advisory Group will:

  • Establish the selection criteria for Mosaic Scholars, within the parameters outlined in the grant application.

  • Provide input on drafts of calls for applicants, marketing materials, and mentor training materials (e.g., webinars).

  • Work with the site coordinator from each partner institution to recruit on-site internship supervisors.

  • Work with the site coordinator from each partner institution to recruit on-site mentors.

  • In consultation with the SAA Executive Director, the SAA Program Coordinator, and the Project Director, develop the curriculum for the annual Mosaic Program Leadership Symposium to be held in conjunction with the SAA Annual Meeting.

  • Work with the Project Director and assigned staff to establish a “career placement service” that will, with the cooperation of mentors, develop programs and services to facilitate effective transitions into the professional workforce for all program participants.

  • Work with the Project Director and Program Coordinator to develop and monitor outcomes-based assessment of the program.

V. Meetings

The Advisory Group will accomplish its work primarily via email, conference call, and/or other electronic means and may meet in conjunction with the SAA Annual Meeting (although funding is not provided for a face-to-face meeting).

Mosaic Program Selection Committee (Affiliated Group)

I. Purpose

The Mosaic Program Selection Committee is responsible for reviewing applications and selecting each cohort of Mosaic Scholars (five individuals in each of three years).

II. Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The Selection Committee comprises five individuals. Following an open call for participation, the SAA Vice President/President-Elect will appoint to the Committee three SAA members of varying levels of experience within the profession. The Association of Research Libraries will appoint two individuals to the Committee. The chair of the Selection Committee will also serve as a member of the Mosaic Program Advisory Group. All appointments are effective from July 1, 2013, through May 31, 2016.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Selection Committee will submit periodic reports to the Mosaic Program Advisory Group and Project Director on a schedule that ensures that applicants receive prompt notification and all grant reporting requirements are fulfilled.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

Selection Committee members will contribute their time and perform all functions as extra-professional activities.

The Selection Committee will:

  • Review the applications received in response to the call for applicants issued for each cohort (2013, 2014, and 2015) based on selection criteria established by the Mosaic Program Advisory Group within the parameters outlined in the grant application.

  • Provide timely reports of its decisions to ensure that all applicants receive prompt notification.

V. Meetings

The Selection Committee will accomplish its work via email, conference call, and/or other electronic means.

Nominating Committee

I. Purpose

In accordance with the SAA Bylaws, the Nominating Committee selects a slate of candidates to present for membership vote; provides information about the slate of candidates for the SAA Newsletter; drafts questions for inclusion in the candidates' statements; prepares a final report; and reports the election results at the annual business meeting.

II. Committee Selection, Size, Length of Terms

The Nominating Committee is composed of five members who serve for one year. Three members are elected each year by the membership from a slate submitted by the outgoing Nominating Committee and from any petition and write-in candidates submitted by the membership. Two of the three second-year Council members are selected by lot at the spring meeting of the Council to complete this committee. The vice president/president-elect appoints the chair of the Nominating Committee in the event of a tie for that office, according to the procedures in Bylaw 5.A.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

The committee selects a slate of two candidates for each of the following offices: vice president/president-elect, three members of Council, and three Nominating Committee members. Two candidates for the office of Treasurer are chosen every third year.

Prior to the Annual Meeting, the chair obtains information from the SAA office and/or the SAA Archives regarding the preferential ballot, previous candidate slates, and election results. The Chair sends this information, along with copies of the Nominating Committee Guidelines and Information Sheets for Nominees to the other committee members. She/he also schedules committee meetings at the Annual Meeting, develops meeting agendas, and assigns responsibilities to committee members (e.g., to prepare lists of possible candidates or to contact various groups for suggestions).

The committee normally meets twice during the Annual Meeting. The first meeting, scheduled early in the week, should result in a slate of candidates for each office, a list of alternates, and a draft of the questions for the candidates' statements. (Because so much of the committee's work is completed during the Annual Meeting, if a Nominating Committee Open House is held, it should be scheduled early, perhaps prior to the first committee meeting, so that it can serve as an effective means for securing additional nominations.) The period between the two meetings of the committee is used by committee members to contact prospective candidates, inform them of the duties/ obligations of running for office, provide them with copies of the Information Sheet for Nominees, and secure commitments from as many of them as possible. The second meeting includes preparation of the final slate, the development of plans for contacting any candidates not yet committed, and approval of questions for candidates. A list of suggestions for nominations to be forwarded to the next year's committee also may be prepared at this meeting.

If alternate candidates must be approached after the Annual Meeting, the committee may reconvene by conference call. The final slate is circulated among the committee members for review, and the chair formally writes all candidates to confirm nomination prior to submitting the slate and list of candidates' questions to the Executive Director. The final slate is to be published in the SAA Newsletter. The SAA office handles the preparation and distribution of the ballot and arranges for the tabulation of election results by the Ballot Committee. The Executive Director informs each of the candidates of the results of the election.

The chair of the committee prepares a final report and submits it to the Council.

The chair reports the election results at the following annual business meeting.

IV. Criteria for Selection of Candidates

All candidates must be Individual members of SAA. Although no other formal criteria are listed for candidates, most committees strive for a balanced slate in terms of gender, geographical area, types and size of candidates repositories, and professional interests. The committee may wish to use past service on the Council as a requirement for selection of vice presidential candidates, and active participation in SAA as a requirement for candidates for the Council.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: June 1988

Program Committee

I. Purpose

The Program Committee selects, oversees, and reports on the education sessions for the Annual Meeting for which it is established. It maintains liaison with the SAA President, appropriate SAA staff, and the Host Committee.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

  1. The chair is chosen by the Vice President/President-Elect for the Annual Meeting for which she/he will preside as president. The Vice President/President-Elect may choose to appoint co-chairs.
  2. The chair of the Program Committee serves for one annual program.
  3. The chair is chosen at least one year in advance of the program for which she/he is chair. The selection is announced via SAA's communication channels.
  4. The chair may recommend to the Vice President/President-Elect other members of the Program Committee, taking into consideration those individuals who have volunteered for the Committee in response to the Call for Volunteers. The Committee should be composed of ten to twelve members, excluding ex officio members. The selection should reflect a concern for balanced representation of the membership. Important factors include gender, race/ethnicity, geographic area, type of repository, and areas of membership activity. It is customary (but not required) for the Committee to include a member from the city in which the Annual Meeting will be held.
  5. The chair of the Program Committee for the following year serves as an ex officio member of the current Program Committee to ensure continuity and experience. The SAA President, Executive Director, and appropriate staff liaisons also are ex officio members of the Committee.
  6. Because of the large amount of work that the Committee must accomplish within a short time, the chairperson, with the consent of the President, has the prerogative of removing (and replacing, as necessary) inactive members of the Committee.

III. Reporting Procedures

  1. The chair prepares articles for Archival Outlook (and other appropriate communication channels) as needed to describe the Program Committee's activities and the program itself. He or she also prepares an introduction for the published program.
  2. The chair submits two required reports to the SAA Council: 1) an interim report (at the Council's winter meeting) that provides an update on the status of the program, responds to the "Principles and Priorities for Continuously Improving the SAA Annual Meeting" (adopted by the Council in August 2013), and addresses suggestions embedded in the 2013 Annual Meeting Task Force Final Report, and 2) a final report (at the Council's August meeting) that addresses (at minimum) the extent to which the Committee incorporated appropriately diverse programming into the Annual Meeting experience. The second report concludes the Program Committee's "official" cycle of work. The Council also welcomes a formal or informal report after the Annual Meeting that may offer perspectives on the meeting that has just taken place. While not required, suggestions to enhance the deliberation process and the Annual Meeting experience are welcome in all reports. (Note: As of 2015, the reports have been submitted in May preceding the Annual Meeting and in November following the Annual Meeting to ensure that they are complete.)

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

  1. The chair ensures that each member of the Committee promptly receives a copy of the program guidelines and timetable of deadlines. Specific deadlines vary based on Annual Meeting dates but generally follow the timetable below, which assumes an August meeting. Program Committee work begins approximately 14 months before the Annual Meeting. (Note: As of 2015, this schedule has been altered to accommodate a mid- to late November proposal deadline and a January Program Committee meeting. Should this experimental schedule prove to be more effective going forward, the committee's description will be revised to reflect it.)
    • July: The Call for Proposals typically is available at least one month before the previous year's Annual Meeting (e.g., by July 1, 2013, for the 2014 Annual Meeting). The Call remains open for approximately three months.
    • August: The first in-person meeting occurs at the previous year's Annual Meeting.
    • October: Once the Call closes, individual Program Committee members review and rank each proposal received in preparation for discussion at the second in-person meeting.
    • November: Program Committee members meet in person to decide which proposals will be accepted (outright or pending revision).
    • November - January: Program Committee members and staff communicate with session proposers about the status of their sessions and possible revisions.
    • February: To aid in publicizing the conference schedule at least four months before the conference takes place, work on session descriptions begins six months before the Annual Meeting.
    • April: Publicizing of conference schedule begins four months before the Annual Meeting.
    • August: The third in-person meeting occurs at the beginning of the Annual Meeting, and Program Committee members shepherd their assigned sessions at the Annual Meeting.
  2. In consultation with the President and Executive Director, the Program Committee reaches decisions early in its term about such issues as:
    • Is there to be a program theme?
    • How many sessions and session tracks should be scheduled?
    • Should certain topics be emphasized?
    • What types of new or innovative session formats should be tried?

    In reaching its decisions on these questions, the Program Committee will follow the Council-adopted "Principles and Priorities for Continuously Improving the SAA Annual Meeting" (August 2013) and the recommendations of the 2011-2013 Annual Meeting Task Force in its final report to the Council (May 2013).

  3. To ensure the broadest possible participation in the meeting, individuals serving on the Program Committee may not participate on education sessions for that conference, and no individual may be included on more than one session proposal.
  4. The Program Committee solicits suggestions for sessions from the membership and appropriate internal and external groups (e.g., SAA component groups and regional and affiliate organizations) using the following methods:
    • Circulate copies of session proposal forms as widely as possible, including distribution at the preceding Annual Meeting and via SAA's various communication channels.
    • Contact all SAA component groups to encourage them to submit proposals.
    • Prepare articles for Archival Outlook and other appropriate communication channels.
    • Reach out to contacts in regional and other affiliated organizations to encourage submissions.
  5. The Program Committee reviews and evaluates session proposals submitted for consideration and determines what program sessions will be offered. To conduct this review, the Committee meets in the fall prior to the Annual Meeting for which it is responsible. Travel expenses for the meeting are funded by SAA. (Note: Beginning with the 2015 Annual Meeting, the Call for Proposals deadline has occurred in mid- to late November and the Committee has met in January.)
    • Before the fall Committee meeting, members receive all proposals and evaluate them based on an agreed-upon methodology established by the chair. Evaluations are submitted to the chair before the meeting so they can be summarized and analyzed. An assessment of session coverage based on program themes and subject areas is compiled for use at the in-person meeting.
    • At the in-person Committee meeting, proposed sessions are further evaluated for inclusion on the program. Committee members may refine the content of proposed sessions or combine proposals.
    • The Program Committee may develop additional sessions to supplement those submitted for its consideration.
  6. Program Committee members should be mindful of providing even coverage of subject areas that address diverse levels of professional experience, as well as appropriate representation among speakers in accordance with SAA's Statement on Diversity and Inclusion. The Committee should make an effort to enable newer members of the Society to participate fully on the program, thus avoiding an undue reliance on past speakers. Inclusion of nonmembers and non-archivists on Annual Meeting sessions is one way in which the Program Committee can assist attendees in gaining a fresh perspective from both the archives profession and affiliated professions. The Committee should make every effort to embrace a diversity of perspectives while ensuring that selected proposals are relevant to current and emerging trends in the profession.
  7. The Program Committee will consider only proposals directed to it.
  8. The Program Committee engages members in the proposal process by inviting SAA sections, committees, and working groups to provide endorsements of Annual Meeting program proposals. Endorsements by these groups are one factor among many that the Program Committee considers during the process of developing a balanced, diverse program. An endorsement by a group is not a guarantee that a proposal will be accepted. The following procedures (adopted by the Council in August 2005 and revised in August 2013) apply when component groups provide endorsements. (Note: Since 2013, and on a trial basis, endorsements by component groups have been suspended.)
    1. Proposers must submit proposals directly to the Program Committee to be considered. If a session proposer wishes to seek endorsement from one or more SAA component groups (section, committee, working group), the proposer should send additional copies of the proposal to the group. The “official copy” of the proposal is held by the Program Committee. Proposals that were not sent directly to the Program Committee by the proposer will not be considered.
    2. Groups may not endorse more than two program proposals. Endorsements should be sent directly to the Program Committee. Deadlines for endorsements occur slightly later than those for the proposal process. They are published on the SAA website.
    3. Group leaders must send their endorsements of a maximum of two proposals to the Program Committee chair by the published deadline. The Program Committee will not accept group endorsements from session proposers; endorsements must be sent by a representative of the endorsing SAA group (usually the chair). This communication may be as simple as a list of endorsed session proposals or may be a more detailed statement of why the group thinks that the session is of particular value to the broader Annual Meeting audience (because of the topics, speakers, or some other factor).
    4. The Program Committee will give appropriate weight to single and multiple groups’ endorsements when selecting proposals that support the meeting’s theme or the broader goal of providing a diverse program that meets the needs of members. Endorsement(s) of a session do(es) not, however, guarantee that the Committee will accept a proposal.
  9. The Program Committee chair ensures that all proposals are acknowledged and, with the assistance of staff, prepares written letters of communication to notify session proposers regarding the disposition of their proposals and requiring them to notify all other individuals listed on the proposal of the decision of the Program Committee.
  10. Each Program Committee member is assigned a group of sessions for which he/she serves as liaison throughout the Annual Meeting planning cycle. The Program Committee liaison assists session speakers and staff in communicating about plans and new developments and in successfully executing the session at the Annual Meeting.
  11. Program Committee members will direct to the SAA Executive Director any requests from session participants for complimentary registration.
  12. The Program Committee provides participants with guidelines for session formats.
  13. The Program Committee chair works with SAA staff to troubleshoot, make decisions about, and communicate any changes in the status of sessions or speaker rosters for all published versions of the Annual Meeting schedule.
  14. The Program Committee maintains communication with the Host Committee via the Program Committee electronic discussion list, SAA staff liaisons, and other appropriate methods.
  15. The chair appoints a member of the Program Committee to serve as chair of the Student Program Subcommittee, usually from among volunteering Program Committee members.
  16. The President may solicit ideas from the Program Committee for plenary speaker(s). Selection of the plenary speaker(s) is the President's responsibility.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: September 1988
Revised: August 2005, August 2013

Student Program Subcommittee

I. Purpose

The Student Program Subcommittee reviews and selects graduate student paper proposals and oversees selection and/or judging of student posters for the annual meeting for which it is established. The Student Program Subcommittee is also charged with formulating applicable policy recommendations, as necessary, for the effective management of graduate student paper and poster sessions.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Terms

  1. The subcommittee shall consist of five members.
  2. The subcommittee chair shall be a member of the Program Committee and is appointed by the Program Committee chair/co-chairs;
  3. One member shall be a representative of the Committee on Education, appointed by the chair of the Committee on Education;
  4. One member shall be a representative of the Archival Educators Roundtable, appointed by the Archival Educators Roundtable chair/co-chairs;
  5. The Subcommittee's immediate past chair shall serve as a member to ensure continuity; and
  6. One student member, who may also serve (if possible) as the chair for the upcoming Graduate Student Paper Session, shall be selected by the Subcommittee's immediate past chair from the previous Annual Meeting’s Graduate Student Paper Session speakers.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Student Program Subcommittee reports to the Program Committee chair/co-chairs.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

  1. Once appointed, the chair solicits appointments from the chair of the Committe on Education and the chair/co-chairs of the Archival Educators Roundtable.
  2. The Subcommittee works with SAA staff to issue a call student paper proposals and student poster proposals.
  3. The Subcommittee reviews and selects proposals.

 

Approved by Council: January 2006
Revised: August 2008, January 2013

Publications Board

I. Purpose

The purpose of the Publications Board and Publications Editor is to ensure that the Society's non-serial publications serve the needs of its members. The Publications Board assists the Publications Editor by establishing overall policy direction, goals, and priorities for the non-serial publications program; approving manuscripts; and monitoring publications to ensure consistently high quality. The Publications Board also assists with the evaluation of the Publications Editor as requested by the Council.

II. Board Size, Length of Terms, and Selection

The Publications Board consists of the Publications Editor, who serves as chair of the board, and eight individual board members.

The Publications Editor's term of office, assuming satisfactory performance, is three years, with an option of reappointment for one additional three-year term.

The eight individual board members are appointed for four-year terms that are staggered so that one-fourth of the members are appointed each year. The Publications Editor recommends new members for appointment by the SAA Vice President. The Vice President bears ultimate responsibility for appointing board members to ensure that they represent diverse knowledge areas and constituencies within SAA. The Publications Editor's recommendations, however, bear considerable weight in this appointment process. An individual may serve no more than two consecutive terms.

The chair of The American Archivist Editorial Board will serve as an ex officio member of the Publications Board.

III. Duties and Responsibilities

A. Publications Editor

The role of the Publications Editor is to set a vision and provide philosophical and strategic direction for the program, acquire manuscripts, maintain a clear and transparent review process, direct the work of the Publications Board, cultivate partnerships with other professional associations, and seek external financial support (with the Council's permission) for specific projects.

The Publications Editor also serves as an ex officio member of The American Archivist Editorial Board.

B. Publications Board

The Publications Board assists the Publications Editor to:

  1. Develop and implement editorial policies and procedures.
  2. Review manuscripts, recommend reviewers, and coordinate review processes.
  3. Solicit authors and publish works that support the archival profession.
    • Ensure that seminal archival literature remains in publication.
    • Publish new, and newly translated, academic works on advanced archival topics.
    • Publish works that establish best practices. Produce revised editions as necessary.
    • Publish new works that meet the evolving needs of the membership.
  4. Identify titles published by other publishing outlets that should be acquired for distribution by SAA or promoted by SAA.
  5. Continue a fiscally responsible program of publishing and distributing works relating to archival history, practice, research, and principles.
    • Work to increase funds for an expanded publications program, such as cooperative ventures with other publishers, seeking grants to defray the cost of some publications, and suggesting ways in which the Council-designated Publications Fund might be enhanced.
    • Seek ways to improve marketing strategies for current and new audiences.
  6. Participate fully in all board discussions.

C. SAA Office

The SAA office coordinates the physical production and mechanical aspects of the publishing program, including:

  • Negotiate contracts with authors;
  • Negotiate contracts with vendors (e.g., printers);
  • Negotiate contracts with other publishing outlets to distribute works;
  • Oversee production of SAA publications;
  • Manage inventory of titles;
  • Ensure that all deadlines are met;
  • Provide reports to assist the Publications Board to accomplish its goals;
  • Coordinate communication with and among the Publications Board members, and with SAA members at large;
  • Ensure the production and distribution of Publications Board meeting minutes.

IV. Meetings

The Publications Board typically meets twice each year, once at the Annual Meeting and once at the midpoint of the fiscal year (provided funding is available). The Council liaison, Editor of The American Archivist, Executive Director, and Director of Publishing participate in all meetings of the Publications Board.

V. Budget

The SAA Council, as part of its budget process, approves the publications program budget, which is prepared by the SAA office.

VI. Reporting and Performance Evaluation Procedures for Editor

The Publications Editor reports directly to the Council, and is required to submit written reports three times a year to the Council. The Council also may request that the Publications Editor attend and present a verbal report in conjunction with the Annual Meeting.

If the Council expresses concern about the performance of the Publications Editor, it will charge the Executive Director to gather information so that the Council can conduct a more detailed performance review. Such a performance review would include feedback from Publications Board members, the Director of Publishing, authors, and other individuals as appropriate.

In years in which the incumbent Publications Editor is eligible for reappointment, the Executive Director will contact the incumbent Publications Editor to determine if he or she is interested in serving a second term. If the Publications Editor expresses such an interest, the matter will be referred to the Council. After reviewing the Publications Editor's performance based on the position description and consulting such individuals as it deems appropriate, the Council will determine whether it wishes to offer the Publications Editor reappointment to a second term or will direct the Executive Director to implement a search for a new Publications Editor.

 

Approved by the Council September 29, 2006.
Revised by the Council: June 2012.

Standards Committee

I. Purpose

The Standards Committee is responsible for initiating and facilitating the development of standards;* providing review and comment on standards that are relevant to archival theory and practice; educating the archives community about the value and role of standards; and partnering with related information management professional organizations on standards of mutual concern and interest.

* For the purposes of this document, the term "standards" includes standards, technical standards, conventions, rules, guidelines, and best practices. See Standards Development and Review for more information.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The Standards Committee consists of nine appointed members (including two co-chairs) appointed by the SAA vice president / president-elect for staggered three-year terms. The Committee also shall include ex officio members, including chairs of all technical subcommittees and development and review teams that report to the Standards Committee, representatives of other SAA groups whose interests and activities closely interact with those of the Standards Committee, and members who serve as SAA's representatives to external organizations that deal with matters within the Committee's area of concern. Ex officio members shall include:

The SAA vice president / president-elect annually appoints three members based on recommendations from the Standards Committee co-chairs, whose terms begin at the end of the Annual Meeting. The co-chairs are appointed for staggered two-year terms, and are normally appointed based on the recommendation of the co-chairs by the vice president / president-elect from among the current and previous members of the Committee. Following the co-chair's two-year appointment, the co-chair shall become an ex officio member for one year.

Technical subcommittees. The Standards Committee may recommend that the SAA Council form (and disband) technical subcommittees. The SAA Council may charge a technical subcommittees to oversee SAA-developed standards. Technical subcommittees are responsible for the maintenance and review of the assigned standard (which requires that they monitor all feedback and calls for revision of the standard) and for promoting the standard and educating appropriate communities about it. Technical subcommittee chairs serve as regular or ex officio members of the Standards Committee.

With the recommendations of the Standards Committee co-chairs, the SAA vice president / president-elect appoints technical subcommittee chairs and members. Technical subcommittee members must have expertise related to the standard that they are responsible for maintaining. Technical subcommittees are ongoing as long as the adoped standard remains in use. Technical subcommittee chairs serve as regular or ex officio members of the Standards Committee.

Development and review teams. The Standards Committee may recommend that the SAA Council form (and disband) development and review teams to research and develop a specific standard, review a specific standard, study the need for a standard, or address a particular topic. Development and review teams are ad hoc and will be charged for an appropriate period of time as determined by the Council in consultation with the Standards Committee, not to exceed three years, and with the possibility of renewal.

With the recommendations of the Standards Committee co-chairs, the SAA vice president / president-elect appoints development and review team chairs and members. Development and review team members must have expertise related to the topic being addressed, and will most often be from the group that proposed the original project. Development and review team chairs serve as regular or ex officio members of the Standards Committee.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Standards Committee reports to the Council, providing a formal written report annually and reporting on special initiatives as necessary or requested. The co-chairs are responsible for coordinating the formulation and evaluation of the annual report and other planning documents as needed in consultation with Standards Committee members. The chair of each current technical subcommittee and development and review team is responsible for preparing and submitting an annual report of the group's activities to the Standards Committee co-chairs.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill its mission as described above, the Standards Committee is specifically charged to:

  • Oversee the process of standards development by identifying standards needs; recommending to the Council the establishment of technical subcommittees or development and review teams, as necessary, to research, prepare, monitor, and review standards; and recommending action on proposed standards to the Council.
  • Develop, implement, and periodically review a profession-wide plan to address all standards needs across all the core competencies of the profession.
  • Monitor and review, and recommend for endorsement when appropriate, other national and international standards that affect archival practice.
  • Implement a process for the periodic review of all standards that are relevant to archival theory and practice.
  • Conduct maintenance reviews of SAA-adopted standards in accordance with established review cycles.
  • Publicize and promote standards-related news and information to the archives community.
  • Work in concert with the Program and Education committees and SAA staff to endorse and develop workshops, conference programs, and other educational opportunities related to archives standards.
  • Collaborate with international and national associations on standards development projects, with an understanding that the SAA Council must approve in advance all contractual and financial obligations.
  • Coordinate the work of SAA representatives to standards organizations.
  • Investigate for all SAA-developed standards the feasibility of adoption by the American National Standards Institute as a national standard.

VI. Meetings

The Standards Committee meets once per year at the SAA annual meeting. Depending on operational need and contingent on SAA Council funding, the Committee or subgroups of it may meet midyear. Periodic conference call meetings may be scheduled as needed. Although regular meetings are open to any SAA member who wishes to attend, the Committee shall also hold public meetings as needed at the SAA annual meeting to report on the progress of ongoing standards development or to review projects and to receive questions and suggestions.

 

Approved by the SAA Council: June 1991 (for a period of three years); June 1992, extended to June 1995
Revised: June 1998, February 2010, January 2011, January 2012, August 2013

Standards Development and Review

Responsibilities of the Standards Committee

A primary responsibility of the Standards Committee is to oversee the process of initiating, developing, reviewing, and approving all standards developed by the Society of American Archivists through its subgroups, as well as reviewing standards submitted by external groups to SAA for its endorsement.

The Standards Committee works with groups on standards and standards-related projects from the initiation of the proposal, through development or review, to submission of the standard to the SAA Council for final approval.

For additional information about Standards Committee procedures:

Standards

The SAA Standards Committee defines a “standard” to be an industry agreement that establishes qualities or practices that make possible sharing of information, development of common vocabularies and practices, and more effective interaction among archivists, librarians, records managers, information managers, preservation administrators, historians, and other allied professionals. SAA standards must be approved by the SAA Council and they are maintained and periodically reviewed by professionals in the community.

Standards of many types are now central to archival practice. This document will generally use the term “standards” to refer to all of these types, including standards used in automated information systems, in preservation management, and in other technical areas, as well as standards and guidelines relating to professional practice.

Standards can take many forms:

  • The most exacting are technical standards (e.g., Z39.50, the standard for intersystem data searching and retrieval) which, if applied correctly, can be expected to produce uniform and consistent results.
  • Conventions or rules are more flexible and can accommodate more variation in local practice (e.g., Describing Archives: A Content Standard [DACS]). They will produce similar, but not necessarily identical, results when applied consistently.
  • Guidelines provide models of preferred practices and/or serve as criteria against which to measure products or programs (e.g., Archival and Special Collections Facilities Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Architects, and Engineers).
  • Best practices are procedures and guidelines based on experience and research that demonstrate that they are optimal and efficient means to produce a desired result.¹ Best practices represent consensus on archival practice.

The Standards Committee will not be concerned with the creation and maintenance of thesauri.

Developing Standards within SAA

The Society of American Archivists recognizes the central importance of consensus to the development of standards. However, consensus on a specific standard may not always equate with unanimous and unqualified approval by all concerned, for in most cases this will be difficult to achieve.

The Standards Committee procedures for standards development within SAA mandate broad review of any proposed standard by all groups, both inside and outside of SAA, that have an interest in the standard. Important features of the review process are:

  • Establishment of the need for the standard through a formal "request for initiation of a standards project";
  • Publication of notices in appropriate SAA media about initiation and ongoing progress in standards development projects;
  • Publication and/or distribution of full texts of proposed standards by the SAA office; and
  • Formal invitations to representatives from outside organizations to participate in the development and/or review of drafts of proposed standards.

The Standards Committee is concerned both with the development of new standards and with the process of standards maintenance and review.

The best possible effort will be made to ensure that all reasonable opinions are considered in the development process and that most disputes are resolved before a document is deemed ready for the Council's consideration as an SAA standard.

Final adoption of a document as an SAA standard rests with the Council of the Society of American Archivists.

Once a standard is adopted, an ongoing technical subcommittee of the Standards Committee is assigned maintenance responsibilities to ensure that the document is promulgated widely, monitored in its application, and reviewed (and, if necessary, revised) on a regular schedule.

The Standards Committee has prepared detailed procedures for standards development and review.

SAA also plays an important role as a participant in work undertaken by other organizations that develop technical standards, such as the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) and the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM).

For Information or Assistance

The Standards Committee is ready to assist any SAA subgroup or outside organization to devise a strategy for developing a new standard or for reviewing and/or revising an existing document so that it can be considered for formal adoption as an SAA standard. Please contact the co-chairs of the Standards Committee for further information. [Member Roster]

 

Approved by SAA Council: June 1995
Revised: February 2010, January 2012

 


¹ The Standards Committee has modified the best practice definition from: A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology. Retrieved May 26, 2009, from: http://www.archivists.org/glossary/term_details.asp?DefinitionKey=1770

Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard

I. Submission of a Proposal for a Project to Create, Revise, or Review an SAA-Developed Standard

Proposals must be submitted by official groups within the SAA. Individuals interested in the development of a standard may consult with the Standards Committee about groups that are appropriate for submission of a standards proposal.

I.A. The proposing group shall:

Complete and submit the PROPOSAL FOR STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT form. The form shall include:

  • Name of sponsoring group and name of individual to contact;
  • Concise statement of identified need for standard;
  • Expected effect/impact on individuals and institutions;
  • Scope of coverage/application;
  • Anticipated format and content of the standard;
  • Known existing standards that are closely related to or affected by the proposed standard;
  • List of other SAA subgroups, outside organizations, and experts who will be consulted during the development or will be asked to review the standard before it is submitted for adoption by the SAA Council;
  • Time table for development process; and
  • Budgetary implications for SAA, including direct costs for meetings, travel, copying, and postage as well as indirect costs for SAA staff time.

I.B. The Standards Committee co-chairs shall:

I.B.1. Acknowledge receipt of the STANDARD PROPOSAL FORM to the proposing body and notify the Standards Committee of the proposal submission.

I.B.2. Distribute copies of the STANDARD PROPOSAL FORM to the other members of the Standards Committee, including the subgroup chairs and the SAA Council liaison. Subgroup chairs may distribute the proposal to their technical subcommittee or development and review team for comment.

I.B.3. Collect comments and suggestions from members of the Standards Committee and other subgroups to which the proposal was distributed.

I.B.4. If comments warrant further discussion, arrange for communications to determine if there is a consensus to endorse the proposal.

II. Standards Committee Action in Response to Proposal

The Standards Committee will take a formal vote in response to the proposal, and will take one of the following actions in response to a proposal, as appropriate:

II.A. Return for revision

The Standards Committee will return to the proposing group a STANDARD PROPOSAL FORM that is incomplete or that requires revision and request that it be revised and resubmitted.

II.B. Decline proposal

The Standards Committee may decline to recommend undertaking a standards project because

  1. A similar standard already exists;
  2. The proposed standard is in direct conflict with an SAA-adopted standard or policy;
  3. Another group is already working on a similar standard (in which case the Standards Committee will suggest that the two parties work together toward common ends);
  4. There is insufficient demand or potential benefit to SAA members to warrant the expense of its development;
  5. The proposed standard does not fall within the scope of the Standards Committee.

The Standards Committee will forward all declined proposals to the SAA Council along with the reason why the Standards Committee does not recommend the proposal. The proposing group may file an appeal with the SAA Council within 60 days of notification by the Committee.

II.C. Submit request for Council approval to undertake project

If the Standards Committee is satisfied with the proposal, it will be submitted with a recommendation by the Committee to the Council for final approval. The Standards Committee will send the STANDARD PROPOSAL FORM and any accompanying correspondence or other documentation to the SAA Council for approval to undertake the project.

If the SAA Council approves the project, the following actions shall occur:

II.C.I. Announcement of standards project.

The Standards Committee will publish a “Notice of Intention to Initiate a Standards Development Project” via all appropriate SAA media. This step is taken to notify the membership that a project will soon be under way and to solicit comments and participation from interested parties. Official project approval will be granted automatically 30 days after publication of the "Notice" unless the comments received by the Standards Committee co-chairs are such that the proposal warrants reconsideration, in which case the Committee will refer the proposal and comments back to the proposing group for review and response.

II.C.2. Make assignment to primary group for development.

For approved standards development projects, the Standards Committee co-chairs will prepare a draft charge for the development and review team and make recommendations for its membership. In most cases, the members of the proposing group will be included in the recommendation for membership of the development and review team. The charge must then be approved by the SAA Council before the SAA vice president / president-elect appoints the chair(s) and members of the development and review team. Once the standard is adopted, the team will be disbanded by the SAA Council and the Council will create a technical subcommittee to maintain and review the adopted standard (see V.C.I.).

III. Standards Development Process

In the course of developing a new standard, development and review teams shall complete the following actions:

III.A. Consultation with other SAA subgroups and external organizations

The development and review team will engage in extensive consultation with interested parties inside and outside of SAA that are essential to the development of standards, and must submit to the Standards Committee evidence that such consultation has taken place. The development and review team must address all written comments sent to the group and all comments made at an SAA open meeting. The Standards Committee will assist the development and review team in publicizing the project and identifying consultants.

Consultation should be pursued through several means, such as:

III.A.1. Letters sent at the beginning of the project to heads of organizations known to have an interest in the standard under development, inviting their comments and/or participation in the development process, as appropriate.

III.A.2. Publication of notices in the newsletters or on the websites of these organizations about the intention to develop the standard and, later, providing updates on the progress of the development project.

III.A.3. Publication of the draft standard in appropriate SAA media.

III.A.4. Publication of the draft standard in external publications and/or circulation of the draft standard to heads of interested organizations.

III.A.5. Circulation of the draft standard to groups and individuals, inside and outside of SAA, with particular interest or expertise in the topic, including posting on electronic networks.

III.A.6. Joint meetings with interested organizations to discuss common concerns. These meetings could occur at the outset of the project or after circulation of a draft standard.

III.A.7. Open forums or hearings at the SAA annual meeting.

III.B. Preparation of the package containing the final draft of the standard and supporting documentation

Once it has completed the consultation process and prepared the final draft of the standard, the development and review team will compile a package to forward to the Standards Committee for its review. This package will include:

III.B.1. Full text of the proposed standard.

III.B.2. Introductory narrative.

This section must include the scope of application, in particular:

  • The purpose or objective of the proposed standard and
  • The specific audiences, circumstances, or techniques to which it is directed.
  • It should also contain background and other supplementary information, as necessary, that can provide a context for understanding how the standard was developed and when and how it will be used, including
  • Brief history and methodology of its development,
  • Participants in the development process,
  • Relationship to predecessor documents,
  • Significant changes from earlier versions,
  • Glossary or definitions of terms, if necessary,
  • Illustrations or examples of how the standard can be applied, and
  • Bibliography, if necessary.

III.B.3. Documentation of the consultation process.

The development and review team must submit documentation that the consultation process has taken place and that a reasonable agreement has been reached on the contents and intent of the proposed standard. This evidence may take the form of:

  • Copies of correspondence from other organizations supporting the proposed standard;
  • Clippings from publications and/or websites that publicized the development project or published drafts of the standard;
  • Copies of correspondence discussing areas of dispute in the proposed standard;
  • In case of unresolved disputes, explanations from the group responsible for development of efforts made to accommodate the expressed concerns and/or justification for approving the standard in the absence of universal agreement.

III.B.4. Maintenance and review plan.

The development and review team must recommend a plan for maintenance and review of the standard it has developed. Standards developed by SAA will be assigned to a component group, such as a technical subcommittee, for necessary maintenance and review. Each will be either assigned to a review cycle of no more than 5 years, or approved for ongoing review. At the end of a set review cycle, the SAA Council will be asked by the Standards Committee to reaffirm, revise, or rescind the standard. The "Maintenance and Review Plan" will suggest the appropriate subgroup for assignment and type of review process. (See V.C. - V.E.)

III.C. Notice of abandoned project

In the event that the development and review team fails to reach general agreement on a draft standard or, for whatever reason, chooses to discontinue its work on the proposed standard, it shall notify the Standards Committee that it has abandoned the project. The Standards Committee shall publish a notice in appropriate SAA media that the project has been discontinued.

IV. Standards Committee Review of Draft Standard

Upon receiving the final draft package from the development and review team, the Standards Committee will take the following actions:

IV.A. Review package

The Standards Committee will review the package to ensure that it is complete and that adequate consultation and review have taken place. It may return the package to the development and review team if significant elements are missing.

IV.B. Notice of project completion/publication of revised draft standard

IV B.1. Notice of project completion.

When the final draft package is deemed complete, the Standards Committee will publish a notice in the appropriate SAA media announcing that the standards development project has been completed and the draft standard has been forwarded to the Council. (See IV.C.)

IV B.2. Publication of revised draft standard.

Based on the substance of the revisions, the potential breadth of impact, and any apparent remaining substantive conflicts on content, the Standards Committee may determine that the entire revised text should be published via an appropriate SAA medium in order to ensure the broadest possible participation in and awareness of the standards development process. The Standards Committee will accept written comments on the revised draft addressed to the Standards Committee co-chairs within 30 days of publication of the revised draft or notice of the availability of the revised draft.

If additional comments received after publication of the revision indicate widespread disagreement about the revised draft within the SAA membership, the Committee may determine that the draft should be referred back to the development and review team for response. Substantive changes to the draft standard as a result of these additional comments may require publication of a new "Notice of Completion" and notification or publication of a new revised draft.

The Standards Committee may determine that issues raised in the additional comments were already addressed adequately during the development and consultation process. The Standards Committee will then publish the notice of completion and forward the package to the SAA Council.

IV.C. Recommendation to the SAA Council

At the conclusion of the development process, the Standards Committee will send to the SAA Council a report on the process and a recommendation.

IV.C.1. Recommendation to consider adoption.

When the Standards Committee is satisfied that the development and consultation process has been completed satisfactorily it will, after publication of the notice, forward the package to the SAA Council with a recommendation that the Council consider adopting the draft document as an official standard of the Society of American Archivists.

IV.C.2. Report on "irreconcilable differences."

After reviewing all documentation, the Standards Committee may determine that disagreements raised represent substantive irreconcilable differences of views or professional positions. In this situation, the Standards Committee will forward the package to the SAA Council with an explanation of the remaining problems and, depending on the type of standard and breadth of impact, may or may not recommend that the Council consider adopting the draft as an official standard of the Society of American Archivists.

V. Promulgation, Maintenance, and Review of Adopted Standards

The Standards Committee shall ensure that the following actions are taken for each standard that is formally adopted by the SAA Council. Often the group that developed the standard will be actively involved in or have primary responsibility for these activities.

V.A. Publication of the standard

V.A.1. Full text in the SAA newsletter.

The preferred method of publication will be to publish the full text of the adopted standard in the Society’s newsletter and on the SAA website.

V.A.2. Notice of availability in newsletter.

Some standards may be too long to publish in the newsletter. For these, a notice of their approval and a summary of their contents will be published in the next SAA newsletter and/or on the SAA website, along with information about how to obtain a copy from the SAA website.

V.A.3. Added to Standards Portal webpage.

SAA staff will post all formally adopted standards on the Standards Portal webpage with the following information: 1) the name of the standard, 2) a description of the standard, 3) a link to the full text of the standard or a description of where the standard can be obtained, 4) the date on which the standard was adopted, 5) next review date of the standard, 6) information about how comments and feedback for revision can be submitted, and 7) any additional supporting documents or information.

V.B. Promotion of the standard

V.B.1. Notice to heads of allied professional organizations.

The SAA president and/or executive director will send a letter and copy of the adopted standard to all interested outside organizations to notify them of SAA's action. The Standards Committee will assist the group that developed the standard in drafting the letter and identifying which groups to contact.

V.B.2. Press release to editors of professional journals and newsletters.

The executive director will, in cooperation with the Standards Committee and development and review team, ensure that a press release is distributed to editors of allied professional journals and newsletters to announce the development and approval of the standard, providing its full text when possible.

V.B.3. Other publicity.

For standards of interest beyond professional circles, the executive director, Standards Committee, and development and review team will determine how best to publicize their approval. Working in concert with the Program and Education committees and the SAA staff, the Standards Committee will assist the subgroup in developing workshops, conference sessions, or public forums on the new standard.

V.C. Maintenance of the standard

Immediately upon adoption of an SAA standard, the following actions shall occur:

V.C.1. Technical subcommittee responsible for maintenance and review assigned.

As part of the approval process, the SAA Council will assign the standard to an ongoing SAA component group for maintenance and review. An SAA technical subcommittee may be established for this maintenance and review. The Standards Committee co-chairs will prepare a draft charge for the subcommittee and make recommendations for its membership. In most cases, the members of the development and review team who were actively involved in the development of the standards will be included in the recommendation for membership of the technical subcommittee. The charge must then be approved by the SAA Council before the vice president / president-elect appoints the chair(s) and members of the subcommittee.

V.C.2. Review cycle set.

All adopted SAA standards will be either assigned a review cycle of no more than five years, with a formal review commencing no later than three years following adoption or reaffirmation (section V.D.), or approved for ongoing review (seciton V.E.). However, in both stituations, comments and revisions to the standard and proposals to revise adopted standards may be submitted at any time. At the end of an assigned review cycle, the SAA Council will be asked to reaffirm, agree to revise, or rescind the standard.

V.C.3. Monitoring and promulgating use begins.

The maintaining technical subcommittee will be responsible for promoting the proper and effective use of the standard and will regularly obtain comments and feedback on the standard for future review and revision.

V.D. Cyclical review of the standard

At least two years before the review cycle expires, the Standards Committee will notify the maintaining technical subcommittee that it should initiate a formal review of the content and use of the standard. The following actions shall be taken:

V.D.1. Review plan prepared.

In consultation with the Standards Committee, the technical subcommittee will prepare a plan that will ensure consensus using the same kinds of broadly based consultation and review that occurred when the standard was originally developed. The plan may include:

  • Other SAA subgroups and interested organizations outside of SAA that the technical subcommittee plans to consult;
  • Proposed joint meetings with some of these subgroups and/or organizations to discuss proposed revisions;
  • Proposed public hearings at the SAA Annual Meeting;
  • Proposed publications, websites, or other communication media via which comments and proposed revisions will be submitted and be made publicly available; and
  • Financial resources needed for review, such as travel or editorial support.

V.D.2. Standards Committee and SAA Council review plan.

The technical subcommittee will submit the plan to the Standards Committee, at which point the Standards Committee will decide whether the review process is adequate. If significant financial resources are required for review, the Standards Committee will forward the plan to the SAA Council with a recommendation for funding.

V.D.3. Recommendation to revise, reaffirm, or rescind the standard.

Once the review plan has been approved, the technical subcommittee will commence the formal review. When adequate consultation has taken place, the technical subcommittee will recommend one of the following:

Revise the standard: Revision will be necessary if substantial changes to the standard are required.

Reaffirm the standard: The technical subcommittee may decide that a standard does not need revision at this time if comments are relatively minor and the standard is still current and widely used. The technical subcommittee may also delay revision while awaiting the development or revision of another standard or project that may affect the standard under review.

Rescind the standard: The technical subcommittee may recommend rescinding the standard if the standard is no longer relevant or another standard has replaced it.

V.D.4. Recommendation to the SAA Council

The maintaining technical subcommittee will submit a package to the Standards Committee containing its recommendation to reaffirm, revise, or rescind the standard along with documentation about the review process (as in III.). If the technical subcommittee recommends revision, the technical subcommittee will also submit a completed proposal form (as in I.A.2.).

V.D.5. The Standards Committee will review the package to ensure that the review plan was adequate. Assuming that no procedural questions remain unresolved, it will forward the package to the Council with the recommendation to reaffirm, revise, or rescind.

V.D.6. The SAA Council votes on whether to reaffirm, revise, or rescind the standard.

If the Council votes to revise the standard, the technical subcommittee will continue the revision work. Once the revision has been completed, the technical subcommittee will follow the same process for submission and approval of a new standard, as outlined in sections III.B. and later.

If the Council reaffirms the standard, a new review cycle will be set, which may be shorter than five years. A new technical subcommittee may be appointed, if necessary. The technical subcommittee and the Standards Committee will inform all relevant parties that the standard has been reaffirmed and does not require revision at this time.

Should the Council vote to rescind the standard, the technical subcommittee and the Standards Committee will inform all relevant parties that the standard has been rescinded. The Standards Committee will then either remove the standard from the standards webpage or mark the standard as "rescinded."

V.D.7. Notice and publication of reaffirmed, revised, or rescinded standards.

An information dissemination process similar to that outlined under V.A. and V.B. for new standards will be followed to ensure broad awareness of SAA actions concerning reaffirmed, revised, and rescinded standards.

V.E. Ongoing review of the standard.

Proposed revisions to a standard approved for ongoing review are reviewed and addressed as they are received by the assigned technical subcommittee. Ongoing review is particularly conducive to standards that are electronically published and thus easy to update. In order to respond adequately and in a timely manner to proposals for change, the following actions should be taken:

V.E.1. Proposal for changes received.

Proposals may be submitted by SAA component groups (i.e., sections, roundtables, committees, task forces, or working groups), by interested external organizations (e.g., the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section), or may be generated by the technical subcommittee itself. Proposals should include:

  • Name of the sponsoring group;
  • Identification of the component of the standard to be changed;
  • Brief description of the proposed change, and justification;
  • Expected effect/impact on individuals, institutions, and supporting systems;
  • Known related standards affected by the proposed change.

All proposals should be submitted to the chair of the technical subcommittee responsible for the maintenance of the standard.

V.E.2. Technical subcommittee reviews proposals.

Upon receiving a proposal, the chair of the technical subcommittee shall:

  • Conduct a preliminary review of the document to ensure that it is complete. Incomplete proposals will be returned to the submitting body. If there are no problems with the document, the chair will acknowledge receipt to the proposing body.
  • Distribute copies of the proposal to the other members of the technical subcommittee for their review and comment.
  • Determine the extent to which the proposal should be distributed for public comment.

V.E.3. Consultation with other SAA subgroups and external organizations.

External groups, particularly those directly impacted by a proposal, must be consulted during the review process. This should include informing the Standards Committee co-chairs of the proposal submission. Consultation should be pursued through several means, which may include:

  • Publication of the proposal on the technical subcommittee's SAA microsite.
  • Letters sent to heads of organizations or organizations, or to individuals, inside and outside of SAA, known to have an interest in the standard under revision, inviting their comments on a particular proposal.
  • Publication of notices in the newsletters or on the websites of these organizations about the proposed change.
  • Publication of the proposal in appropriate SAA media.
  • Publication of the proposal in external publications.
  • Joint meetings with interested organizations to discuss the proposal.
  • Open forums or hearings at the SAA Annual Meeting.

V.E.4. Recommendation to revise the standard.

Based on comments received from the community, the technical subcommittee may either reject the proposal, or develop a recommendation for revisions to the standard. The draft revisions may be based on both the original proposal and amendments developed during the review process. Revision proposals should document changes in the standard in relation to the current text. Significant changes in the initial proposal by the technical subcommittee may require an additional period of consultation. The review and consultation process should be completed within six months of the submission of a proposal.

Once the draft revisions have been finalized, it should be forwarded to the Standards Committee together with documentation of the submission and consultation process.

V.E.5. Standards Committee review of recommended changes.

The Standards Committee will review the package to ensure that it is complete and that adequate consultation and review have taken place. It may return the package to the development and review team if significant elements are missing.

V.E.6. Recommendation to the SAA Council.

The Standards Committee will send to the SAA Council a report on the process and a recommendation. This may be either a recommendation to consider implementation of the draft revisions, or a recommendation against adoption. The decision to accept changes to official standards of the Society of American Archivists can only be made by the SAA Council.

When the draft revision documentation is deemed complete, the Standards Committee will publish a notice in the appropriate SAA media announcing that the draft revision has been forwarded to the Council.

V.E.6. Promulgation of revised standard.

If a draft revision is accepted by the SAA Council, the Standards Committee will publish a notice of the approval of the changes in the appropriate SAA media.

V.E.7. Major revisions or rescinding the standard.

In addition to managing proposals for revision, the technical subcommittee may also determine that the standard is no longer relevant or has been superseded, and may recommend that the standard be considered for major revisions or rescinded. The guidelines for cyclical review should be followed in developing such recommendations (see section V.D.).  The SAA Council may also establish a deadline for reviewing the applicability and maintenance of standards at their discretion.

VI. Council Fast-Track Procedures

In some cases the SAA Council may initiate, or encourage/approve a component group to initiate, the standards development process for best practices documents without seeking prior approval from the Standards Committee.  In these cases a subgroup of the Council functions as the standard development and review team and the standards approval process begins at step III as described above.

SAA Expert Groups (as identified by the Council) may also create best practice and/or guidelines as supports the mission of the Society and its members. In these cases the Expert Group functions as the standards development and review team and the standards approval process begins at Step III. 

Revised June 1995, February 2010, January 2012, August 2013, May 2014, July 2016

Procedures for SAA Endorsement of an External Standard

Proposals must be submitted by official groups within the SAA. Individuals who are interested in submitting a proposal for the endorsement of an external standard may consult with the Standards Committee on appropriate groups to which they may wish to submit a proposal.

I. Submission of a Proposal to Endorse an External Standard

I.A. The proposing group shall:

Complete and submit the PROPOSAL FOR ENDORSEMENT OF AN EXTERNAL STANDARD form. The form shall include:

  • Name of the standard;
  • Brief summary of the standard;
  • Sponsoring organization;
  • Location of the standard (website link, publication details, etc.);
  • Effect/impact of the standard on archival practice;
  • A discussion of how the standard is being used in the archives profession (Who is using it? How is it being used? Is it widely used?);
  • Review and revision procedures of the standard (Who reviews the standard? How often is the standard reviewed? Is the review process open?); and
  • Known existing standards that are closely related to or affected by the standard being proposed for endorsement.

I.B. The Standards Committee co-chairs shall:

I.B.1. Acknowledge receipt of the ENDORSEMENT PROPOSAL FORM to the proposing body and notify the Standards Committee of the proposal submission.

I.B.2. Distribute copies of the ENDORSEMENT PROPOSAL FORM to the other members of the Standards Committee, including the subgroup chairs and the SAA Council liaison. Subgroup chairs may distribute the proposal to their technical subcommittee or development and review team for comment.

I.B.3. Collect comments and suggestions from members of the Standards Committee and other subgroups to which the proposal was distributed.

I.B.4. If comments warrant further discussion, arrange for a discussion to determine whether there is a consensus to endorse the standard.

II. Standards Committee Action in Response to Proposal

The Standards Committee will take a formal vote in response to the proposal, and will take one of the following actions in response to a proposal, as appropriate:

II.A. Return for revision.

The Standards Committee will return to the submitting group a proposal form that is incomplete or that requires revision and request that it be revised and resubmitted.

II.B. Decline.

The Standards Committee may decline the endorsement of an external standard because: 1) the external standard is in direct conflict with an SAA-adopted standard or policy; 2) there is insufficient demand or potential benefit to SAA members; 3) the standard is not widely adopted or used in the archives field; or 4) the review process does not allow for SAA contribution or comment.

II.C. Endorse.

If the Standards Committee agrees that the external standard has benefit to the SAA community, it will recommend the standard to the SAA Council for endorsement. If the SAA Council endorses the standard, the Standards Committee will then take the following actions:

  1. Publish the full standard or link to the standard on the Standards Portal webpage along with the endorsement proposal.
  2. Notify the SAA community about the endorsement through appropriate SAA media.

 

Adopted by the SAA Council: February 2010, January 2012

Subcommittees of the Standards Committee

Technical Subcommittee on Archival Facilities Guidelines (TS-AFG)

I. Purpose

The Technical Subcommittee on Archival Facilities Guidelines (TS-AFG) of the SAA Standards Committee oversees the ongoing maintenance and development of Archives and Special Collections Facilities: Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Architects, and Engineers (“Facilities standard”), a standard adopted by SAA. The Technical Subcommittee also investigates the feasibility of expansion of the Facilities standard to a national standard and/or a multi-organizational standard.

II. Subcommittee Selection, Size, and Length of Term:

TS-AFG shall be charged for five years, beginning August 2010, or until revisions to the Facilities standard are completed as described in the Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard. [TS-AFG's original length of term was extended to August 2016 by the SAA Executive Committee on July 27, 2015. The term was further extended to August 2018 by the SAA Council in November 2016.] After revision work is completed, if the Facilities standard continues to be an approved standard of SAA, the TS-AFG shall be re-charged for a subsequent review cycle.

The members and chair(s) of the TS-AFG shall be appointed for the length of time necessary to complete revisions to the Facilities standard, which shall not exceed five years.

The Technical Subcommittee shall be composed of five to eight individuals, including the chair(s), to be recommended by the Standards Committee for appointment by the Vice President. The chair(s) and at least four other member of the Subcommittee shall be a member of SAA with demonstrated experience in archival facility issues. However, the Technical Subcommittee may include one to three members from other professions who have significant knowledge of and experience with archival facilities.

Ex officio members of the TS-AFG shall include the following:

  • Co-chairs of the Standards Committee;
  • Liaison from Canadian Council of Archives (CCA).

III. Reporting Procedures:

The chair(s) of the TS-AFG shall report at least annually to the chair(s) of the SAA Standards Committee at the SAA Annual Meeting. If extramural funding is obtained by the SAA, the chair(s) shall provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA office in order that reporting requirements of SAA and funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities:

To fulfill its mission as described above, the TS-AFG is specifically charged to:

  • Carry out the maintenance and development of Archives and Special Collections Facilities: Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Architects, and Engineers, an SAA standard, in accordance with the schedules laid out by the charges and SAA’s Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard.
  • Investigate expansion of the Facilities standard to a national standard in conjunction with the American National Standards Institute. A report and recommendations will be submitted to the Standards Committee in 2013.
  • Investigate expansion of the Facilities standard to a multi-organizational standard in conjunction with Candian Council of Archives. A report and recommendations will be submitted to the Standards Committee in 2013.
  • Promote the understanding and use of Archives and Special Collections Facilities: Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Architects, and Engineers by the American and international archival community.
  • Support SAA’s educational efforts related to Archives and Special Collections Facilities: Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Architects, and Engineers.

V. Meetings:

The TS-AFG shall carry out its charges primarily via electronic mail, regular mail, and conference calls. It may meet at the SAA Annual Meeting and as necessary provided that SAA Council-approved funding is available.

 

Revised by the SAA Council: January 2011; December 2013; July 2015; November 2016.

Technical Subcommittee on Describing Archives: A Content Standard (TS-DACS)

I. Purpose

The Technical Subcommittee for Describing Archives: A Content Standard (TS-DACS) of the SAA Standards Committee is responsible for overseeing the timely and ongoing intellectual and technical maintenance and development of Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS). DACS is an output-neutral set of rules for describing archives, personal papers, and manuscript collections, and can be applied to all material types. DACS is compatible with ISAD(G): General International Standard Archival Description, 2nd ed. (International Council on Archives, 1999) and ISAAR(CPF): International Standard Archival Authority Records for Corporate Bodies, Persons and Families, 2nd ed. (International Council on Archives, 2003). DACS is an SAA-approved standard; documentation for DACS is available through the Society of American Archivists at http://www.archivists.org/governance/standards/dacs.asp .

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The technical subcommittee shall be composed of seven regular  members (as well as one or two chairs, depending on the needs of the technical subcommittee, at the perogative of the current chair(s)). All members shall be appointed by the SAA Vice President / President-Elect for staggered three-year terms so that a minimum of two individuals are appointed by the Vice President each year. All members must demonstrate significant knowledge of and experience with archival description generally, and with DACS specifically.

All members of TS-DACS shall be recommended by the Standards Committee for appointment by the SAA Vice President. The chair(s) will be selected from existing TS-DACS membership and appointed for a three year term. The chair(s)  and members of TS-DACS may be reappointed for one consecutive term.

Ex officio members of the Technical Subcommittee on DACS shall include the following if they are not regular members of the subcommittee:

  • Co-chairs of the Standards Committee;
  • Chair of the Description Section;
  • Society of American Archivists’ representative to Committee on Cataloging: Description and Access (CC:DA);
  • Society of American Archivists’ representative to the MARC Advisory Committee;
  • Society of American Archivists’ representative to International Council on Archives Experts Group on Archival Description (ICA-EGAD) [formerly International Council on Archives Committee on Best Practices and Standards].

III. Reporting Procedures

The chair(s) of the Technical Subcommittee on DACS shall report at least annually to the chair(s) of the SAA Standards Committee on the occasion of the SAA Annual Meeting. If extramural funding is obtained by SAA, the chair(s) shall provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA office in order that the reporting requirements of SAA and the funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill this mission, TS-DACS is specifically charged to:

  • Carry out a review of Describing Archives: A Content Standard on an ongoing basis.
  • Promote the understanding and use of DACS by the American archival community.
  • Support educational efforts related to DACS by SAA.
  • Develop members of the archives profession who are capable of promoting and maintaining DACS over time.
  • Communicate its activities to relevant SAA components.
  • Foster communication between other entities developing standards related to DACS.
  • Work to ensure that DACS is compatible with other national and international descriptive standards.

TS-DACS shall work within the guidelines for ongoing review of an SAA-adopted standard, and may develop more detailed procedures for meeting those requirements.

 VI. Meetings

TS-DACS shall carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, regular mail, and conference calls. It shall meet at the SAA Annual Meeting and as necessary, provided that SAA Council-approved funding is available.

Approved by the SAA Council: February 2010
Revised: January 2011; August 2013; February 2017

Schema Development Team (Development and Review Team) (SDT-DRT)

I. Purpose

The Schema Development Team (SDT) of the SAA Standards Committee is responsible for development and editing of all Extensible Markup Language (XML) schemas, Document Type Definitions (DTD), and related technical documents maintained by SAA and its subgroups. These include the schemas and/or DTDs that express Encoded Archival Description (EAD), Encoded Archival Context – Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF), and any other markup standards developed by the Technical Subcommittee for Encoded Archival Description and the Technical Subcommittee on EAC-CPF.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The Schema Development Team shall be charged for one year, beginning February 2010, and continuing through the 2011 SAA annual meeting. If the Technical Subcommittee for EAD, the TS-EAC-CPF, or another SAA subgroup continues to be engaged in the active development or revision of XML encoding standards, the Schema Development Team shall be recharged annually on the occasion of the SAA annual meeting. If no SAA subgroup is actively engaged with the development or revision of an XML encoding standard, the Schema Development Team may be discharged.

The Schema Development Team shall have from three to five members, including a chair, to be recommended by the Standards Committee for appointment by the Vice President. The chair shall be a member of SAA, but the Schema Development Team should include international members. The number of members shall vary depending on the SDT's workload. If additional members are deemed necessary, the chair shall make a recommendation to the Standards Committee. The members and chair may be reappointed to the Schema Development Team for consecutive terms, but at least one new member must be appointed every five years. All members shall demonstrate experience with the design and syntax of schemas and/or DTDs.

Ex officio members shall include the following:

  • Chair of the Standards Committee (or an appointed representative);
  • Chair(s) of the Technical Subcommittee for EAD;
  • Chair(s) of the TS-EAC-CPF;
  • Chair of any future SAA group responsible for XML schemas and/or DTDs.

III. Reporting Procedures

The chair of the Schema Development Team shall report at least annually to the chairs of the SAA Standards Committee, the TS-EAD, and the TS-EAC-CPF on the occasion of the SAA annual meeting. If extramural funding is obtained by SAA, the chair shall provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA office in order that the reporting requirements of SAA and the funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill its mission as described above, the Schema Development Team is specifically charged to:

  • Carry out, under the direction of the Technical Subcommittee for Encoded Archival Description (TS-EAD) and the TS-EAC-CPF, the maintenance and ongoing development of their respective standards, in accordance with the schedules laid out by their charges and SAA's Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard.*

* All revisions to technical standards must have the approval of the appropriate maintaining body.

VI. Meetings

 

The Schema Development Team shall carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, regular mail, and conference calls. It shall meet with the Technical Subcommittee for EAD and the TS-EAC-CPF at the SAA annual meeting and as necessary with funding from SAA or from extramural sources (with prior approval by the SAA Council).

 

Approved by the SAA Council: February 2010

Technical Subcommittee on Encoded Archival Context for Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (TS-EAC-CPF)

I. Purpose

The Technical Subcommittee on Encoded Archival Context – Corporate bodies, Persons, and Families (TS-EAC-CPF) of the SAA Standards Committee is responsible for overseeing the timely and ongoing intellectual and technical maintenance and development of Encoded Archival Context – Corporate bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF). EAC-CPF is the internationally accepted XML (Extensible Markup Language) standard for the transmission of descriptions of the corporate, personal, and familial creators and subjects of archival records. EAC-CPF is compatible with ISAAR (CPF): International Standard Archival Authority Record for Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families, 2nd ed. (International Congress on Archives, 2004). EAC-CPF is an SAA-adopted standard; documentation is hosted by the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin at http://eac.staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/.

II. Subcommittee Selection, Size, and Length of Term:

TS-EAC-CPF shall be charged for the equivalent of five years, beginning in 2011, with the charge expiring at the 2015 SAA Annual Meeting. TS-EAC-CPF will complete a review of the Encoded Archival Context – Corporate bodies, Persons, and Families according to the SAA Standards Committee's Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard before its charge expires. After the review is completed, if EAC-CPF continues to be an adopted standard of SAA, the TS-EAC-CPF may be re-charged for a subsequent review cycle.

The members and chair(s) of the TS-EAC-CPF shall be appointed for a full five-year term. The technical subcommittee shall be composed of at least five individuals who are members of SAA and shall include sufficient international membership to ensure effective representation of EAC-CPF professional communities outside of the United States. All members shall demonstrate significant knowledge of and experience with archival description generally, and with EAC-CPF specifically.

TS-EAC-CPF shall have a chair who is a member of the Society of American Archivists. The technical subcommittee is encouraged to have a co-chair from among its international members.

The SAA members of the TS-EAC-CPF shall be recommended by the Standards Committee for appointment by the Vice President. International members who are able to represent other professional EAC-CPF-using communities effectively shall be appointed at the recommendation of the TS-EAC-CPF chair(s), who is/are responsible for ensuring appropriately diverse international representation. Members and chairs may be reappointed to the TS-EAC-CPF for consecutive review cycles, but at least one new SAA member must be appointed per review cycle.

Ex officio members of the Technical Subcommittee for EAC-CPF shall include the following if they are not regular members of the subcommittee:

  • Co-chairs of the Standards Committee;
  • Chair(s) of the Technical Subcommittee for Encoded Archival Description;
  • Chair of the Schema Development Team;
  • Chair of the EAD Roundtable;
  • Liaison from the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin;
  • Liaison from OCLC Research.

III. Reporting Procedures:

The chair(s) of TS-EAC-CPF shall report at least annually to the chair of the SAA Standards Committee at the SAA Annual Meeting. If extramural funding is obtained by the SAA, the chair(s) shall provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA office in order that reporting requirements of SAA and funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities:

To fulfill this mission internationally, the TS-EAC-CPF is specifically charged to:

  • Revise the EAC-CPF tag library and other official documentation as necessary.
  • Promote the understanding and use of EAC-CPF internationally.
  • Support educational efforts related to EAC-CPF by SAA and international communities.
  • Develop members of the archives profession who are capable of promoting and maintaining EAC-CPF over time.
  • Communicate its activities to relevant SAA components and EAC-CPF-using communities internationally.
  • Collaborate as needed with the Schema Development Team to maintain the relevant EAC-CPF schemas.

V. Meetings:

The TS-EAC-CPF shall carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, regular mail, and conference calls. It may meet at the SAA Annual Meeting and as necessary provided that SAA Council-approved funding is available.

Revised by the SAA Council: January 27, 2011

Technical Subcommittee on Encoded Archival Description (TS-EAD)

I. Purpose

The Technical Subcommittee for Encoded Archival Description (TS-EAD) of the SAA Standards Committee is responsible for overseeing the timely and ongoing intellectual and technical maintenance and development of Encoded Archival Description (EAD). EAD is the internationally accepted XML (Extensible Markup Language) standard for the transmission of finding aids. EAD is compatible with ISAD(G): General International Standard Archival Description, 2nd ed. (International Congress on Archives, 1999). EAD is an SAA-approved standard; documentation is hosted by the Library of Congress at http://www.loc.gov/ead/.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The TS-EAD shall be charged for five years, beginning February 2010, with the charge expiring at the SAA annual meeting of the fifth year, or until the revision of EAD is completed as described in the “Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard,” whichever is shorter. After the charge is completed, if Encoded Archival Description continues to be an approved standard of SAA, the TS-EAD shall be re-charged for a subsequent review cycle.

The members and chair(s) of the TS-EAD shall be appointed for the length of time necessary to complete a revision of EAD, which shall not exceed five years. The technical subcommittee shall have five members who are members of SAA and sufficient international membership to ensure effective representation of EAD professional communities outside the United States. All members shall demonstrate significant knowledge of and experience with archival description generally, and with EAD specifically.

The TS-EAD shall have a chair who is a member of the Society of American Archivists. The technical subcommittee is encouraged to have a co-chair from among its international members.

SAA members of the TS-EAD shall be recommended by the Standards Committee for appointment by the Vice President. International members who are able to represent other professional EAD-using communities effectively shall be appointed at the recommendation of the TS-EAD chair(s), who is/are responsible for ensuring appropriately diverse international representation. Members and chairs may be reappointed to the TS-EAD for consecutive review cycles, but at least one new SAA member must be appointed per review cycle.

Ex officio members of the Technical Subcommittee for EAD shall include the following if they are not regular members of the subcommittee:

  • Chair of the Standards Committee (or an appointed representative);
  • Chair(s) of the EAC Working Group (or any successor committee);
  • Chair and members of the Schema Development Team;
  • Chair of the EAD Roundtable;
  • Liaison from the Network Development and MARC Standards Office of the Library of Congress;
  • Liaison from OCLC Research.

III. Reporting Procedures

The chair (or co-chairs) of the Technical Subcommittee for EAD shall report at least annually to the chair of the SAA Standards Committee on the occasion of the SAA annual meeting. If extramural funding is obtained by SAA, the chair (or co-chairs) shall provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA office in order that the reporting requirements of SAA and the funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill this mission internationally, the TS-EAD is specifically charged to:

  • Carry out a review of EAD at least every five years and revise as needed.*
  • Revise the EAD tag library and other official documentation as necessary.
  • Promote the understanding and use of EAD internationally.
  • Support educational efforts related to EAD by SAA and international communities.
  • Develop members of the archives profession who are capable of promoting and maintaining EAD over time.
  • Communicate its activities to relevant SAA components and EAD-using communities internationally.
  • Collaborate as needed with the Schema Development Team to maintain the relevant EAD schemas and/or Document Type Definitions (DTDs).

* For this charge, in lieu of a standard review cycle, the TS-EAD shall undertake a revision of EAD 2002, which is to be completed in no more than five years (i.e., by August 2015).

VI. Meetings

The TS-EAD shall carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, regular mail, and conference calls. It shall meet at the SAA annual meeting and as necessary with funding from SAA or from extramural sources (with prior approval by the SAA Council).

 

Approved by the SAA Council: February 2010

Technical Subcommittee on Encoded Archival Standards (TS-EAS)

I. Purpose

The Technical Subcommittee for Encoded Archival Standards (TS-EAS) is responsible for the ongoing maintenance of EAD and EAC-CPF, including all schemas and related code, as well as the development of future companion standards, such as the proposed Encoded Archival Context for Functions. Its membership will be sufficient to encompass the necessary domain expertise for each standard and schema development, and will include broad international representation including SAA members and other professionals from the international archival community. The members of the committee will foster the thoughtful evolution of archival encoding standards on behalf of and in consultation with the global archival community and in close collaboration with the International Council on Archives Experts Group on Archival Description.

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The technical subcommittee shall be composed of between fifteen and twenty members (including two co-chairs) appointed by the SAA Vice President / President-Elect for staggered three-year terms so that a minimum of three individuals are appointed by the Vice President each year. The committee will reflect the international nature of the standards it develops, and will include balanced representation from its user communities.  A majority of the committee members will be members of SAA unless sufficient expertise is not available within the SAA membership, in which case the composition of the committee may be adjusted at the discretion of the Council. All members shall demonstrate significant knowledge of and experience with archival schemas generally, and with EAD and EAC-CPF specifically. The chairs and members of TS-EAS may be reappointed.

The Technical Subcommittee for Encoded Archival Standards co-chairs will be appointed by the SAA Vice President / President-Elect, and serve as the primary contact between TS-EAS, SAA, the Standards Committee, and other related organizations. At least one co-chair will be a member of SAA. 

Ex officio members of TS-EAS shall include the following if they are not regular members of the subcommittee:

  • Co-chairs of the Standards Committee;
  • Chair or co-chairs of the EAD Roundtable;
  • Representative from International Council on Archives Experts Group on Archival Description, Committee on Best Practices and Standards, or other groups as appropriate.
  • Representatives from institutions hosting technical documentation for standards maintained by TS-EAS (e.g., Library of Congress for EAD and the Staatsbibliotek zu Berlin for EAC-CPF).

III. Reporting Procedures

The co-chairs of TS-EAS shall report at least annually to the chairs of the SAA Standards Committee. They will coordinate meeting logistics at the SAA annual meeting and elsewhere, establish TS-EAS priorities and agendas, coordinate dissemination of news from TS-EAS, work with related SAA section and roundtable leaders, and oversee and support the work of various TS-EAS standard leads. If extramural funding is obtained by SAA, the co-chairs shall provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA office in order that the reporting requirements of SAA and the funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

Within TS-EAS, a member will be designated by the co-chairs as the lead for each standard being maintained or developed. Each standard lead will be responsible, with the support of the co-chairs, for soliciting and compiling comments, logging bugs, leading discussion of proposed changes, articulating and justifying changes to the international community, and coordinating as necessary with other standard leads. There will also be a lead for schema design who will be responsible, with the support of the co-chairs, for coordinating work on schemas and related code and maintaining appropriate GitHub repositories.  The TS-EAS co-chairs will also designate a committee member to serve as a secretary, responsible for taking and distributing meeting minutes. 

Additional ad hoc subgroups within TS-EAS may be formed to address specific issues on a project basis (e.g., a tag library editorial team).

VI. Meetings

TS-EAS shall carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, regular mail, and conference calls. It shall meet at the SAA annual meeting and as necessary with funding from SAA or from extramural sources (with prior approval by the SAA Council).

 

Approved by the SAA Council: November 2015

Technical Subcommittee on Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning (TS-GRD)

I. Purpose

The Technical Subcommittee on Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning (TS-GRD) of the SAA Standards Committee is responsible for overseeing the timely and ongoing maintenance and development of Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning. These guidelines provide resources, recommended procedures, and other information for archivists who may be involved in reviewing their institutional holdings. Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning is an SAA-approved standard and is available via the SAA Standards Portal (http://www2.archivists.org/standards/).

II. Committee Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The TS-GRD shall be charged for five years, beginning August 2012, with the charge expiring at the SAA Annual Meeting of the fifth year. After the charge is completed, if the Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning continues to be an approved standard of SAA, the TS-GRD shall be re-charged for a subsequent review cycle.

The technical subcommittee shall be composed of three to six individuals, including the chair(s), to be recommended by the Standards Committee for appointment by the Vice President. All members shall demonstrate significant knowledge of and experience with archival appraisal. Members and chairs may be reappointed to the TS-GRD for consecutive review cycles, but at least one new SAA member must be appointed per review cycle.

Ex officio members of the Technical Subcommittee for Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning shall include the following if they are not regular members of the Subcommittee:

  • Chair of the Standards Committee (or an appointed representative);
  • Chair of the Acquisitions and Appraisal Section.

III. Reporting Procedures

The chair(s) of the TS-GRD shall report at least annually to the chair(s) of the SAA Standards Committee on the occasion of the SAA Annual Meeting.  If extramural funding is obtained by SAA, the chair (or co-chairs) shall provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA office in order that the reporting requirements of SAA and the funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill this mission, the TS-GRD is specifically charged to:

  • Carry out the maintenance and development of Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning, an SAA standard, in accordance with the schedule laid out by the charges and SAA's Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard.
  • Promote the understanding and use of Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning by the archival community.
  • Support SAA’s educational efforts related to Guidelines for Reappraisal and Deaccessioning by SAA.

VI. Meetings

The TS-GRD shall carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, regular mail, and conference calls. It shall meet at the SAA Annual Meeting and as necessary with funding from SAA or from extramural sources (with prior approval by the SAA Council.

Adopted by the SAA Council: May 23, 2012.

Section VIII: Task Forces

A. Purpose

  1. The SAA Council establishes task forces to deal with matters of special concern to the Society and the profession. Task forces are given specific charges to study and evaluate certain issues, prepare reports and study documents, and, when deemed appropriate, make recommendations for action by the Council.
  2. The work of task forces usually occurs within a prescribed period of time specified by the Council in charging the task force, such as from one Annual Meeting to the next. The duration of the task force may be extended by Council action as needed to ensure that the work is completed.
  3. When a task force is disbanded, existing SAA bodies such as committees, sections, and roundtables may continue attention to the area it addressed. In some instances, a new SAA body may be formed to follow up the work of a task force.

B. Membership

  1. Members of task forces, including the chair(s), are appointed by the vice president / president-elect, and generally serve for the term of the task force. Membership on task forces is open to all SAA members. In making appointments to task forces, the vice president / president-elect gives special consideration to section and roundtable leaders and members who may have a particular interest in the matter of special concern. 
  2. Members of the Council may serve on task forces when their expertise is useful in the matter of special concern. Council members should not typically serve as task force chairs unless a compelling reason exists for them to do so. Task forces will have a Council liaison appointed to the task force when the task force membership does not include at least one Council member.
  3. A minimum of one half of the members of any task force are appointed from SAA members or others who are not currently serving on the SAA Council.
  4. As needed, individuals who are not SAA members but who have specific knowledge or skills may be appointed to an SAA task force.
  5. Generally SAA staff members do not serve as task force members, but they may be assigned to provide staff support to task forces.
  6. To encourage participation in the work of a task force by those who seek to gain expertise in that area, interns may be appointed to task forces generally for the duration of the task force, but not to exceed 18 months. Interns, who are appointed by the vice president / president-electt in consultation with the chair, serve as nonvoting members for a term of one year, and are expected to attend the SAA Annual Meeting and assist in the work of the group throughout the year.
  7. The process for the removal of a non-participating task force member is specified in the Policy for Removing a Non-Participating Member from a Council-Appointed Group.

C. Consultation and Reporting

  1. Task force are expected to communicate with other SAA bodies engaged in similar undertakings. In the course of their investigations, task forces ordinarily are expected to communicate by direct means, or to use the Society’s electronic announcement lists and website to alert section and roundtable leaders, or the membership when appropriate, of special matters that they are considering that may affect SAA policy, organizational structure, or new program initiatives. Member comments will be considered by task forces and reported to the Council.
  2. Task forces work closely with their Council liaisons and the Executive Director to ensure that they are responsive to the needs of the Society as outlined in their charge. Communications with the Council are directed through both Council liaison and executive director.
  3. Each task force is expected to report progress towards fulfilling its assigned charge for every Council meeting during the term specified for the task force. Task force chairs must meet the timeline specified by the executive director for submitting agenda items and supporting documents for each meeting of the Council. All task force reports must use the Council Report Template.  A task force’s final report should be identified as such.
  4. Because of the limited term of appointment, task forces are not expected to submit annual reports to the Council on the schedule specified for other SAA component groups.

D. Meetings

  1. Funding for task force meetings, if available, is typically stipulated in the Council’s charge to the task force. The standard expectation is that the bulk, if not all, of a task force’s work will be done utilizing emails, conference calls (supported by the SAA Office), and free tools. A task force whose term extends over an Annual Meeting is encouraged to request space (on a timetable established and publicized by the executive director) and hold an in-person meeting at the conference hotel, travel and accommodations for which are the responsibility of task force members.
  2. SAA funding for additional in-person meetings not specified in Council’s charge to a task force is not typically available, but requests for such funding may be discussed with the task force’s Council liaison and the executive director.

Adopted by Council: June 1991
Revised: June 1992, August 2007, July 2013, November 2014

Index of Past Task Force Reports

SAA-ACRL/RBMS Joint Task Force on the Development of Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy (Affiliated Group)

I. Purpose

The SAA-ACRL/RBMS Joint Task Force on the Development of Guidelines for Primary Source Literacy (hereafter “Task Force”) is responsible for the development of guidelines (hereafter “Guidelines”) that will provide competency standards for primary source literacy. Guidelines will consider and address students’ ability to interpret and analyze primary sources and students’ understanding of and ability to apply effective research skills across multiple disciplines. The Guidelines might also address ethical uses of primary sources, the understanding of legal and social implications of records, the cultivation of historical empathy, the contextualization of documents into broader historical frameworks, and the curiosity and appreciation for the past.

The Guidelines will be submitted for approval by the appropriate standards review committees and executive bodies of SAA and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and ACRL’s Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS). The Task Force will recommend a plan for maintenance and review of the Guidelines at the time the Guidelines are submitted to SAA and ACRL/RBMS for approval.

II. Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The Task Force is charged for a two-year period that begins in September 2015 and continues through the 2017 SAA Annual Meeting. The Task Force may be charged for an additional year if SAA or ACRL standards and executive bodies determine that the standard needs further development before it can be approved. The Task Force will include twelve members, with an equal number of members appointed by SAA and ACRL according to their normal appointment procedures. A Task Force member may be a member of both organizations but will be appointed to the Task Force representing one organization only.  In addition to the committee members, ex officio members and liaisons will be appointed by each organization according to its normal procedures.

Due consideration will be given by each organization to appointing members who have the requisite knowledge and experience in instruction with primary sources and prior experience with standards development.  

One member appointed by each organization will be designated to serve as a Task Force co-chair.  The co-chairs will be responsible for convening Task Force meetings, leading Task Force work, ensuring that deadlines are met, following procedures of their respective organizations, and communicating as needed or required with the standards and executive bodies of their respective organizations. The Task Force will also assemble an (informal) advisory board of experts and representative stakeholders who will review and comment on the Guidelines as they develop. 

III. Reporting Procedures

The Task Force co-chairs will report at least semi-annually to the chairs of the standards committees of their respective organizations.  In conjunction with the chairs of their respective standards committees and in coordination with each other, the co-chairs may also schedule public hearings or conduct public comment periods or both to solicit input on draft versions of the Guidelines.  The public hearings may be conducted in person at the SAA Annual Meeting, the midwinter or annual meetings of the American Library Association, biennial ACRL conferences, and/or annual RBMS pre-conferences. Public hearings may also be conducted virtually.

If the Task Force is granted funding support from its parent or extramural organizations, the co-chairs will provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA and ACRL offices to ensure that reporting requirements of SAA and ACRL and the funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill its purpose as described above, the Task Force is specifically charged to:

  • Develop a definition of primary source literacy and a set of guidelines—standards, performance indicators, and outcomes directed at college and university students. These Guidelines will address primary sources wherever they might be available (e.g., in physical collections, in published volumes, in licensed databases) and will be applicable to a wide range of institutional types that offer instructional services.
  • Consult broadly in developing Guidelines with professional organizations of those who teach and use primary sources, in addition to archives and library organizations.
  • Ensure that the language and scope of the Guidelines are appropriate for those teaching and learning with primary sources.
  • Publicize and conduct public hearings, public comment periods, or both to ensure that members of the archives and library professions have adequate opportunities to become aware of and contribute to the development of the Guidelines.
  • Follow procedures outlined in SAA’s Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard and ACRL’s Procedures for Preparation of New Standards and Guidelines to ensure that the SAA Council, ACRL Standards, and RBMS Executive Committee can approve and adopt the Guidelines in a timely manner.

V. Meetings

The Task Force will carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, conference calls, and online meetings in accordance with the meeting policies of the respective organizations.[1] Face-to-face meetings will also be scheduled during the SAA Annual Meeting (pending space availability) and the midwinter and annual meetings of the American Library Association, which is when ACRL/RBMS business meetings are conducted. Task Force members will be encouraged but not required to attend face-to-face meetings in person; if possible, however, the co-chairs will make arrangements for virtual participation in these meetings via conference call or online meeting software. Co-chairs will be required to attend (in person) the face-to-face meetings held during the regular meetings of their respective organizations and will be strongly encouraged to attend (in person) the face-to-face meetings of the other organization.

Minutes will be prepared for each face-to-face meeting and any conference call or online meeting that meets policy definitions for a meeting, and the minutes will be posted within thirty days to the public websites of the respective organizations.

 

[1] See http://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/appendices/app_a/Group_Support_AM and http://www.ala.org/acrl/resources/policies/chapter8.

 

Adopted by the SAA Council: November 2014
Revised: December 2014 

SAA-ACRL/RBMS Joint Task Force on the Development of Standardized Holdings Counts and Measures for Archival Repositories and Special Collections Libraries (Affiliated Group)

I. Purpose

The SAA-ACRL/RBMS Joint Task Force on the Development of Standardized Holdings Counts and Measures for Archival Repositories and Special Collections Libraries (hereafter "Task Force") is responsible for the development of guidelines (hereafter "Guidelines") that will provide metrics, definitions, and best practices for quantifying the holdings of archival repositories and special collections libraries. The Guidelines will consider and address both the wide range of types and formats of material typically held--including analog, digital, and audiovisual materials--and the different ways in which collection material is managed and described. The Guidelines might also accommodate a two-tiered approach involving basic/minimum metrics and advanced/optimum metrics and/or include recommendations for institutions that wish to engage in collections assessment.

The Guidelines will be submitted to the Society of American Archivists Standards Committee (hereafter "SAA Standards"), the Association of College and Research Libraries Standards Committee (hereafter "ACRL Standards"), and the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section Executive Committee (hereafter "RBMS Exec"). The Task Force will recommend a plan for maintenance and review of the Guidelines when the Guidelines are submitted to SAA and ACRL/RBMS for approval.

II. Task Force Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The Task Force is charged for a two-year period that begins in September 2014 and continues through the 2016 SAA Annual Meeting. The Task Force may be charged for an additional year if SAA or ACRL standards and executive bodies determine that the Standard needs further development before it can be approved. (Per SAA Council interim action in June 2016, the Task Force was granted a one-year extension through August 30, 2017.) The Task Force will include ten members with an equal number of members appointed by SAA and ACRL according to their normal appointment procedures. A Task Force member may be a member of both organizations but will be appointed to the Task Force representing one organization only.  In addition to the committee members, ex officio members and liaisons will be appointed by each organization according to its normal procedures.

SAA and ACRL will consider the following when appointing individuals as members of the Task Force:

  • Experience managing collections in an archival repository or special collections library;
  • Familiarity with the wide range of types and formats of material typically held;
  • Knowledge of or involvement with the standards development process; and
  • Ability to fulfill ex officio and/or liaison roles for SAA or ACRL.

One member appointed by each organization will be designated to serve as a Task Force co-chair. The co-chairs will be responsible for convening Task Force meetings, leading Task Force work, ensuring that deadlines are met, following procedures of their respective organizations, and communicating as needed or required with both organizations.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Task Force co-chairs will report at least semi-annually to the appropriate groups within both organizations. In conjunction with SAA Standards and RBMS Exec and in coordination with each other, the co-chairs may also schedule public hearings or conduct public comment periods or both to solicit input on draft versions of the Guidelines. The public hearings may be conducted at the SAA Annual Meeting, the midwinter or annual meeting of the American Library Association, a biennial ACRL conference, and/or the annual RBMS preconference. Public hearings may also be conducted virtually. If the Task Force is granted funding support from its parent and/or extramural organizations, the co-chairs will ensure that reporting requirements are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill its purpose as described above, the Task Force is specifically charged to:

  • Develop a set of guidelines -- metrics, definitions, and best practices -- for quantifying holdings of archival repositories and special collections libraries, paying particular attention to both the wide range of types and formats of material typically held and the different ways in which collection material is managed and described.
  • Ensure that the language and scope of the Guidelines are appropriate to archival repositories and special collections libraries in the United States, with due consideration given to aligning the Guidelines with terminology, definitions, and measures employed in other relevant national and international standards.
  • Publicize and conduct public hearings, public comment periods, or both to ensure that members of the archives and library professions have adequate opportunities to become aware of and contribute to the development of the Guidelines.
  • Follow procedures outlined in SAA's Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard and ACRL’s Procedures for Preparation of New Standards and Guidelines to ensure that SAA Standards, ACRL Standards, and RBMS Exec can approve and adopt the Guidelines in a timely manner.

V. Meetings

The Task Force will carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, conference calls, and online meetings in accordance with the meeting policies of the respective organizations.  Face-to-face meetings will also be scheduled during the SAA Annual Meeting and the midwinter and annual meetings of the American Library Association, which is when ACRL/RBMS business meetings are conducted.  Task Force members will be encouraged but not required to attend face-to-face meetings in person; if possible, however, the co-chairs will make arrangements for virtual participation in these meetings via conference call or online meeting software. Co-chairs will be required to attend (in person) the face-to-face meetings held during the regular meetings of their respective organizations and will be strongly encouraged to attend (in person) the face-to-face meetings of the other organization.  Minutes will be prepared for each face-to-face meeting and any conference call or online meeting that meets policy definitions for a meeting, and the minutes will be posted within thirty days to the public websites of the respective organizations.

Adopted by the SAA Council: January 2014.
Extension Request Granted: June 2016. 

SAA-ACRL/RBMS Joint Task Force on the Development of Standardized Statistical Measures for Public Services in Archival Repositories and Special Collections Libraries (Affiliated Group)

I. Purpose

The SAA-ACRL/RBMS Joint Task Force on the Development of Standardized Statistical Measures for Public Services in Archival Repositories and Special Collections Libraries (hereafter "Task Force") is responsible for development of a new standard (hereafter 'Standard') defining appropriate statistical measures and performance metrics to govern the collection and analysis of statistical data for describing public services provided by archival repositories and special collections libraries. The Standard will describe and quantify users of special collections and archival materials and services and their usage of the same, including reading room paging/circulation, paging/circulation of materials for other purposes (e.g., class/events, exhibits, reference questions, conservation, processing), reference interactions (in person and via email), reproduction orders (numbers of orders and pages photocopied/digitized), interlibrary loan requests (physical, digital; filled, not filled), and events (e.g., numbers and characteristics of class visits, exhibits [physical and virtual], tours, programs, etc).  If feasible, the Standard may also include recommendations for gathering and analyzing statistics about special collections website visitors and their page views and file downloads.

The elements of the Standard will be developed in such a way as to support measures and analysis of the impact of public services in addition to basic statistical counts. In addition, the Standard will include guidance on the implementation of methods of data collection, analysis, and reporting to ensure appropriate safeguards for the privacy, confidentiality, and security of user records.

To the extent deemed possible and mutually desirable, the Task Force will coordinate the development of the Standard with the International Council on Archives and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Subcommittee on Quality - Statistics and performance evaluation (TC464/SC8) [1].

The Standard will be submitted for approval by the appropriate standards review committees and executive bodies of SAA and the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and ACRL's Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS). The Task Force will recommend a plan for maintenance and review of the Guidelines at the time the Guidelines are submitted to SAA and ACRL/RBMS for approval.

II. Task Force Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The Task Force is charged for two years, beginning September 2014 and continuing through the 2016 SAA Annual Meeting. The Task Force may be charged for an additional year if SAA or ACRL standards and executive bodies determine that the Standard needs further development before it can be approved. (Per SAA Council interim action in June 2016, the Task Force was granted a one-year extension through August 30, 2017.) 

The Task Force will include ten members with an equal number of members appointed by SAA and ACRL according to their normal appointment procedures. A Task Force member may be a member of both organizations but will be appointed to the Task Force to represent only one organization. Due consideration will be given by each organization to appointing members who have requisite knowledge and experience in the management of the public service operations of archival repositories and special collections libraries and prior experience with standards development. Additional consideration should be given to appointing members who are knowledgeable or involved with development of international standards (e.g., the International Council on Archives and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Subcommittee on Quality - Statistics and performance evaluation (TC464/SC8) [2]). In addition to the committee members, ex officio members and liaisons will be appointed by each organization according to its normal procedures.

One member appointed by each organization will be designated to serve as a Task Force co-chair. The co-chairs will be responsible for convening Task Force meetings, leading Task Force work, ensuring that deadlines are met, following procedures of their respective organizations, and communicating as needed or required with the standards and executive bodies of their respective organizations.

III. Reporting Procedures

The Task Force co-chairs will report at least semi-annually to the chairs of the standards committees of their respective organizations. In conjunction with the chairs of their respective standards committees and in coordination with each other, the co-chairs may also schedule public hearings or conduct public comment periods or both to solicit input on draft versions of the Standard.  The public hearings may be conducted in person at the SAA Annual Meeting, the midwinter or annual meetings of the American Library Association, biennial ACRL conferences, or annual RBMS preconferences. Public hearings may also be conducted virtually.

If the Task Force is granted funding support from its parent or extramural organizations, the co-chairs will provide all necessary narrative reports to the SAA and ACRL offices to ensure that reporting requirements of SAA and ACRL and the funding source are met.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

To fulfill its mission as described above, the Task Force is specifically charged to:

  • Develop and define appropriate statistical measures and performance metrics (i.e., the "Standard") to govern the collection and analysis of statistical data for describing public services in archival repositories and special collections libraries as outlined in section I.
  • Ensure that the language and scope of the Standard is appropriate to archival repositories and special collections libraries in the United States, with due consideration given to aligning the Standard with terminology, definitions, and measures employed in other relevant national and international standards.
  • Publicize and conduct public hearings, or public comment periods, or both to ensure that members of the archives and library professions have adequate opportunities to become aware of and contribute to the development of the Standard.
  • Follow all other guidelines outlined in SAA’s Procedures for Review and Approval of an SAA-Developed Standard [3] and ACRL’s Procedures for Preparation of New Standards and Guidelines [4] to ensure that SAA and ACRL standards and executive bodies approve and adopt the Standard in a timely manner.

V. Meetings

The Task Force will carry out its charge primarily via electronic mail, conference calls, and online meetings in accordance with the meeting policies of the respective organizations [5]. Face-to-face meetings will also be scheduled during the SAA Annual Meeting and the midwinter and annual meetings of the American Library Association, which is when ACRL/RBMS business meetings are conducted.  Task Force members will be encouraged but not required to attend face-to-face meetings in person; if possible, however, the co-chairs will make arrangements for virtual participation in these meetings via conference call or online meeting software. Co-chairs will be required to attend (in person) the face-to-face meetings held during the regular meetings of their respective organizations and will be strongly encouraged to attend (in person) the face-to-face meetings of the other organization.

Minutes will be prepared for each face-to-face meeting and any conference call or online meeting that meets policy definitions for a meeting, and the minutes will be posted within thirty days to the public websites of the respective organizations.

[1] ISO TC464/SC8 is “currently assessing the forthcoming revision to the ISO standard on International library statistics (ISO 2789) for areas where the standards can be better aligned and for proposed new statistics and methods”; see: http://www.niso.org/news/pr/view?item_key=4bab6c0503ed5d9f392f862e9d32ce346eef6c69.

[2] ISO TC464/SC8 is “currently assessing the forthcoming revision to the ISO standard on International library statistics (ISO 2789) for areas where the standards can be better aligned and for proposed new statistics and methods”; see: http://www.niso.org/news/pr/view?item_key=4bab6c0503ed5d9f392f862e9d32ce346eef6c69.

[3] See http://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section7/groups/Standards/Procedures-Review-Approval-SAA-Developed-Standard.

[4]See http://www.ala.org/acrl/resources/policies/chapter14#14.5.

[5] See http://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/appendices/app_a/Group_Support_AM and http://www.ala.org/acrl/resources/policies/chapter8.

Adopted by the SAA Council: January 2014.
Extension Request Granted: June 2016. 

Section IX: Sections

Frequently Asked Questions

A. Mission Statement

  1. Serve as advocate for interest around which the section is formed.
    1. Sections focus attention on and give voice to the concerns that form the section’s particular areas of interest.
    2. Sections focus expertise and interest in the professional functions and responsibilities to carry out the archival profession’s mission to identify, administer, and promote the use of records of enduring value.
  2. Encourage and provide communication.
    1. Sections provide a forum for members to discuss matters of interest within the Society.
    2. Sections provide channels of communication from the section to the membership of the Society and to the Council on matters of concern to the section.
  3. Perform work.
    1. Sections are responsible for advancing the work of the profession within their field of practice.
    2. Sections provide mechanisms for members to initiate activities of common interest.
    3. Sections review material referred to them by the Council for comment or action.
    4. Sections can formulate specific projects, for which task forces would be created to execute the projects.
    5. Sections give an institutionalized opportunity for members to focus on a longer term basis and in a national forum on specific matters of practical interest.
  4. Integrate new members.
    Sections provide a vital mechanism for new members to become active in the work of the Society and the group, and to meet members with common interests.
    1. Membership in sections requires the individual to be a member of the Society.
    2. Society members are limited to two Section memberships and must formally sign up with the SAA office for section membership.
    3. The SAA office maintains the official lists of section members.
  5. Develop leadership
    The sections, as well as their various subgroups (if any), offer opportunities to their members to take leadership in working with and for their colleagues. Through the years a considerable number of the elected and appointed positions within SAA have been filled by persons who began their leadership role within sections.

B. Goals and Areas of Activity

  1. Each section will adopt and maintain a statement of goals and objectives indicating the general concerns and intended areas of work of the section. Section goals should be clearly articulated with reference to implementation strategies and activities. Sections should be specific about their objectives and activities and periodically examine their mission and goal statements for currency. The statement of goals and objectives may be changed as the section sees fit; information on any changes should be included in the annual report submitted to the Council. Sections should make explicit reference to their annual goals in their annual reports.
  2. As governing units of the Society, sections are expected to contribute to the professional discourse and advance the Society’s priorities as identified by the Council. Sections have an obligation to respond to requests or tasks assigned to them by the Council.
  3. Sections are charged to be active in four areas:
    1. They identify and consider issues in which a significant number of members have an interest. Members may investigate different facets of the issues, then report and discuss their findings during section meetings and through section communications.
    2. They recommend to the Council – through reports, action items, or discussion items submitted on the Council Report Template – or positions the section believes appropriate for SAA. The Council remains the policy-setting body for SAA, and only it can promulgate a formal position for SAA or any of its constituent bodies.
    3. They suggest program sessions for the SAA Annual Meeting and, with the advice of the executive director, plan section functions for the SAA Annual Meeting (e.g., the Finding Aids Fair of the Description Section).
    4. They communicate their activities to the Society at large by publishing information about their work on their websites and on SAA’s main website.

C. Recognition and Standing

  1. The Council will establish SAA sections for groups organized to advance professional practice within broad areas of common archival interest and affiliation, such as institutional settings, archival functional categories, record formats, or programmatic activities. The Council will consider the merits of each application in light of existing SAA groups and the accompanying statement of intent and goals.
  2. New applications for recognition as a section must be submitted no later than the posted deadline each year for submitting agenda items for the winter Council meeting, so that Council action can occur before the next Annual Meeting.
  3. Application by petition will include signatures, in paper or electronic form, of at least 300 members of SAA, a publishable statement of purpose and goals of the Section, and a statement about why a separate section would be advantageous to the Society.
  4. Sections that do not maintain an official membership level of at least 300 members for two consecutive years may be dissolved after due notice and an opportunity for section officers to appeal. The Council will offer to designate such groups as roundtables without re-application.
  5. Should a section decide that the more informal status of roundtable would better suit its ends, it may petition the Council for a change in status.

D. Membership, Meetings, and Other Privileges

  1. SAA members are eligible for membership in any two sections. The SAA office maintains the official list of section members.
  2. Each section is guaranteed space and support at the SAA Annual Meeting for a two-hour annual membership meeting. A portion of this time may be used for meetings of constituent groups, as deemed appropriate by the section. Sections will be supplied with basic equipment to support their membership meetings.
  3. Sections will receive priority support from the Society’s budget for special projects approved by the Council. Sections will also receive electronic communication support in the form of website hosting and electronic lists.

E. Governance

  1. Internal leadership
    1. Every section will have a chair, a vice-chair/chair-elect, and a minimum of two steering committee members chosen by election.
    2. Section officers and steering committee members must be SAA members in good standing.
    3. Sections may elect or appoint additional officers and members to the steering committee. Sections are encouraged to retain continuity and recruit leadership by designating other positions of responsibility (eg, web coordinators, committee chairs, etc), to carry out the program and work of the section.
    4. The chair and vice-chair/chair-elect serve consecutively. The vice-chair/chair-elect succeeds the chair at the conclusion of the Annual Meeting that coincides with the term of office. All officers and committee members begin their terms at the close of the SAA Annual Meeting.
    5. The term of office and the number of consecutive terms that a person may serve in one section office or on the steering committee will be set in the section’s bylaws.
    6. To ensure their alignment with SAA’s governance documents, bylaws and subsequent changes should be reviewed by the executive director or her/his designee before the section membership votes to adopt them. Once adopted, new or revised bylaws must be submitted for approval by the Council to ensure that they become part of the permanent record as a component of Council meeting minutes.
    7. Sections are encouraged to create special or standing subcommittees in order to execute the goals of the section, develop leaders, and recruit members into the Society.
  2. Section elections
    1. Sections will conduct annual elections via an online ballot system provided by the SAA staff. Members must vote via the online ballot.
    2. Formal calls for nominations will be issued by the section leadership and collected by June 1.
    3. Basic ballot information (e.g., introductory message to voters, listing of offices, number of vacancies for each, names of candidates, and links to candidate statements) will be submitted to the SAA staff by June 15.
    4. Supplementary ballot information (e.g., candidate photos, biographies, and statements), if desired, will be posted by the section leaders to the section website by July 1.
    5. Online ballots containing basic ballot information will be prepared by staff and made accessible during the first week of July and will remain open for at least two weeks.
    6. Section members who are in good standing on June 30 are eligible to vote. Members who join after this date will be eligible to vote during the following year.
    7. Ballot results will be reported by staff to the section leaders in order to be announced at the Annual Meeting.
  3. Consultation
    1. Sections are incubators for developing leaders who go on to take leadership positions within SAA at other levels of responsibility. Leadership development is a more productive process in an organizational environment that nurtures consultation and participation.
    2. Section leaders are to be appropriately consulted in the decision-making and deliberative processes of the Society. Whenever possible, section leaders should be included in appointments to committees and task forces, when such appointments are appropriate to inform the subject or achieve a diversity of opinion.

F. Annual Reporting Requirements

  1. Leadership Report: The chair of each section will convey to the executive director or designee an electronic list of the names of section officers and steering committee members within 14 days of the close of the Annual Meeting. The chair will include in that list all individuals who should be subscribed to the official SAA leadership list.
  2. Section Annual Report: Each section, like all SAA groups, is required to present an annual report for review by the Council. Section annual reports must be filed with the SAA executive director within 90 days of the close of the  Annual Meeting. (Download the Section and Roundtable Annual Report Template.) The annual report should be a brief summary that includes the following:
    1. An accurate list of section leaders and contact information.
    2. A verified count of Annual Meeting attendees.
    3. A summary of work accomplished.
    4. A summary of any activities relating to SAA's strategic plan.
    5. Goals and plans for the coming year.
    6. Other pertinent information on section activities.
  3. Section annual reports will be posted on the section's website.
  4. The section may be placed on probationary status or lose Section privileges if it fails to complete and file an annual report within six months of an Annual Meeting. Failure to file an annual report within one year of the close of the Annual Meeting will result in a notice from the president of the section’s dissolution. Sections receiving such notice may file an appeal with the Council.

G. Consultation with the Council

  1. The SAA president will extend an invitation to section leaders to attend the annual Leadership Orientation and Forum. Attendance for section leaders is strongly encouraged.
  2. The Council is responsible for addressing section matters, making recommendations about section matters, and communicating actions concerning sections to the leaders. Each section is assigned a Council liaison, who is the primary contact for section leaders with the Council. Any concerns that section leaders have with their assigned Council liaison should be discussed with the executive director or the SAA president.

H. Communications

  1. Sections will provide to the SAA staff key leadership information for display on the main SAA website. This information will be reviewed annually by the section steering committee and used to orient officers and steering committee members. The information should include, at a minimum, up-to-date versions of the following:
    1. A statement of purpose and current goals.
    2. The section bylaws.
    3. Specific duties of the officers, including their reporting requirements.
    4. Information on officers and activities from the section's annual reports.
  2. Section websites, e-mail discussion lists, document workspaces, and online social networks will conform to the Uniform Guidelines for SAA Websites and Online Communications
  3. The SAA office will contact section chairs, in time for publication in the Annual Meeting program, to request information on plans for the section meeting at the Annual Meeting.

I. Funding for Section Activities

  1. Sections will receive priority support from the Society’s budget for special projects approved in advance by the Council.
  2. SAA’s fiscal year extends from July 1 to June 30. Budget requests from sections will be submitted to the executive director via the SAA Component Group Funding Request Form no later than March 1.
  3. Funds allocated to a section during one fiscal year are not carried over to the next fiscal year. If an allocation must be deferred to the next year, the section must formally request funding for that year in a new SAA Component Group Funding Request Form.
  4. A Section must receive authorization from the Council to spend any monies or commit any monies to be spent. Although exceptions can be made, the Council expects to appropriate monies for section activities through the regular budget process.
  5. If a section wishes to seek resources (in cash or in kind) from any source outside of SAA, Executive Committee approval must be obtained in every instance before approaching the source. Proposals should be routed through the section's Council liaison with sufficient time for consideration by the Executive Committee, which will respond within 30 days.

J. Use of SAA Name, Logo, and Auspices

  1. The use of SAA’s name, logo, and auspices for publications, meetings, mailings, websites, social networks, electronic communications, and other activities is available only through specific provision of the Council and will conform to the Uniform Guidelines for Use of the SAA Logo.
  2. Although sections are within the SAA structure, they are not empowered to take action in the name of SAA, or request money in the name of SAA or the section itself without specific prior authorization from the Council. This firm rule is required to protect SAA and its members from potential legal complications.

Approved by the SAA Council: September 1989
Revised: January 1991, February 1992, January 1993, March 2007, July 2008, February 2010, March 2011, June 2012, January 2013, July 2013, January 2014.

List of SAA Sections

Acquisitions and Appraisal Section
The Section provides a forum for discussion of issues and interests pertaining to the acquisition and appraisal of public records, private papers, and other archival or manuscript collections.

Architectural Records Section
Provides a forum for members to discuss issues related to access and management of architectural records and related fields.

Archival Educators Section
Facilitates exchange of information about archival education programs throughout the United States and Canada and provides a forum for discussion of issues relevant to those who teach courses and workshops in archival administration and related topics, in both academic institutions and other settings.

Archival History Section
Stimulates interest among archivists in the profession's own past and suggests ways of studying its history.

Archives Management Section
Addresses the identification and consideration of management and leadership issues that are important to archivists and archival institutions and brings together archivists from dissimilar institutions who share these interests.

Archivists & Archives of Color Section
Provides a forum to identify and discuss concerns faced by racial minorities; encourages exchange of ideas by archivists with diverse racial backgrounds; promotes wider participation of minorities within the archival profession; ensures the preservation of archival materials pertaining to minorities; supports development of archival services and programs to minorities; and seeks funding for scholarships for minority students in library/information science master’s degree programs.

Archivists of Religious Collections Section
The Section represents a network of professional archivists who work for national, international, and local church organizations, religious societies and orders, and theological schools. Section members are engaged in documenting the many sides of the private and public experience of faith as it is lived out through the institutional church, religious movements, and individual experience. See also the ARCS legacy website.

Business Archives Section
The Section brings together archivists who administer non-current records of corporations and businesses from an historical and archival standpoint. This section also produces a Directory of Corporate Archives.

Collection Managment Tools Section
Provides a forum for archivists from all types of repositories to identify and discuss key issues relevant to the implementation, support, comparison, analyses, and integration of collection management tools and systems.

College and University Archives Section
The Section provides a forum for archivists who are concerned with the administration, organization, and care of records of institutions of higher education. Guidelines for College and University Archives are also available here.

Congressional Papers Section
Provides a means for discussion of archival issues involved in the acquisition, processing, and administration of the papers of members of the United States Congress.

Description Section
The Section provides a forum for persons involved in the development of appropriate means to organize and describe manuscripts and archives. Information and documentation on descriptive standards can be found here.

Electronic Records Section
The Section functions as a locus of expertise, leadership, and information sharing for SAA regarding management and preservation of records in electronic form.

Encoded Archival Standards (EAS) Section
Promotes the implementation and use of encoding standards for dissemination of archival information. To this end, the Section aims to provide tools and information for use in encoding archival descriptions; promotes discussion and facilitates the use of software for markup, parsing, indexing, and delivery; and monitors and contributes to encoding standard development for archival description.

Government Records Section
The Section provides a forum for archivists who are concerned with the administration, organization, and care of records of government.

Human Rights Archives Section
Aims to create a space for SAA members and other stakeholders (human rights advocates, scholars, government officials, and non-governmental organization workers) to increase dialogue and collaboration on issues related to the collection, preservation, disclosure, legal implications, and ethics of human rights documentation.

International Archival Affairs Section
Identifies and addresses issues and concerns of archives and archivists throughout the world, and provides a forum for discussion, dissemination, and promotion of issues related to international archival affairs.

Issues & Advocacy Section
Dedicated to finding news of, and formulating for the SAA Council's consideration, possible responses to archives- and records-related issues and events.

Labor Archives Section
Promotes communication among archivists and institutions concerned with records in the field of labor and develops cooperative strategies and guidelines to ensure comprehensive documentation of the labor movement. Maintains a Directory of Labor Archives in the United States and Canada.

Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives Section (LACCHA)
Serves as a forum for discussion and advice on issues relating to the management and preservation of archival and cultural heritage materials housed in U.S. repositories and originating from the Latin American and Caribbean area or created in the United States by Latin American and Caribbean diaspora or special-interest groups.

Lesbian and Gay Archives Section (LAGAS)
Provides a forum for archivists who are concerned with ensuring that the archival record includes documentation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history and culture; ensures that LGBT archival issues are identified and visible within SAA; and serves as a liaison between independent LGBT archives and SAA.

Local Government Records Section
Provides a forum for dialogue among archivists who are concerned with the administration, organization, and care of records of local government.

Lone Arrangers Section
Provides education, stimulates communication, and encourages support among archivists working in "lone arranger" settings. The term "lone arranger" includes those working alone or in very small staff situations.

Manuscript Repositories Section
The Section serves as a forum for the discussion of issues and interests pertaining to the acquisition and administration of manuscripts created outside the collecting institution.

Metadata and Digital Object Section
Promotes discussion, education, and collaboration among archivists who are interested in digitization, digital archival objects, and the metadata that enables access, management, and preservation of digital objects.

Military Archives Section
Provides a forum to facilitate collaboration and information sharing among archival institutions, universities, governments, legal bodies, and nongovernment agencies that are documenting and preserving records of issues related to the military and military service.

Museum Archives Section
The Section provides a forum for museum archivists, who are responsible for the organization and care of archival materials held and/or created by their institution. A museum's records document the history and development of the museum, its collections, exhibitions, and programs as well as the contributions of individuals and groups associated with the museum. The Museum Archives Section newsletters are available online on the Museum Archives section Group Web Page and here via the Canadian Heritage Information Network website.

Native American Archives Section
Serves as a forum to educate archivists on the complexities and beauty of Native American archives of the western hemisphere and as a source of communication and inspiration for archivists working with Native American collections.

Oral History Section
The Section brings together persons who are interested in the administration and use of oral history interviews in the archival setting, including those who conduct oral history interviews and those who teach oral history methodology.

Performing Arts Section
Encourages the exchange of information on historical and contemporary documentation of music, dance, theater, and other performance media.

Preservation Section
The Section provides a forum for professionals with a special interest in the problems presented by the deterioration, preservation, and restoration of archival materials in all formats.

Privacy and Confidentiality Section
Provides a forum for discussion of privacy and confidentiality issues and their legal and ethical implications for archival practice.

Public Library Archives / Special Collections Section
Encourages advocacy for and education about archival, manuscript, local history, genealogy, and other historic and special collections within public libraries of all sizes; provides an arena for discussion and dissemination of best practices of the archives, library, museum, and history fields; and works to support the informational, historical, and cultural interests that converge in public library archives and special collections.

Recorded Sound Section
Serves as a forum for discussing the role, needs, and care of sound recordings in archival collections.

Records Management Section
Encourages discussion of current issues in records and information management and promotes better understanding of the importance of collaborative efforts between archivists and records managers.

Reference, Access and Outreach Section
The Section provides a forum for archivists who work with the users of archives, particularly those with reference responsibilities and those who integrate archival and manuscript materials into exhibits and other public programs.

Research Libraries Section
Promotes discussion and collaboration on initiatives and research projects that affect archivists working in a research library context.

Science, Technology, and Health Care Section
Provides a forum for archivists with interests or holdings in science, technology, and health care, presenting opportunities to exchange information, solve problems, and share successes.

Security Section
Focuses on issues relating to the prevention of theft in archival and manuscript repositories.

Students and New Archives Professionals Section (SNAP)
Focuses attention on and gives voice to the needs and concerns of its members--in particular, students, interns, new professionals, early-career archivists, and individuals seeking professional employment--within SAA and the field in general.

Visual Materials Section
The Section brings together archivists who administer (collect, arrange, preserve, describe, and interpret) still photographs, moving images, art, and graphic materials.

Visual Materials Cataloging and Access Section
Provides a forum for archivists with visual collections to discuss cataloging and access issues.

Web Archiving Section
Works to heighten advocacy and awareness of the issues that archivists encounter related to the selection, appraisal, harvesting, management, and preservation of web resources.

Women Archivists Section
Monitors the status of women in the archival profession, and promotes the participation of women in all phases of SAA's activities and the profession as a whole.

Women’s Collections Section
Promotes the preservation and research use of records documenting women and networks archivists with holdings concerning or created by women.

Section X: Roundtables

Frequently Asked Questions

A. Mission Statement

  1. Serve as advocate for interest around which the roundtable is formed.
    1. Roundtables focus attention on and give voice to the concerns that form the roundtable’s particular areas of interest.
    2. Roundtables function as communities of interest engaged in generating ideas and meeting the intellectual interests of the membership in areas of topical interest. They focus expertise and interest in the professional functions and responsibilities to carry out the archival profession’s mission to identify, administer, and promote the use of records of enduring value.
  2. Encourage and provide communication.
    1. Roundtables provide a forum for members to discuss matters of interest within the body. They also provide channels of communication from the roundtable to the membership of the Society and to the Council on matters of concern to the roundtable.
    2. As roundtables may exist as online communities, communication may take place in the form of roundtable electronic discussion groups.
  3. Perform work.
    1. Roundtables provide mechanisms for members to initiate activities of common interest. Roundtables can formulate specific projects, for which task forces may be created to execute the projects.
    2. Roundtables review material referred to the by the Council for comment or action.
    3. Roundtables give and institutionalize opportunity for members to focus, on a longer term basis and in a national forum, on specific matters of practical interest.
  4. Integrate new members.
    1. Roundtables provide a vital mechanism for new and prospective SAA members to become active in the work of the Society and the group, and for meeting members with common interests. Roundtables provide new members a chance to participate and to contribute to the work of the group and the Society.
    2. Although it is expected that the core of a roundtable is composed of Individual members of SAA, anyone may participate in a roundtable by joining in its electronic communications list and engaging in discussions of and work on issues of interest to its membership. Because of this, roundtables play a unique and significant role in recruiting new members to the Society.
    3. As part of their annual report, roundtables that are provided in-person meeting space at the annual meeting are required to include records of attendance. Failure to do so could jeopardize future requests for in-person meeting space. Other roundtables are encouraged to provide annual data on participation as an indicator of overall effectiveness in meeting the needs of roundtable members.
  5. Develop leadership.
    The roundtables offer opportunities to their members to take leadership in working with and for their colleagues. Through the years, a considerable number of the elected and appointed positions within SAA have been filled by persons who began their leadership roles in roundtables.

B. Goals and Areas of Activity

  1. Each roundtable will adopt and maintain a statement of goals and objectives indicating the general concerns and intended areas of work of the roundtable.
  2. Roundtables are charged to be active in four areas:
    1. They identify and consider issues in which a significant number of members have an interest. Members may investigate different facets of the issues, then report and discuss their findings during roundtable meetings and through roundtable mailings or electronic communications.
    2. They recommend to the Council, through reports, action items, or discussion items — submitted on the Council Report Template — an action or a position that the roundtable believes appropriate for SAA. The Council remains the policy-setting body for SAA, and only it can promulgate a formal position for SAA or any of its constituent bodies.
    3. They suggest program sessions for the SAA Annual Meeting, and request space for and, if allocated, plan Roundtable meetings for the SAA Annual Meeting.
    4. They communicate roundtable activity within the roundtable and to the Society at large.

C. Recognition and Standing

  1. The Council may establish roundtables upon submission of a group’s application. The Council will consider the merits of each request in light of existing SAA groups and the specific statement of intent and goals of the applicant group.
  2. New applications for recognition as a roundtable must be submitted no later than the posted deadline each year for submitting agenda items for the winter Council meeting, so that Council action can occur before the next Annual Meeting.
  3. Application is made by petition to include signatures, in paper or electronic form, of at least 50 SAA members, a publishable statement of purpose and goals of the roundtable, and a statement indicating why a separate roundtable would be advantageous to the Society.
  4. Roundtables that do not maintain an official membership level of at least 25 SAA members and meet annual reporting requirements may be dissolved as an official SAA roundtable after due notice and an opportunity for roundtable officers to appeal.
  5. Should a roundtable decide that a more formal structure and greater degree of activity are necessary to carry forward its work, it may petition the Council to become a section. Such petitions should indicate a plan of work for specific projects that can be carried out more effectively through the section structure.

D. Membership and Meetings

  1. Membership
    1. SAA members may join an unlimited number of roundtables. The SAA office will maintain and report on the official list of roundtable members as an aid in allocating resources and tracking member services.
    2. Nonmembers of SAA may participate in a roundtable by joining in its electronic communications list and engaging in discussions of and work on issues of interest to its membership.
  2. Meetings
    1. Roundtables are encouraged to work creatively and collaboratively with each other and with other SAA component groups to plan and conduct programs at the Annual Meeting. The Society makes every effort to provide appropriate meeting space for roundtables in the conference hotel, but roundtables may be required to meet certain conditions to secure dedicated rooms and other resources, especially equipment, that may be available during the Annual Meeting.
    2. Roundtable leaders will receive an annual notice from the SAA office detailing the process for requesting meeting space and audiovisual support for roundtables at the Annual Meeting, with deadlines for responding. Roundtables may be allocated shared meeting space at the Annual Meeting, depending on the number of requests received. The following criteria, among others, may be used to determine the allocation of meeting room  space and audiovisual support for roundtables:
      • The SAA office receives a request for space by the deadline established by the executive director.   
      • All annual reporting requirements for the previous year have been met, including the leader’s acknowledgment of leadership responsibilities.
      • The roundtable has organized a special presentation or program that advances the Society’s strategic plan.
      • The roundtable is engaged in a collaborative exercise with another roundtable or section.
      • The historical and expected attendance are large enough to warrant dedicated space in order to accommodate members.

       

    3. Following the process outlined above (X.D.2.b), roundtable requests for a dedicated meeting room and/or equipment at an SAA Annual Meeting are evaluated by the executive director, based on budgetary appropriations and in consultation with the Council liaison and Executive Committee, as appropriate.
    4. New roundtables are eligible for a dedicated meeting room at the SAA Annual Meeting for their first organizational meeting after approval by the Council.
    5. Roundtables that are allocated dedicated meeting space at one Annual Meeting will not receive priority over other roundtables requesting dedicated space at the next Annual Meeting.
    6. Roundtables that do not meet at one Annual Meeting but that wish to reserve space at a subsequent meeting may request allocation of space without penalty.

E. Governance

  1. Roundtables will adopt and report to the Council a governance structure that is consistent with their need. At minimum there must be one elected leader, and roundtable leaders will be elected annually. No person may serve as the senior leader of a roundtable for more than three successive years. Only SAA members are eligible to serve as or vote for roundtable leadership. Roundtables may conduct their annual leadership elections online. If a roundtable chooses to do so, it must comply with the criteria and rules for section elections.
  2. Roundtable leaders are required to notify the SAA office of newly elected leaders within 14 days of the close of the Annual Meeting so that the official SAA leadership list can be updated and mailings can be circulated effectively.
  3. Elected roundtable leaders will take office at the close of the SAA Annual Meeting.
  4. Roundtables may operate as formally or informally as suits their needs. At minimum, however, they must adopt bylaws. (Roundtables approved by the Council after January 2012 must adopt bylaws within a year of their first official meeting. Roundtables approved by the Council prior to January 2012 must adopt bylaws by August 31, 2013.) To assist in the process of developing bylaws, SAA has prepared a Roundtable Bylaws Template. To ensure their alignment with SAA’s governance documents, bylaws and subsequent changes should be reviewed by the executive director or her/his designee before the roundtable membership votes to adopt them. Once adopted, new or revised bylaws must be submitted for approval by the Council to ensure that they become part of the permanent record as a component of Council meeting minutes.

F. Annual Reporting Requirements

  1. Leadership Report: The chair of each roundtable will convey to the executive director or designee an electronic list of the names of roundtable leaders within 14 days of the close of the Annual Meeting. The chair will include in that list all individuals who should be subscribed to the official SAA leadership list.
  2. Roundtable Annual Report: Roundtable leaders are required to complete and file with the executive director an annual report within 90 days of the close of the Annual Meeting, regardless of whether the roundtable convenes in conjunction with the Annual Meeting. The Section and Roundtable Annual Report Template must be used for annual reports, which briefly summarize the following:
    1. An accurate list of roundtable leaders and contact information.
    2. A verified count of Annual Meeting attendees (if the roundtable met in person at the annual meeting in the year of the annual report being filed).
    3. A summary of work accomplished.
    4. A summary of any activities relating to SAA's strategic plan.
    5. Goals and plans for the coming year.
    6. Other pertinent information on roundtable activities.
  3. Failure to complete and file an annual report within six months of an Annual Meeting places the roundtable in a probationary status and may result in a loss of roundtable privileges. Failure to file an annual report within one year of the close of the Annual Meeting will result in a notice from the SAA president of the roundtable’s dissolution. Roundtables receiving such notice may file an appeal with the Council.
  4. Roundtable annual reports, including the update of purpose and activity statements, will be published on the roundtable's website.

G. Consultation with the Council

  1. The SAA president will extend an invitation to roundtable leaders to attend the annual Leadership Orientation and Forum. Attendance for roundtable leaders is strongly encouraged.
  2. The Council is responsible for addressing roundtable matters, making recommendations about roundtable matters, and communicating actions concerning roundtables to the leaders. Each roundtable is assigned a Council liaison, who is the primary contact for roundtable leaders with the Council. Any concerns that roundtable leaders have with their assigned Council liaison should be discussed with the executive director or the SAA president.

H. Communications

  1. Roundtable leaders will provide to the SAA staff, and update as necessary, broad information on the goals, leadership, and activities of the roundtable for display on the main SAA website. This information should be reviewed annually and used to orient incoming roundtable leaders.
  2. Roundtable websites, e-mail discussion lists, document workspaces, and online social networks will conform to Uniform Guidelines for SAA Websites and Online Communications.
  3. The SAA office will contact roundtable leaders, in time for publication in the Annual Meeting program, to request information on plans for the roundtable meeting at the Annual Meeting.

I. Funding for Roundtable Activities

  1. SAA’s fiscal year extends from July 1 to June 30. Budget requests from roundtables will be submitted to the executive director via the SAA Component Group Funding Request Form no later than March 1. 
  2. Funds allocated to a roundtable during one fiscal year are not carried over to the next fiscal year. If an allocation must be deferred to the next fiscal year, the roundtable must formally request the funding in a new SAA Component Group Funding Request Form.
  3. Otherwise, in pursuing its work, a roundtable (with the exception of its limited appropriation) is not authorized to spend any monies or commit any monies to be spent without specific authorization from the Council. Although exceptions can be made, the Council expects to appropriate money for activities of roundtables through the regular budget process.
  4. If a roundtable wishes to seek resources (whether in cash or in kind) from any source outside SAA, Executive Committee approval must be obtained in every instance before approaching the source. Proposals should be routed through the roundtable's Council liaison, with sufficient time for consideration by the Executive Committee, which will respond within 30 days.

J. Use of SAA Name, Logo, and Auspices

  1. The use of SAA’s name, logo, and auspices for publications, meetings, mailings, websites, social networks, electronic communications, and other activities is available only through specific provision of the Council and will conform to Uniform Guidelines for Use of the SAA Logo.
  2. Roundtables, although they are within the SAA structure, are not empowered to take action in the name of SAA, or request money in the name of SAA or the roundtable itself, without specific prior authorization of the Council. This firm rule is required to protect SAA and its members from potential legal complications.

 

Revised:  March 2007, February 2009, June 2009, August 2009, February 2010, June 2012, January 2013, July 2013, January 2014.

List of SAA Roundtables

Architectural Records Roundtable
Provides a forum for members to discuss issues related to access and management of architectural records and related fields.

Archival Educators Roundtable
Facilitates exchange of information about archival education programs throughout the United States and Canada and provides a forum for discussion of issues relevant to those who teach courses and workshops in archival administration and related topics, in both academic institutions and other settings.

Archival History Roundtable
Stimulates interest among archivists in the profession's own past and suggests ways of studying its history.

Archives Management Roundtable
Addresses the identification and consideration of management and leadership issues that are important to archivists and archival institutions and brings together archivists from dissimilar institutions who share these interests.

Archivists & Archives of Color Roundtable
Provides a forum to identify and discuss concerns faced by racial minorities; encourages exchange of ideas by archivists with diverse racial backgrounds; promotes wider participation of minorities within the archival profession; ensures the preservation of archival materials pertaining to minorities; supports development of archival services and programs to minorities; and seeks funding for scholarships for minority students in library/information science master’s degree programs.

Collection Managment Tools Roundtable
Provides a forum for archivists from all types of repositories to identify and discuss key issues relevant to the implementation, support, comparison, analyses, and integration of collection management tools and systems.

Congressional Papers Roundtable
Provides a means for discussion of archival issues involved in the acquisition, processing, and administration of the papers of members of the United States Congress.

Encoded Archival Description (EAD) Roundtable
Promotes the implementation and use of encoding standards for dissemination of archival information. To this end, the Roundtable aims to provide tools and information for use in encoding archival descriptions; promotes discussion and facilitates the use of software for markup, parsing, indexing, and delivery; and monitors and contributes to encoding standard development for archival description.

Human Rights Archives Roundtable
Aims to create a space for SAA members and other stakeholders (human rights advocates, scholars, government officials, and non-governmental organization workers) to increase dialogue and collaboration on issues related to the collection, preservation, disclosure, legal implications, and ethics of human rights documentation.

International Archival Affairs Roundtable
Identifies and addresses issues and concerns of archives and archivists throughout the world, and provides a forum for discussion, dissemination, and promotion of issues related to international archival affairs.

Issues & Advocacy Roundtable
Dedicated to finding news of, and formulating for the SAA Council's consideration, possible responses to archives- and records-related issues and events.

Labor Archives Roundtable
Promotes communication among archivists and institutions concerned with records in the field of labor and develops cooperative strategies and guidelines to ensure comprehensive documentation of the labor movement. Maintains a Directory of Labor Archives in the United States and Canada.

Latin American and Caribbean Cultural Heritage Archives Roundtable (LACCHA)
Serves as a forum for discussion and advice on issues relating to the management and preservation of archival and cultural heritage materials housed in U.S. repositories and originating from the Latin American and Caribbean area or created in the United States by Latin American and Caribbean diaspora or special-interest groups.

Lesbian and Gay Archives Roundtable (LAGAR)
Provides a forum for archivists who are concerned with ensuring that the archival record includes documentation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history and culture; ensures that LGBT archival issues are identified and visible within SAA; and serves as a liaison between independent LGBT archives and SAA.

Local Government Records Roundtable
Provides a forum for dialogue among archivists who are concerned with the administration, organization, and care of records of local government.

Lone Arrangers Roundtable
Provides education, stimulates communication, and encourages support among archivists working in "lone arranger" settings. The term "lone arranger" includes those working alone or in very small staff situations.

Metadata and Digital Object Roundtable
Promotes discussion, education, and collaboration among archivists who are interested in digitization, digital archival objects, and the metadata that enables access, management, and preservation of digital objects.

Military Archives Roundtable
Provides a forum to facilitate collaboration and information sharing among archival institutions, universities, governments, legal bodies, and nongovernment agencies that are documenting and preserving records of issues related to the military and military service.

Native American Archives Roundtable
Serves as a forum to educate archivists on the complexities and beauty of Native American archives of the western hemisphere and as a source of communication and inspiration for archivists working with Native American collections.

Performing Arts Roundtable
Encourages the exchange of information on historical and contemporary documentation of music, dance, theater, and other performance media.

Privacy and Confidentiality Roundtable
Provides a forum for discussion of privacy and confidentiality issues and their legal and ethical implications for archival practice.

Public Library Archives / Special Collections Roundtable
Encourages advocacy for and education about archival, manuscript, local history, genealogy, and other historic and special collections within public libraries of all sizes; provides an arena for discussion and dissemination of best practices of the archives, library, museum, and history fields; and works to support the informational, historical, and cultural interests that converge in public library archives and special collections.

Recorded Sound Roundtable
Serves as a forum for discussing the role, needs, and care of sound recordings in archival collections.

Records Management Roundtable
Encourages discussion of current issues in records and information management and promotes better understanding of the importance of collaborative efforts between archivists and records managers.

Research Libraries Roundtable
Promotes discussion and collaboration on initiatives and research projects that affect archivists working in a research library context.

Science, Technology, and Health Care Roundtable
Provides a forum for archivists with interests or holdings in science, technology, and health care, presenting opportunities to exchange information, solve problems, and share successes.

Security Roundtable
Focuses on issues relating to the prevention of theft in archival and manuscript repositories.

Students and New Archives Professionals Roundtable (SNAP)
Focuses attention on and gives voice to the needs and concerns of its members--in particular, students, interns, new professionals, early-career archivists, and individuals seeking professional employment--within SAA and the field in general.

Visual Materials Cataloging and Access Roundtable
Provides a forum for archivists with visual collections to discuss cataloging and access issues.

Web Archiving Roundtable
Works to heighten advocacy and awareness of the issues that archivists encounter related to the selection, appraisal, harvesting, management, and preservation of web resources.

Women Archivists Roundtable
Monitors the status of women in the archival profession, and promotes the participation of women in all phases of SAA's activities and the profession as a whole.

Women’s Collections Roundtable
Promotes the preservation and research use of records documenting women and networks archivists with holdings concerning or created by women.

Section XI: Official Representatives to External Groups

List of Official Representatives to External Groups

A. Purpose and Criteria for Representation

  1. As part of the effort to serve its members, the archival profession, and users and creators of archival records, the Society of American Archivists maintains formal communications with a wide variety of groups engaged in archival, library, curatorial, research, and other educational work. These formal ties play a critical role in enabling SAA to generate action, to determine policy and standards, to provide information and counsel on archival matters to related groups, and to keep abreast of developments in fields relevant to the archival community.
  2. The following criteria provide the rationale for SAA’s appointment of a formal representative to an external group:
    1. The external group’s mission must relate to SAA’s mission as stated in SAA’s governance, policy, and/or planning documents.
    2. The external group must be a government agency or a nonprofit organization.
    3. Representation on the group is not funded, unless specifically indicated in the Council-approved charge.
  3. The process for requesting a representative to an external group comprises the following:
    1. A formal request for representation must be made from either the external group or an SAA body. The request should use the Council Report Template and must include the following information formulated as a charge for the representative:
      • External group name.
      • External group mission.
      • Number of representatives and length of terms.
      • Duties of representatives,
      • Specific areas of expertise that representative(s) should have.
      • Reporting requirements to the external group. SAA reporting requirements are specified in this Governance Manual section.
      • Group mechanics (number of meetings, locations, etc.).
      • Relationship to standing SAA bodies, including the reporting relationship of the representative to Council or a specified Council-appointed group.
      • Group contact information.
    2. Requests for representation must include a charge and must be approved by the Council before a representative can be appointed and representation initiated.

B. Appointment and Expectations for Representatives

  1. The SAA vice president/president-elect appoints representatives, who must be SAA members in good standing, to external groups as part of the annual appointments process, unless otherwise specified in the representative's charge.
  2. The vice president/president-elect, acting in consultation with the Executive Committee as appropriate, appoints replacement external representatives outside of the normal appointments process when necessary.
  3. Official SAA representatives to external groups report to the Council, or to Council-appointed groups, as specified in their charge.
  4. The following expectations must be met by external representatives:
    1. Attend meetings of the external committee/body if feasible.
    2. If unable to attend a meeting, inform the chair(s) of the SAA group to whom the representative reports, as specified in her/his charge, and discuss whether a substitute attendee should be designated.
    3. In all cases the appointed SAA representative is responsible for obtaining information about the meetings of the external group on which she/he represents SAA and including that information in any reports compiled and submitted.
    4. Representatives typically are expected to fund expenses relating to representation. Exceptions to this are noted in the charge of the specific representative.

C. Consultation and Reporting

  1. All reporting requirements here specified are the responsibility of the appointed SAA representative, regardless of whether she/he is able to attend meetings of the external group.
  2. Appointed SAA representatives to external groups must complete an annual report, using the Council Report Template provided on the SAA website, and file it with the group to which the representative reports by the specified deadline each year.
  3. From time to time issues may arise that will have a long-range impact on SAA policy or a significant portion of the profession, or about which SAA will be asked to take a position. In such cases, representatives will seek the advice of the SAA president and/or the executive director prior to any anticipated action on the issue. Representatives whose charge specifies reporting to a Council-appointed group (e.g., Standards Committee) should include the chair(s) of that group in any communications with the SAA president or executive director. The president and/or executive director may in turn wish to bring such issues before the Executive Committee or the full Council for consideration and advice or direction to the representatives.

D. Council Review of Representatives and Charges

  1. The success and continued benefits of each external representation are reviewed at the end of each appointment cycle prior to making a new or renewed appointment of the representative.
  2. The review process draws on assessment of the annual reports submitted by the representative under review, input from relevant SAA component groups, and input from the incumbent representative. The review includes a review of the official charge for the representative and recommendations to the Council for necessary changes.
  3. The vice president/president-elect may conduct the review her- or himself, or involve the Executive Committee.
  4. Each year the vice president prepares a list of external organizations whose representatives’ terms are expiring, including those with representatives who report directly to SAA groups. That list, along with the vice president’s recommendations, developed in consultation with relevant SAA groups where appropriate, will be presented to the Council before the call for volunteers opens. The Council will determine whether new appointments should be made or the representation should be discontinued.
  5. New appointments or reappointments are made by the vice president/president-elect as part of the normal appointments process.

Approved by the Council: June 1988
Revised: January 1991, August 2012, May 2013

Section XII: Fellows, Awards, and Scholarships

See also: Section VII: Committees and Boards for general guidelines
              SAA Awards Program

Archival Innovator Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created in 2011, this award recognizes an individual archivist, a group of archivists, a repository, or an organization that demonstrates, through a combination of as many as possible of the criteria below, the greatest overall current impact on the profession or their communities.   

  • Creativity or innovation in approaching professional challenges.
  • Demonstrated ability to think outside of professional or institutional norms.
  • Ability to translate creativity, innovation, and new thinking into working solutions.
  • Development of an archives program or outreach activity that has an extraordinary impact on a community.
  • Commitment to the advancement of professional knowledge through traditional or emerging information-sharing media.  

Eligibility:

Presented to an archivist, group of archivists, repository, or organization for work undertaken within the past three years. The work need not be completed, but it must be sufficiently advanced to demonstrate results.

Sponsor and Funding:

Society of American Archivists Foundation.

Prize:

A certificate and complimentary registration for one individual to the SAA Annual Meeting occurring in the year in which the award is presented. 

First Awarded:

2012

Selection Committee

The Archival Innovators Award Subcommittee of the Awards Committee is composed of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the SAA Awards Committee (ex officio). One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair and shall present the award during the Awards Ceremony at the SAA Annual Meeting.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the nomination form.

 


 

Archival Innovator Award Recipients

2012:   Not awarded

2013:   Augmented Processing Table Research Team, The University of Texas at Austin School of Information, 
          Dr. Ciaran B. Trace and Dr. Luis Francisco-Revilla

2014:   Trevor Owens, National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program at the Library of Congress

2015:   State Archives of Florida's Florida Memory Team

2016:   Dr. Foy Scalf, head of the Research Archives and Integrated Database Project Team at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago

C.F.W. Coker Award for Description

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1984, this award recognizes finding aids, finding aid systems, projects that involve innovative development in archival description, or descriptive tools that enable archivists to produce effective finding aids. To merit serious consideration for the award, nominees must, in some significant way, set national standards, represent a model for archival description, or otherwise have a substantial impact on descriptive practices. The following types of works or activities may be considered:

  1. Finding aids, including, among others, multi-institutional guides, record surveys, repository guides, special subject lists, finding aids to individual collections or records groups, and narrative descriptions of holdings.
  2. Finding aid systems, including, among others, manual or automatic indexing systems, computer databases, or current awareness systems for notifying users of holdings.
  3. Descriptive tools that enable archivists to produce more effective finding aids, including, among others, subject thesauri, authority files, data element dictionaries, manuals establishing descriptive standards, and such reference works as atlases and administrative histories.
  4. Projects that involve innovative developments in archival description, including, among others, cooperative ventures that result in the exchange of finding aid information among repositories, efforts at building national information systems, and survey projects.

Eligibility:

Individuals, institutions, or groups of individuals or institutions. There are no restrictions on the format in which information is presented and formats may include printed volumes, card catalogs, computerized files, microforms, and slide presentations. Both published and unpublished works produced during the preceding calendar year are eligible. This award is not intended for books or articles on descriptive theory. Works and activities must involve projects located primarily in North America.

Nomination Requirements:

A completed nomination form and the required number of copies of the finding aid.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, in memory of C.F.W. Coker, a Fellow of the Society of American Archivists who worked at the National Archives and Records Administration and the Library of Congress, where he was the head of the Reference and Reader Service Section in the Manuscript Division. Coker was also director of the Modern Archives Institute, editor of The American Archivist, and general editor of the first SAA Basic Manual Series.

Prize:

A certificate and a cash prize of $250.

First Awarded:

1984

Selection Committee:

The Coker Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of four members of the Society of American Archivists (one of whom shall be the current chair of the Description Section, who shall serve a term concurrent with his or her office) and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). One of the remaining members of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as chair and present the award.

Application Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the application form.


C.F.W. Coker Award Recipients:

1984:   Roy Turnbaugh

1985:   Debra L. Newman

1986:   Nancy Sahli, Lisa B. Weber

1987:   Not awarded

1988:   Frederick Honhart

1989:   Scott Cline

1990:   The Center for Legislative Archives (NARA)

1991:   David Brumberg, Elaine Engst

1992:   Not awarded

1993:   Diane Vogt-O'Connor

1994:   Not awarded

1995:   Robert M. Kvasnicka

1996:   Not awarded

1997:   Robert B. Matchette; Honorable Mention: Mary Lynn McCree Bryan

1998:   Encoded Archival Description Working Group

1999:   Francis X. Blouin, Leonard A. Coombs, Claudia Carlen, Elizabeth Yakel, Katherine J. Gill

2000:   Not awarded

2001:   Waverly Lowell, Kelcy Shepherd

2002:   Not awarded

2003:   Not awarded

2004:   RLG's EAD Advisory Group

2005:   Online Archives of California

2006:  The Walt Whitman Archive

2007:   Greg Bradsher

2008:   The Archivists’ Toolkit™ (AT)

2009:   World War II: Guide to Records Relating to U.S. Military Participation

2010:  North Carolina State University Libraries Special Collections Research Center

2011:  John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

2012:  Not awarded

2013:  Princeton University Library Archival Description Working Group: 
          Daniel Santamaria (chair), Maureen Callahan, John Delaney, Shaun Ellis, Regine Heberlein, 
          Jon Stroop, and Don Thornbury

2014:  Remixing Archival Metadata Project, University of Miami

2015:  The Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC) Project

2016:   Not awarded

Council Exemplary Service Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created by the SAA Council in 1980 at the request of the Committee on the Selection of SAA Fellows, this citation recognizes a special contribution to the archives profession, and especially to SAA, that is not eligible for one of the other awards given by the Society. It is given on an occasional basis at the discretion of the Council or upon recommendation to the Council by the Awards Committee.

Prize:

A plaque.

First Awarded:

1980

Selection Committee:

The SAA Council.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

Not applicable. 


Council Exemplary Service Award Recipients:

1980:   Mary Walton Livingston

1981-88:   Not awarded

1989:   Edie Hedlin, Paul Chestnut, J. Frank Cook, James B. Rhoads, Carole Huxley

1990:   Not awarded

1991:   Susan Grigg, Timothy Ericson

1992-97:   Not awarded

1998:   Dennis Harrison, Kris Kiesling

1999:   Not awarded

2000:   Not awarded

2001:   Carroll Dendler

2002:   Not awarded

2003:   Brenda Banks, Carroll Dendler, Alexandra Gressitt, Debra Nolan

2004:   John W. Carlin

2005:   Robert S. Martin

2006:   Robert M. Schmidt

2007:   Trudy Huskamp Peterson, Victoria Irons Walch

2008:   Troup County (Georgia) Archives, Larry Gates, Teresa Brinati

2009:   SAA's Intellectual Property Working Group, David B. Gracy II

2010:   David Carmicheal, Kathleen Roe, U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy (VT)

2011:   Mary Jo Pugh

2012:   Native American Protocols Forum Working Group, Michael J. Fox, Nancy P. Beaumont

2013:   Peter J. Wosh

2014:   Solveig De Sutter

2015:   Mark. A. Greene, Digital Archives Specialist Subcommittee of the Education Committe, and Committee on Advocacy and Public Policy 

2016:   Business Archives Section, Oral History Section, William J. Maher

Distinguished Service Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created in 1964 and revised in 1993, this award recognizes an archival institution, education program, nonprofit organization, or government organization that has provided outstanding service to its public and has made an exemplary contribution to the archives profession. The institution being nominated should have achieved distinction in one or more of the following ways:

  • Demonstrably contributing to archival theory and the development of new archival practice.
  • Serving its constituency in an outstanding fashion.
  • Showing extraordinary ingenuity and resourcefulness in improving efficiency of operations or methods of work.
  • Going well beyond the normal performance requirements expected of an archival agency and thus providing a model for others.
  • Developing over a period of years an archives program of such depth and scope as to warrant special recognition.

Eligibility:

Any archival institution, archival organization, records center, or manuscript repository, archival education program, or nonprofit or government organization providing service or support to the archives community in North America.

Nomination Requirements:

In addition to a completed nomination form, each nomination must include letters of support from three SAA members, each representing a different institution. Self-nominations are accepted and encouraged.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation through the generosity of three SAA Fellows:
Leon de Valinger, Jr., Mary Givens Bryan, and Delores Renze.

Prize:

A plaque.

First Awarded:

1964

Selection Committee:

The Distinguished Service Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee is composed of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair and shall present the award during the Awards Ceremony at the SAA Annual Meeting.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the nomination form.

 


 

Distinguished Service Award Recipients:

1964:   North Carolina Department of Archives and History

1965:   Maryland Hall of Records

1966:   Wisconsin State Historical Society, Department of Archives and Manuscripts

1967:   Not awarded

1968:   Not awarded

1969:   Colorado Division of State Archives and Public Records

1970:   Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

1972:   Oregon State Archives

1975:   Ohio Historical Society

1976:   Wayne State University, Archives of Labor History and Urban Affairs

1977:   Georgia Department of Archives and History

1980:   Minnesota Historical Society, Division of Archives and Manuscripts

1981:   City of Toronto Archives

1982:   Illinois State Archives

1983:   Not awarded

1984:   Public Archives of Canada

1985:   American Institute of Physics, Center for the History of Physics

1986:   Not awarded

1987:   New York State Archives

1988:   Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

1989:   Not awarded

1990:   The Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Radcliffe Institute for  
           Advanced Study, Harvard University

1991:   Billy Graham Center Archives, Wheaton College

1992:   Oberlin College Archives

1993:   Not awarded

1994:   The Research Libraries Group

1995:   Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives, The Johns Hopkins University

1996:   Not awarded

1997:   Not awarded

1998:   Masters of Archival Studies Program at the University of British Columbia

1999:   Not awarded

2000:   Not awarded

2001:   The Ohio Historical Society

2002:   Duke University

2003:   Not awarded

2004:   The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

2005:   Not awarded

2006:   The Modern Archives Institute, National Archives and Records Administration

2007:   Not awarded

2008:   Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, University of Connecticut

2009:   National Historical Publications and Records Commission, National Archives and Records Administration

2010:   American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

2011:   Not awarded

2012:   Archival Education Collaborative

2013:   Black Metropolis Research Consortium

2014:   Not awarded

2015:   Archives Leadership Institute

2016:   Georgia Archives Institute 

Diversity Award

 

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 2011 and intended to address SAA’s Strategic Priority on Diversity, this award recognizes an individual, group, or institution for outstanding contributions in advancing diversity within the archives profession, SAA, or the archival record. Nominees will have demonstrated significant achievement in the form of activism, education, outreach, publication, service, or other initiatives in the archives field. The award is given based on the long-term impact on improving and promoting diversity as defined in the SAA Statement on Diversity.

Eligibility:

Open to an individual, group, or organization. To encourage SAA member participation, preference may be given to SAA individual and/or institutional members.

Nomination Requirements:

Two letters of support. Nominations will be accepted from any individual, group, or institution. 

Sponsor and Funding:

Society of American Archivists Foundation.

Prize

Up to two awards may be given each year. The prize will include a certificate and one complimentary registration per awardee to the SAA Annual Meeting occurring in the year in which the award is presented.

First Awarded:

2012

Selection Committee:

The Diversity Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee is composed of four members of the Society of American Archivists (one of whom shall be the current chair of the Diversity Committee) and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). Of the three remaining members, one shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term.  The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair and shall present the award during the Awards Ceremony at the SAA Annual Meeting.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the application form.

 


Diversity Award Recipients:

2012: The Chicano Studies Research Center

2013:  Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University 
          Joan Krizack, Archives Consultant
          Karen Underhill, Northern Arizona University’s Cline Library

2014:  Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Program, University of Houston
          Jennifer O'Neal, University of Oregon Libraries

2015:  The Shorefront Legacy Center
         Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, University of Florida

2016:   SAA Latin American and Cultural Heritage Archives Roundtable webinar series, “Desmantelando Fronteras/Breaking Down Borders”

Donald Peterson Student Travel Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 2005, this award supports students and recent graduates from graduate archival programs within North America to attend SAA’s Annual Meeting. The goal of the scholarship is to stimulate greater participation in the activities of the Association by students and recent graduates. This participation must include either a presentation of research during the Annual Meeting or active participation in an SAA-sponsored committee, section, or roundtable.

Eligibility:

Awarded to an SAA member in good standing who is currently enrolled in an archival education program or who graduated from an archival education program in the previous calendar year. Applications are evaluated based on the merits of the applicant’s essay and letters of recommendation. If the scholarship is declined by an individual selected by the subcommittee, the subcommittee may select an alternate from the pool of applications received for that year. If, for any reason, the subcommittee is unable to select an awardee, it may choose not to award the scholarship for that year.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, in honor of Donald Peterson (1908-1999), New York lawyer and philatelist, whose deep appreciation of world history and preservation developed early through his stamp collecting and held true throughout his life.

Prize:

Up to $1,000 in support of registration, travel, and accommodation expenses associated with the SAA Annual Meeting.

First Awarded:

2006

Selection Committee:

The subcommittee consists of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the SAA Awards Committee (ex officio). The members shall be appointed as necessary by the SAA President-Elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as chair and present the award.

Application Form and Supplementary Documentation:

Submit the following:  

1. A 500-word essay describing the applicant's career goals and potential impact on the archival profession.
2. Unofficial transcript to verify student status or copy of graduate diploma.
3. Two letters of recommendation from individuals having definite knowledge of the applicant's qualifications.
4. CLICK HERE to download the application form.

Application Deadline:

All applications shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.


Donald Peterson Award Recipients:

2006:   Jessica Lemieux

2007:   Chela Scott Weber

2008:   Katherine Blank

2009:   Jessica Sedgwick

2010:   Keara Duggan

2011:   Brittany Turner

2012:   Amanda Strauss

2013:   Samantha Norling (Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis)

2014:   Michelle Chiles (Simmons College)

2015:   Colin Post (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

2016:   Alessandro Meregaglia (Indiana University Bloomington)

Emerging Leader Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created in 2011, this award celebrates and encourages early-career archivists who have completed archival work of broad merit, demonstrated significant promise of leadership, and/or performed commendable service to the archives profession. 

Nominees will have more than two years and less than ten years of professional archives experience. Nominees must be SAA members and must meet as many of the following criteria as possible:

  • Work of merit that has made a substantive contribution to an area (or areas) of the archives profession beyond the nominee’s local institution and that holds promise for future contributions.
  • Demonstrated leadership through collaborative work or exemplary service to local, regional, and/or national archival and cultural associations.
  • Formal archival education through a graduate degree program in history, library science, information science, or a related field; through participation in an archival or preservation institute; and/or through certification by the Academy of Certified Archivists.
  • Involvement in successful outreach and advocacy efforts on behalf of the nominee’s institution and the archives profession.

Eligibility:

An individual archivist who has completed between two and ten years of experience. The award is given based on the total experience of the awardee, including knowledge, leadership, participation, and/or achievements in the profession.

Nomination Requirements:

In addition to a completed nomination form, each nomination must include the nominee's résumé and three letters of support from colleagues who are familiar with the nominee’s work and professional activities. 

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation.

Prize:

A certificate. 

First Awarded:

2012

Selection Committee:

The Emerging Leader Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the SAA Awards Committee (ex officio). One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair and shall present the award during the Awards Ceremony at the SAA Annual Meeting.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the nomination form.

 


 Emerging Leader Award Recipients:

2012: Mark Matienzo

2013: Tanya Marshall

2014: Beth Shields, Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives

2015: Cheryl Oestreicher, Boise State University

2016: Matt Gorzalski, Southern Illinois University Carbondale 

F. Gerald Ham and Elsie Ham Scholarship

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

In January 1998, SAA Fellow, past president, and long-time member F. Gerald Ham and his wife Elsie established the F. Gerald Ham and Elsie Ham Scholarship Fund. The purpose of the fund, endowed in 2008, is to provide financial support to graduate students in a professional archival studies program. Criteria for selection of the award recipient includes the applicant’s past performance in her/his graduate program in archival studies as well as a faculty member's assessment of the student’s prospects for contributing to the archives profession. Selection will be made based on merit.

Eligibility:

The scholarship funds must be used to support the graduate archival education of a student who is studying at a United States university program that meets the criteria for graduate education set forth by the Society of American Archivists' Guidelines for a Graduate Program in Archival Studies. The student must have successfully completed a minimum of three (3) semester credit hours, or the equivalent, of a course(s) meeting the definition of "core archival knowledge" presented in the Guidelines.

Application Requirements:

Applications must include the following documents: 

  • A cover letter stating interest in the scholarship and providing background on the applicant’s interests.
  • A current curriculum vitae.
  • An official transcript of the applicant’s grades since entering the graduate program.
  • One letter of recommendation from an instructor in the applicant’s graduate program in archival studies, and the names/contact info for two references.
  • An attachment (no limit on length) that demonstrates the applicant’s ability to “think like an archivist.” The submission may include a summary of research conducted as a student, a seminar paper, a published article, or a project description. Finding aid submissions should be accompanied by an overview of the principles applied in creating the description.
  • CLICK HERE to download the RTF application form.  

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation.

Selection Committee:

The Ham Scholarship Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee is composed of three SAA Fellows and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio).  One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term.  The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair.

Scholarship Award:

A scholarship of $10,000. Also included is complimentary registration to the SAA Annual Meeting in the year in which the scholarship is received.

First Awarded:

2008

Application Deadline:

All applications shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year. 

 


Elsie Ham and F. Gerald Ham Scholarship Recipients:

2008:   Emiko Hastings (University of Michigan) and Becky Robbins (Simmons College)

2009:   Andy (Jonathan) Uhrich (New York University)

2010:   Venus E. Van Ness (State University of New York at Albany)

2011:   Eric Willey (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

2012:   Jarrett M. Drake (University of Michigan) and Nathan Sowry (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

2013:   Catherine L. Miller (Clayton State University)

2014:   William J. Levay (Pratt Institute)

2015:   Noah Geraci (University of California, Los Angeles)

2016:   Katherine Madison (University of Pittsburgh) 

Fellows of the Society of American Archivists

Established in 1957, the distinction of Fellow is the highest honor bestowed on individuals by SAA and is awarded for outstanding contributions to the archival profession. This is an elite recognition and in accordance with SAA's constitution, the total number of Fellows may not exceed five percent of the SAA membership as of the previous annual business meeting.

[Distinguished Fellows of the Society of American Archivists, 1957–date]

Criteria:

Candidates must qualify based on meeting every one of the following criteria:

  • Appropriate academic education and professional and technical training in any of the fields of SAA's interest.
  • Professional experience in any of the fields of SAA's objectives for a minimum of seven years, which shall include evidence of professional responsibility.
  • Contributions to the profession demonstrating initiative, resourcefulness, and commitment.
  • Writings, presentations, and/or educational services (such as workshops or seminars) of superior quality and usefulness contributing to the realization of SAA's objectives.
  • Contributions to the archives profession through active participation in SAA and innovative or outstanding work on behalf of SAA.
  • Be an individual member of SAA in good standing for at least seven years immediately preceding his/her election.

How to Prepare a Nomination:

Individual members, primary contacts of institutional members, student members, and associate members are eligible to nominate SAA Fellows. Nomination packages must include the following (incomplete packages will not be considered)

  • A completed nomination form that includes:
    • Confirmation from the SAA office that the individual has been an individual member in good standing for seven (continuous) years prior to nomination.
    • For each of the criteria, a persuasive argument that justifies how the nominee has distinguished her/himself at a level that merits being selected as a Fellow. A recitation of facts, such as a list of publications, is not sufficient, and would often be redundant with the nominee’s resume. The nomination should describe how those facts are exceptional, such as the impact that the nominee's publications have had on the profession. Nominations will be judged in part on these descriptions. 
    • A list of individuals who have agreed to write letters of support for the nomination.
  • At least three, but no more than five, letters of support from individuals who are familiar with the nominee’s work or contributions to the profession. Ideally each letter should address a different aspect of the nominee’s contributions to SAA and/or the profession. Letters may be written by individuals who are not members of SAA. Letters may be included as a package or sent directly to the committee chair in care of the SAA Office. Letters must be postmarked no later than February 28.
  • The nominee’s resume or vita.

Nomination Form:

Download the nomination form as a PDF or RTF.  Send the completed form and supplementary documentation to:

awards[at]archivists.org

Please indicate "Fellow Nomination" in the email subject line. Use standard file applications such as Word, Excel, or Adobe; attachments should not exceed 5MB.

 Submissions also are acceptable via delivery and can be sent to: 

Chair, Committee on the Selection of Fellows
Society of American Archivists
17 North State Street, Suite 1425
Chicago, IL 60602

Submission Deadline:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28.

Fellows' Ernst Posner Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1982, this award recognizes an outstanding essay dealing with some facet of archival administration, history, theory, and/or methodology that was published during the preceding year in The American Archivist.

Eligibility:

Author(s) of an article published in The American Archivist during the preceding year.

Sponsor and Funding:

The award is funded by the Society of American Archivists Foundation.  The Fellows of the Society of American Archivists sponsor this award honoring Ernst Posner, a former state archivist of the Prussian State Archives who emigrated to the United States in 1939 and joined the faculty of the American University. Posner was an SAA Fellow and President as well as author of American State Archives and Archives in the Ancient World.

Prize:

A certificate and a cash prize of $500.

First Awarded:

1983

Selection Committee:

The Fellows' Ernst Posner Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee is composed of three Fellows of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). The SAA President-elect shall appoint one member of the subcommittee each year for a term of three years after soliciting nominations from the Fellows Steering Committee. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair and present the award.

Submission Deadline:

All articles appearing in a specific volume of The American Archivist are reviewed by the subcommittee, which selects the award recipient.  No nomination or application is made.


Fellows' Ernst Posner Award Recipients: 

2016:  Wendy Duff and Jessica Haskell, “New Uses for Old Records: A Rhizomatic Approach to Archival Access,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2015, Vol. 78, No. 1) 

2015:  Kit Hughes, “Appraisal as Cartography: Cultural Studies in the Archives,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2014, Vol. 77, No. 1)  

2014:  Not Awarded  

2013:  Scott Cline, “’Dust Clouds of Camels Shall Cover You’: Covenant and the Archival Endeavor,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2012, Vol. 75, No. 2)  

2012:  Douglas Cox, “National Archives and International Conflicts: The Society of American Archivists and War,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2011, Vol. 74, No. 2)  

2011:  Paul Conway, “Modes of Seeing: Digitized Photographic Archives and the Experienced User,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2010, Vol. 73, No. 2)  

2010:  Scott Cline, “’To the Limit of our Integrity’: Reflections on Archival Being,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2009, Vol. 72, No. 2)  

2009:  Geoffrey Yeo, “Concepts of Record (2): Prototypes and Boundary Objects,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2008, Vol. 71, No. 1) 

2008:  Magia Ghetu Krause and Elizabeth Yakel, “Interaction in Virtual Archives: The Polar Bear Expedition Digital Collections Next Generation Finding Aid,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2007, Vol. 70, No. 2) 

2007:  A*CENSUS Working Group, “Archival Census and Education Needs Survey in the United States,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2006, Vol. 69, No. 2) 

2006:  Timothy L. Ericson, “Building our Own ‘Iron Curtain’: The Emergence of Secrecy in American Government,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2005, Vol. 68, No. 1)

2005:  Elena Danielson, “Privacy Rights and the Rights of Political Victims: Implications of the German Experience,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2004, Vol. 67, No. 2) 

2004:  James M. O’Toole, “Democracy—and Documents—in America,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2002, Vol. 65, No. 1) AND George Bolotenko, “Frost on the Walls in Winter: Russian and Ukrainian Archives since the Great Dislocation (1991-1999),” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2003, Vol. 66, No. 2)

2003:  William G. Rosenberg, “Politics in the (Russian) Archives: The ‘Objectivity Question,’ Trust and the Limitations of Law,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2001, Vol. 64, No. 1) 

2002:  Terry Cook, “’The Imperative of Challenging Absolutes’ in Graduate Archival Education Programs: Issues for Educators and the Profession,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2000, Vol. 63, No. 2) 

2001:  Philip C. Bantin, “The Indiana University Electronic Records Project Revisited,” The American Archivist (Spring 1999, Vol. 62, No. 1) 

2000:  Peter Wosh, “Research and Reality Checks: Change and Continuity in NYU’s Archival Management Program,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2000, Vol. 63, No. 2)  

1999:  Roy Turnbaugh, “Information Technology, Records, and State Archives,” The American Archivist (Spring 1997, Vol. 60, No. 2)  

1998:  Tyler O. Walters, “Special Collections Repositories at Association of Research Libraries Institutions: A Study of Current Practices in Preservation Management,” The American Archivist (Spring 1998, Vol. 61, No. 1) 

1997:  “Special Issue on Case Studies of the Committee on Automated Records and Techniques,” The American Archivist (Spring 1995, Vol. 58, No. 2) 

1996:  Not awarded  

1995:  James M. O’Toole, “On the Idea of Uniqueness,” The American Archivist (Fall 1994, Vol. 57, No. 4)  

1994:  Not awarded 

1993:  Avra S. Michelson and Jeff Rothenberg, “Scholarly Communication and Information Technology: Exploring the Impact of Changes in the Research Process on Archives,” The American Archivist (Spring 1992, Vol. 55, No. 2) 

1992:  Frederick J. Stielow, “Archival Theory Redux and Redeemed: Definition and Context Toward a General Theory,” The American Archivist (Winter 1991, Vol. 54, No. 1) 

1991:  James M. O’Toole, “Curriculum Development in Archival Education: A Proposal,” The American Archivist (Summer 1990, Vol. 53, No. 3) 

1990:  Working Group on Standards for Archival Description, “Archival Description Standards: Establishing a Process for Their Development and Implementation,” The American Archivist (Fall 1989, Vol. 52, No. 4) 

1989:  Not Awarded 

1988:  Avra Michelson, “Description and Reference in the Age of Automation,” The American Archivist (Spring 1987, Vol. 50, No. 2) 

1987:  Trudy Huskamp Peterson, “The National Archives and the Archival Theorist Revisited, 1954-1984,” The American Archivist (Spring 1986, Vol. 49, No. 2) 

1986:  Joanne Yates, “Internal Communication Systems in American Business Structures: A Framework to Aid Appraisal,” The American Archivist (Spring 1985, Vol. 48, No. 2) 

1985:  F. Gerald Ham, “Archival Choices: Managing the Historical Record in an Age of Abundance,” The American Archivist (Winter 1984, Vol. 47, No. 1) 

1984:  Frank G. Burke, “Archival Cooperation,” The American Archivist (Summer 1983, Vol. 46, No. 3) 

1983:  Mary Jo Pugh, “The Illusion of Omniscience: Subject Access and the Reference Archivist,” The American Archivist (Winter 1982, Vol. 45, No. 1) 

Harold T. Pinkett Minority Student Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1993, this award recognizes and acknowledges minority graduate students, such as those of African, Asian, Latino or Native American descent, who, through scholastic and personal achievement, manifest an interest in becoming professional archivists and active members of the Society of American Archivists.

This award supports the Society of American Archivists' Archivists and Archives of Color Section objectives of:

1. Identifying minority students enrolled in postsecondary educational institutions.
2. Encouraging minority students to consider careers in the archival profession.
3. Promoting increased minority participation in SAA by exposing minority students to the experience of attending national meetings and encouraging them to join and remain members of the organization.

Recipients will be selected based on their submission of a completed application and the strength of their letter of recommendation and personal statement. Personal statements will be evaluated based on:

  • Overall clarity;
  • Understanding of professional goals;
  • Description of benefits of attending the SAA Annual Meeting; and
  • Explanation of commitment to SAA and the profession.

Eligibility:

Awarded to minority students, with preference given to full-time students possessing a minimum scholastic grade point average of 3.5 while enrolled in a graduate program focusing on archival management during the academic year preceding the date on which the award is given. 

Sponsor and Funding:

Sponsored by the Society of American Archivists' Archivists and Archives of Color Section and funded through the SAA Foundation, the award is named in honor of archival pioneer Harold T. Pinkett, the first African American to be appointed an archivist at the National Archives, where he served for more than 35 years as a specialist in agricultural archives, senior records appraiser, and chief archivist of the Natural Resources Records Branch. A Fellow of SAA, Pinkett served as editor of The American Archivist from 1968 to 1971.

Prize:

Up to two awards may be given during an awards cycle. Each recipient receives full complimentary registration and related expenses for hotel and travel to attend the SAA Annual Meeting during the year in which the award is received. In addition, each recipient receives a complimentary one-year membership in SAA.

First Awarded:

1994

Selection Committee:

The committee consists of the chair of the Archivists and Archives of Color Section, one member of the Archivists and Archives of Color Section selected by the chair of the roundtable to serve a one-year term, one SAA member selected by the SAA President-elect to serve a one-year term, and one of the co-chairs of the SAA Awards Committee (ex officio). The Chair of the Archivists and Archives of Color Section shall serve as chair of the subcommittee and shall present the award.

Application Deadline and Requirements:

All applications shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.

 Applications must include the following documents:

  • Photocopy of official transcript or grade report with applicant’s current GPA listed.
  • At least one letter of recommendation
  • Essay of no more than 500 words discussing your experiences with and/or commitment to working with, or documenting and preserving, the histories of communities of color
  • CV or resumé 
  • CLICK HERE to download application form.

 


Pinkett Award Recipients:

1994: Kathryn M. Neal (University of Michigan)

1995: Ida E. Jones (Howard University)

1996: Letha Johnson (Washburn University)

1997: Gloria Meraz (University of Texas at Austin)

1998: Elenita M. Tapawan (University of Hawaii, Honolulu)

1999: Teresa Maria Mora (New York University), Tywanna Marie Whorley (University of Pittsburgh)

2000: Not awarded

2001: Rose Roberto (University of California, Los Angeles)

2002: Petrina D. Jackson (University of Pittsburgh)

2003: Michelle Baildon (Simmons College)

2004: Josué Hurtado (University of Michigan), Georgette Mayo (University of South Carolina)

2005: Jennifer Osorio (University of California, Los Angeles), Paul Sevilla (University of California, Los Angeles)

2006: Lanell James (University of Michigan), Shawn Phillip San Roman (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

2007: Bergis K. Jules (Indiana University), Janel Quirante (University of Hawaii at Manoa)

2008: Monique Lloyd (Emporia State University), Tiffany-Kay Sangwand (University of California, Los Angeles)

2009: Krystal Appiah (University of California, Los Angeles), I-Ting Emily Chu (New York University)

2010: Miranda N. Rivers (Simmons College), Vivian Wong (UCLA)

2011: Kelly E. Lau (University of British Columbia) and Melvin J. Collier (Clayton State University)

2012: Kapena Shim (University of Hawai‘i Mānoa)

2013: Lori E. Harris (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Angel Maria Diaz (University of California, Los Angeles)

2014: Allan Jason Sarmiento (California State University, Sacramento), Raquel Flores-Clemons (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

2015: Talia Guzmán-González (University of Maryland, College Park)
Rachel E. Winston (University of Texas at Austin)

2016: Gailyn Lehuanani Bopp (University of Hawai’i at Manoa)                                        Karen Li-Lun Hwang (Pratt Institute)

J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1989, this award honors an individual, institution, or organization that promotes greater public awareness, appreciation, or support of archival activities or programs. The individual's or institution's contributions may take the form of advocacy, publicity, legislation, financial support, or a similar action that fosters archival work or raises public consciousness of the importance of archival work. Contributions should have broad, long-term impact at the regional level or beyond. Up to three awards may be given each year.

Eligibility:

Nominees must be from outside the archives profession. Individuals directly involved in archival work, either as paid or volunteer staff, or institutions or organizations directly responsible for an archival program are not eligible for this award.

Nomination Requirements:

A completed nomination form.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, in honor of J. Franklin Jameson, a noted American historian, former president of the American Historical Association, and long-time advocate for the establishment of a U.S. National Archives.

Prize:

A plaque.

First Awarded:

1989

Selection Committee:

The J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of four members of the Society of American Archivists (one of whom shall be the current chair of the Reference, Access, and Outreach Section, who shall serve a term concurrent with his or her office) and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio).  One of the remaining members of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term.  The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair and shall present the award.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the nomination form.


J. Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award Recipients:

        1989:   U.S. Senator Thomas F. Eagleton (D-Missouri)

1990:   U.S. Senator Mark O. Hatfield (R-Oregon)

1991:   New York State Assembleyman William B. Hoyt and The Mellon Foundation

1992:   Not awarded

1993:   Thomas D. Clark, Louise McBee, John Marshall

1994:   Hudson's Bay Company

1995:   Not awarded

1996:   Richard Benson

1997:   Kraft Foods, Inc.

1998:   Newsday

1999:   John B. Harlan

2000:   Not awarded

2001:   Not awarded

2002:   Joan Winters, Louise Addis

2003:   Arizona State University

2004:   Not awarded

2005:   George F. Farr, Jr.

2006:   U.S. Senator Harry Reid (D-Nevada)

2007:  The Chicago Tribune (accepted by Debra K. Bade)

2008:  Data-Intensive Cyber Environments (DICE)

2009:  Ross King (Georgia Historical Records Advisory Board)

2010:  The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

2011:  “Who Do You Think You Are?” (NBC)

2012:   Eve Kahn, Bebe Miller, Phillip Stewart

2013:   AARP Virginia and Dr. Warren Stewart

2014:   LGBT Center of Central PA History Project

                   National History Day

2015:   Adrena Ifill Blagburn

2016:   Lin-Manuel Miranda and Ron Chernow

Josephine Forman Scholarship

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in October 2010 by the General Commission on Archives and History of The United Methodist Church and named for Josephine Forman, archivist for 18 years of the Southwest Texas Conference of the United Methodist Church and author of We Finish to Begin: A History of Travis Park United Methodist Church, 1846–1991.

The purpose of the Josephine Forman Scholarship is to provide financial support to minority students pursuing graduate education in archival science, to encourage students to pursue a career as an archivist, and to promote the diversification of the American archives profession. The scholarship is given to applicants who demonstrate excellent potential for scholastic and personal achievement and who manifest a commitment both to the archives profession and to advancing diversity concerns within it.

Eligibility:

  • The applicant must be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States.
  • The applicant must be of American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, or Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander descent.
  • The applicant must be currently enrolled in a graduate program or a multi-course program in archival administration, or have applied to such a program for the next academic year.*
  • The applicant shall have completed no more than half of the credit requirements toward her/his graduate degree at the time of the award (i.e., June 1).
  • The applicant must be enrolled in a graduate program and begin school no later than September 1 or the fall semester/quarter immediately following the award.  Otherwise the award will be rescinded.
  • Applicants may have full-time or part-time status.

*The graduate program must offer at least three courses in archival science or be listed in the current SAA Directory of Archival Education.  If the program is not listed in the SAA Directory of Archival Education, the applicant must provide proof of the three-course standard by submitting copies of course descriptions from the institution’s current course catalog.

Application Requirements

Applications must include the following documents:

  • A cover letter stating interest in the scholarship, accompanied by an essay of not more than 500 words outlining the applicant’s future goals in the archives profession.
  • Official transcripts from the applicant’s most recent academic program.
  • Two letters of recommendation from teachers/professors and/or professional archivists.
  • CLICK HERE to download the application form.

Sponsor and Funding:

The General Commission on Archives and History (GCAH) of The United Methodist Church, in cooperation with the Society of American Archivists and the SAA Foundation.

Selection Committee:

The Forman Scholarship Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of three members of the Society of American Archivists, one GCAH staff member, and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). The SAA President-elect shall appoint one of the SAA members on the subcommittee each year for a term of three years; the senior member of this cohort in years of service shall serve as chair and present the award.

Prize:

One scholarship of $10,000. Awardees also may be invited to attend the annual meeting of the General Commission on Archives and History and/or the Quadrennial Historical Convocation, with funding provided by GCAH.

Also included is complimentary registration to the SAA Annual Meeting in the year in which the scholarship is received.

First Awarded:

2011

Application Deadline:

All applications shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year. 

Upon Receipt of the Award:

  • The award will be disbursed by the GCAH directly to the applicant’s academic program.
  • The recipient must submit a 500-word report to the GCAH and to the SAA Council upon completion of her/his second semester.
  • Awardees may be invited to attend the annual meeting of the General Commission on Archives and History and/or the Quadrennial Historical Convocation, with funding provided by GCAH.

In the event that certain conditions arise, the following shall apply:  1) if the award exceeds tuition fees for one semester, the balance may be carried over to the next semester; 2) if the recipient drops out of the archival administration program, all unused fees shall be returned to GCAH; and 3) if the recipient’s tuition is paid in full by another scholarship or award, the recipient shall decline the Forman Scholarship.


Josephine Forman Scholarship Recipients:

2011:  Nidya G. Gonzalez

2012:  Nathasha Alvarez

2013:  Kimberly Springer (University of Michigan)

2014:  Joanna Chen (University of California, Los Angeles)

2015:  Maria E. Sanchez-Tucker (University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee)

2016:  Desiree Alaniz (Simmons College)

Mosaic Scholarship

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

The Mosaic Scholarship was established by the SAA Council in August 2008 to advance SAA's Diversity Strategic Priority: To provide financial and mentoring support to minority students pursuing graduate education in archival science, to encourage students to pursue a career as an archivist, and to promote the diversification of the American archives profession. The award is given to applicants who demonstrate excellent potential for scholastic and personal achievement and who manifest a commitment both to the archives profession and to advancing diversity concerns within it.

Eligibility:

The applicant:

  • Must be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States or Canada.
  • Must be of American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, or Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander descent.
  • Must be currently enrolled in a graduate program or a multi-course program in archival administration, or have applied to such a program for the next academic year. (The graduate program must offer at least three courses in archival science or be listed in the current SAA Directory of Archival Education. If the program is not listed in the SAA Directory of Archival Education, the applicant must provide proof of the three-course standard by submitting copies of course descriptions from the institution's current course catalog.)
  • Shall have completed no more than half of the credit requirements toward her/his graduate degree at the time of award (i.e., June 1).
  • Must be enrolled in a graduate program and begin school no later than September 1 or the fall semester/quarter immediately following the award. Otherwise the award will be rescinded.
  • May have full-time or part-time status.
  • Must submit a 500-word report to the SAA Council upon completion of the second semester.

In the event that certain conditions arise, the following shall apply: 1) if the award exceeds tuition fees for one semester, the balance may be carried over to the next semester; 2) if the recipient drops out of the archival administration program, all unused fees shall be returned to SAA; and 3) if the recipient’s tuition is paid in full by another scholarship or award, the recipient shall decline the Mosaic Scholarship.

Application Requirements:

Applications must include the following documents:

  • A cover letter stating interest in the scholarship and how the applicant meets eligibility requirements.
  • Official transcripts from the applicant's most recent academic program.
  • Essay of not more than 500 words outlining the applicant's interests and future goals in the archives profession.
  • Two letters of recommendation.
  • CLICK HERE to download the application form.

Sponsors and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists and the Society of American Archivists Foundation.

Selection Committee:

The Mosaic Scholarship Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee is composed of six members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio).  Two of the six members are appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve three-year terms.  One of these appointees shall be a previous Mosaic Scholarship recipient. The chair of the subcommittee is appointed annually by the President-elect from among the third-year members. The President-elect's appointments shall be made in consultation with the chairs of the SAA Diversity Committee, the Archivists and Archives of Color Roundtable, and the Archival Educators Roundtable.

Prize:

As the SAA and SAA Foundation budgets permit, up to two scholarships of $5,000 each.  In addition, each scholarship recipient receives a one-year complimentary membership in the Society of American Archivists and complimentary registration to the Society’s Annual Meeting for the year in which the scholarship is received.

First Awarded:

2009

Application Deadline:

All applications shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year. 


Mosaic Scholarship Recipients:

2009:   Janet Ceja and Harrison Inefuku

2010:   LaNesha DeBardelaben and Susan Gehr

2011:   Rose Chou and Helen Kim

2012:   Aditi Sharma Worcester

2013:   Barrye Brown (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
          Rhonda Jones (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

2014:  Rebecca Nieto (McGill University)
         Maria E. Sanchez-Tucker (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)

2015:  Desiree Alaniz (Simmons College)

2016: Jimmy Zavala (University of California at Los Angeles)

Oliver Wendell Holmes Travel Award

Purpose:

This award enables international archivists, who are currently training or studying in the United States or Canada, to augment their experience by traveling to the Annual Meeting of the Society of American Archivists. 

Established in 1979, the award is named in honor of Oliver Wendell Holmes, who joined the National Archives staff in 1935 and served in many capacities, including that of executive director of the National Historical Publications Commission. Holmes was a Fellow of the Society of American Archivists and served as SAA's fourteenth president in 1958–1959.

Eligibility:

Archivists who are not U.S. or Canadian citizens or permanent residents.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation. 

Selection Committee:

The committee is composed of three members of the Society and one of the co-chairs of the SAA Awards Committee (ex officio). One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair.

Application Deadline and Nomination Form:

All applications shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the RTF nomination form.

Prize:

A certificate and a cash award of $1,000.

First Awarded:

1979


Recipients of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Travel Award:

1979:   Steve Mwiyeriwa (Malawi)

1980:   Not awarded

1981:   Zhang Tien-ming (China)

1982:   Egart Anderson (The Netherlands)

1983:   Stuart Strachan (New Zealand)

1984:   Alvan Ives (Australia), Aauel Polka Toe (Liberia)

1985:   Luciana Duranti (Italy), Maria Luisa Acuna (Mexico), Amanda Rosales (Mexico)

1986:   Joan VanAlbada (The Netherlands), Michael Roper (Great Britain), Michael Dreyfus, Charles Kecskemeti (France), Alvan Ives (Australia), Egart Anderson (The Netherlands), Luciana Duranti (Italy), Peter Sigmond (The Netherlands), Maryna Fraser

1987:   Jan E.A. Boomgaard (The Netherlands), Darwin Matthews (Australia), Gordon Read, Peter Sigmond (The Netherlands)

1988:   Ann Pederson (Australia), Jan E.A. Boomgaard (The Netherlands), Alan Ives (Australia)

1989:   Valerii Leonov (USSR)

1990:   Samuel Njovana (Zimbabwe)

1991:   Julie Stacker (Australia)

1992:   Veronika Emlerova (Czechoslovakia)

1993:   Not awarded

1994:   Not awarded

1995:   Not awarded

1996:   In support of an International Reception

1997:   Liu Yunming (China)

1998:   Ntombizandile Kwatsha (South Africa)

1999:   Ciaran Trace (Ireland)

2000:   Zhou Xiaomu (China)

2001:   Eun G. Park (Korea)

2002:   Not awarded

2003:   Ji-Hyun Kim (Korea)

2004:   Bart Ballaux (Belgium)

2005:   Not awarded

2006:   Not awarded

2007:   Gerald Chaudron (New Zealand)

2008:   Not awarded

2009:   Ricardo L. Punzalan (Philippines)

2010:   Elaine Goh (British Columbia, Canada)

2011:   Patrick Ansah (Ghana) and Umi Asma’ Mokhtar (Malaysia)

2012:   Georgia Barlaoura (Greece) and Lara Mancuso (Brazil)

2013:   Weimei Pan (China)

2014:   Not awarded

2015:   Mary Grace Golfo (Philippines)

2016:   Tristan Triponez (Switzerland)

Philip M. Hamer and Elizabeth Hamer Kegan Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1973 (and modified in 1987 and 1991), this award recognizes an archivist, editor, group of individuals, or institution that has increased public awareness of a specific body of documents through compilation, transcription, exhibition, or public presentation of archives or manuscript materials for educational, instructional, or other public purpose. Archives may include photographs, films, and visual archives. Publication may be in any medium.

Eligibility:

Individual archivists and editors, groups of individuals, organizations.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, with the cash prize underwritten by a fund first established by Elizabeth Hamer Kegan. The award honors two SAA Fellows and past presidents. In 1963 Elizabeth Hamer Kegan was appointed Assistant Librarian of Congress, a position in which she directed information, exhibits, publications, and international visitors' programs and shepherded the American Revolution Bicentennial Program. Her late husband, Philip M. Hamer, was a historian who served successively as head of the Library, Accessions, Reference, and Records Control divisions of the National Archives, and was the first executive director of the National Historical Publications Commission. He was the author of A Guide to the Archives and Manuscripts in the United States (1961).

Prize:

A certificate and a cash prize of $500.

First Awarded:

1973

Selection Committee:

The Hamer-Kegan Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee is composed of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as chair.

Application Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the application form.


Philip M. Hamer and Elizabeth Hamer Kegan Award Recipients:

1973:   Patricia A. Clark

1974:   David W. Hirst

1975:   Harold Dean Moser

1976:   Charles F. Hobson

1977:   Dorothy Twohig

1978:   Philander D. Chase

1979:   Raymond W. Smock

1980:   Linda J. Pike

1981:   Sharon Macpherson

1982:   Mary Dix

1983:   Robert E. McCarthy

1984:   David Wilson

1985:   Claude-Ann Lopez

1986:   Not awarded

1987:   Robert E. Bailey, Elaine S. Evans

1988:   Nancy Bartlett, Kathleen Koehler

1989:   Jane Doerr

1990:   Judy Hohmann

1991:   James D. Folts, Larry Hackman, Judy Hohmann

1992:   Elaine Forman Crane, Northeastern University Press

1993:   Carl Albert Center at University of Oklahoma

1994:   American Heritage Center at University of Wyoming

1995:   New York Public Library

1996:   Julie Daniels, Judy Hohmann, Jean West

1997:   Minnesota Historical Society

1998:   Linda A. Ries

1999:   Delaware Public Archives

2000:   Jeffrey D. Marshall, A War of the People: Vermont Civil War Letters

2001:   Shelly Henley Kelly

2002:   Vermont State Archives

2003:   New York State Archives Partnership Trust

2004:   Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

2005:   Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation

2006:  The State Library and Archives of Florida's Florida Folklife Digitization and Education Project

2007:  National Library of Medicine's Profiles in Science

2008:  Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the CBC Digital Archives (Les archives de Radio-Canada)

2009:  Ward M. Canaday Center for Special Collections of the University of Toledo

2010:  Giza Archives at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

2011:  March On Milwaukee Civil Rights History Project team (University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Libraries)

2012:  Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota

2013:  Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project

2014:  Emma Goldman Papers Project

2015:  The Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine 

2016:   South Asian American Digital Archive

Preservation Publication Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 1993, this award recognizes and acknowledges the author(s) or editor(s) of an outstanding published work related to archives preservation and, through this acknowledgment, encourages outstanding achievement by others. The work can be an article, report, chapter, or monograph in an audiovisual, electronic, or print format.

The work must contribute to the advancement of the theory and practice of preservation in archives institutions by introducing new preservation theories, methods, or techniques; by codifying principles and practices of archives preservation; by presenting the results of innovative research on matters related to archives preservation; by investigating preservation issues of current interest and importance to the archives community; or by studying aspects of the history of the archives profession.

Eligibility:

Awarded to the author(s) or editor(s) of an outstanding preservation-related work that is of relevance to the archives community and published in North America during the calendar year preceding the date on which the award is given.

Submission Requirements:

A completed nomination form and the required number of copies of the work.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists.

Prize:

A certificate.

First Awarded:

1994

Selection Committee:

The Preservation Publication Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of four members of the Society of American Archivists (one of whom shall be the current chair of the Preservation Section, who shall serve a term concurrent with his or her office) and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). One of the remaining members shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as chair.

Application Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year. CLICK HERE to download the application form.


Preservation Publication Award Recipients:

1994:   Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler, Preserving Archives and Manuscripts.
           
Special Commendation: Henry Wilhelm, The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs

1995:   Nancy E. Elkington, RLG Archives and Microfilming Manual

1996:   Anne R. Kenney, Stephen Chapman, Tutorial - Digital Resolution Requirements for Replacing Text Based Material:
            Methods for Benchmarking Image Quality

1997:   Preserving Digital Information: Report on the Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information

1998:   Not awarded

1999:   James M. Reilly, The Storage Guide for Color Photographic Materials

2000:   Eléonore Kissel and Erin Vigneau, Architectural Photoreproductions: A Manual for Identification and Care

2001:   Gregory S. Hunter, Preserving Digital Information: A How-To-Do-It Manual

2002:   Robert E. Schnare, Jr., Bibliography of Preservation Literature, 1983-1996

2003:   Not awarded

2004:   Anne R. Kenney, Nancy Y. McGovern, Digital Preservation Management: Implementing Short-term Strategies for
Long-term Problems
(Web-based tutorial)

2005:   National Film Preservation Foundation, The Film Preservation Guide: The Basics for Archives, Libraries, 
           and Museums

2006:   Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata: Final Report of the PREMIS Working Group

2007:   Heritage Preservation, Field Guide to Emergency Response

2008:   Science and Technology Council of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, The Digital Dilemma

2009:   The AIC Guide to Digital Photography and Conservation Documentation

2010: Archival and Special Collections Facilities: Guidelines for Archivists, Librarians, Architects, and Engineers,
edited by Michele F. Pacifico and Thomas P. Wilsted

2011:   Digital Curation: A How-To-Do-It Manual by Ross Harvey

2012:  Geospatial Multistate Archive and Preservation Partnership (GeoMAPP) Best Practices for Archival Processing for Geospatial Datasets

2013:   Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation, edited by Nancy Y. McGovern (volume editor) and Katherine Skinner (series editor)

2014:   Archivists' Guide to Archiving Video, published by WITNESS

2015:  From Theory to Action: “Good Enough” Digital Preservation Solutions for Under-Resourced Cultural Heritage Institutions by the Digital POWRR Team

  Special Commendation: 2015 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship by the National Digital Stewardship Alliance

2016:   Preserving Our Heritage: Perspectives from Antiquity to the Digital Age by Michele V. Cloonan

Sister M. Claude Lane, O.P., Memorial Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created in 1974, this award recognizes an individual who has made a significant contribution to the field of religious archives.  Selection criteria include:

  • Involvement and work in the Archivists of Religious Collections Section of the Society of American Archivists.
  • Contributions to archival literature that relates to religious archives.
  • Participation and leadership in religious archives organizations.
  • Evidence of leadership in a specific religious archives.

Eligibility:

Individual archivists only.

Nomination Requirements:

A completed nomination form.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, in conjunction with the Society of Southwest Archivists, in honor of Sister M. Claude Lane, O.P., the first professionally trained archivist at the Catholic Archives of Texas in Austin, who served there from 1960 until her death in 1974.

Prize:

A certificate awarded by the SAA Foundation and a cash prize provided by the Society of Southwest Archivists.

First Awarded:

1974

Selection Committee:

The Sister M. Claude Lane, O.P., Memorial Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee is composed of four members of the Society of American Archivists, at least one of whom is also a member of the Society of Southwest Archivists (SSA). In addition, one of the co-chairs of the SAA Awards Committee serves ex officio on the subcommittee. The SAA President-elect shall appoint one member of the subcommittee each year for a term of three years after having solicited nominations from the president of the SSA and from the Awards Committee co-chairs. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair. The SSA representative shall present the award during the Awards Ceremony at the SAA Annual Meeting.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the nomination form.


 

Sister M. Claude Lane, O.P., Memorial Award Recipients:

1974:   Melvin Gingerich

1975:   Eleanore Cammack

1976:   August Sueflow

1977:   V. Nelle Bellamy

1978:   Lynn May and William Miller

1979:   Sister Felicitas Powers, RSM

1980:   Sister Evangeline Thomas, CSJ

1981:   Not awarded

1982:   Barbara Smith

1983:   Not awarded

1984:   Rev. Norbert Brockman

1985:   Rev. Charles Rehkopf

1986:   James M. O'Toole

1987:   Robert Shuster

1988:   Brother Denis Sennett, Franciscan Friars of Atonement

1989:   Not awarded

1990:   Thomas Wilsted

1991:   Elizabeth Yakel

1992:   Sister Mary Linus Bax, CPPS

1993:   Peter Wosh

1994:   Sister Emma Cecilia Busam, OSU

1995:   Brother Roy Godwin, CFA

1996:   Sister Blaithin Sullivan, CSJ

1997:   Not awarded

1998:   Charles Nolan

1999:   Not awarded

2000:   Not awarded

2001:   Kinga Perzynska

2002:   Not awarded

2003:   Theresa (Terry) Thompson

2004:   John (Jac) Treanor

2005:   William Sumners

2006:   Not awarded

2007:   Roger M. Dahl

2008:   Mark Thiel

2009:   Robert Johnson-Lally

2010:   Sister Jane Aucoin, CSJ

2011:   Malachy R. McCarthy

2012:   Mark J. Duffy

2013:   Audrey Newcomer, Director, Archives and Records, Archdiocese of St. Louis

2014:   Judi Fergus, Arthur Moore Methodist Museum, Library and Archives

2015:   Diane Wells, Episcopal Diocese of Olympia in Seattle 

2016:   Denise “Dee” Gallo, Daughters of Charity in Emmitsburg, Maryland

Spotlight Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Established in 2005, this award recognizes the contributions of individuals who work for the good of the archives profession and of archival collections, and whose work would not typically receive public recognition. The nominee(s) should have achieved distinction in one or more of the following ways:

  • Participating in special projects.
  • Exhibiting tireless committee or advocacy work.
  • Responding effectively to an unforeseen or pressing need or emergency.
  • Contributing innovative or creative ideas to the profession.
  • Performing extraordinary volunteerism.
  • Quietly but effectively promoting the profession.

Eligibility:

Awarded to an individual archivist or a group of up to five archivists who have collaborated on a project. Preference is given to archivists working in smaller repositories, especially those without institutional support for professional activities.

Nomination Requirements:

A completed nomination form.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation. 

Prize:

A certificate and complimentary registration for the individual recipient or group (of up to five individuals) to the SAA Annual Meeting occurring in the year in which the award is presented.

First Awarded:

2006

Selection Committee:

The Spotlight Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio).  One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect to serve a three-year term. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair and shall present the award during the Awards Ceremony at the SAA Annual Meeting.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the application form.


Spotlight Award Recipients:

2006:   Emilie Leumas

2007:   Alan Harris Stein, Chicago Oral History Roundtable for service as “Katrina Relief Librarian”

2008:   The staff of Afghan Film

2009:   Not awarded

2010:   Ann Russell

2011:   Teresa Kiser

2012:   Cindy Ditzler and Joan Metzger

2013:   Terry Brown, volunteer archivist, Houston Symphony and Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

2014:   Kate Theimer, Spontaneous Scholarship Program

2015:   Anne Ostendarp, multimedia archivist for the Knights of Columbus and a consulting and project archivist

2016:   Marie Lascu, archivist for Crowing Rooster Arts in New York City and co-founder of Activist Archivists (2011–2015)

Theodore Calvin Pease Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created in 1987 and modified in 2007 and 2012, this award recognizes superior writing achievements by students of archival studies. Entries are judged on innovation, scholarship, pertinence, and clarity of writing. Papers examining major trends and issues in the archives profession are preferred.

Eligibility:

Eligible entries are written by students enrolled in archival studies classes at either the master’s or doctoral level. A faculty member or instructor associated with the archival studies program must submit the entry to verify that the student paper was written within the context of an archival studies program and completed during the preceding calendar year. A faculty member or instructor in an archival studies program may submit one entry per award cycle. There is no cap on the number of papers than can be submitted by a school or program, provided no individual faculty member submits more than one paper.

Entries should be unpublished manuscripts of 5,000–8,000 words, must include an abstract, and should conform to the stylistic guidelines described in the editorial policy of The American Archivist. Submit only the title with the paper. The name of the author, the program, or the faculty member or instructor must not appear on the manuscript.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, in honor of Theodore Calvin Pease, the first editor of The American Archivist.

Prize:

A certificate and cash prize of $250. The winning manuscript, after going through the editorial process with the editor of The American Archivist, will be published in The American Archivist.

First Awarded:

1988

Selection Committee:

Papers will be judged in a blind review by the Pease Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee.  The subcommittee consists of the current editor of The American Archivist, the vice chair of the Committee on Education, and a member of the Society of American Archivists with experience in archival research and literature appointed annually by the president-elect to serve a one-year term. The current editor of The American Archivist serves as the chair of the subcommittee and shall present the award. The current editor of The American Archivist also edits the manuscript and leads the student through the editorial process in preparation for publication.

Submission Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the application form.


Theodore Calvin Pease Award Recipients:

2016:  Rachel Walton (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “Looking for Answers: A Usability Study of Online Finding Aid Navigation” The American Archivist (forthcoming Spring/Summer 2017, Vol. 80, No. 1)

 2015:  Paige Hohmann (University of British Columbia), “On Impartiality and Interrelatedness: Reactions to the Jenkinsonian Appraisal in the Twentieth Century,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2016, Vol. 79, No. 1) 

2014:  Joshua D. Hager (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "To Like or Not to Like: Understanding and Maximizing the Utility of Archival Outreach on Facebook," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2015, Vol. 78, No. 1) 

2013:   Alex H. Poole (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "The Strange Career of Jim Crow Archives: Race, Space and History in the Mid-Twentieth-Century American South," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2014, Vol. 77, No. 1) 

2012:   Pam Mayer (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) "Like a Box of Chocolates: A Case Study of User-Contributed Content at Footnote," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2013, Vol. 76, No. 1) 

2011:  Lora J. Davis (University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee), "Providing Virtual Services to All: A Mixed-Method Analysis of the Web Site Accessibility of Philadelphia Area Consortium of Special Collections Libraries (PACSCL) Member Repositories," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2012, Vol. 75, No. 1) 

2010:  Emily Monks-Leeson (University of Toronto), "Archives on the Internet: Representing Contexts and Provenance from Repository to Website,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2011, Vol. 74, No. 1) 

2009:  Kathleen Fear (University of Michigan), "User Understanding of Metadata in Digital Image Collections," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2010, Vol. 73, No. 1) 

2008:  Mary Samouelian (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "Embracing Web 2.0: Archives and the Newest Generation of Web Applications," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2009, Vol. 72, No. 1) 

2007:   Elizabeth Snowden (Middle Tennessee State University), "Our Archives, Our Selves: Documentation Strategy and the Re-Appraisal of Professional Identity," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2008, Vol. 71, No. 1) 

2006:  Ben Blake (University of Pittsburgh), "A Call for a New American Labor Archives: History, Theory, Methodology and Practice," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2007, Vol. 70, No. 1) 

2005:  Ian Craig Breaden (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “Sound Practices: Online Audio Exhibits and the Culture Heritage Archive,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2006, Vol. 69, No. 1) 

2004:  Catherine O'Sullivan (New York University), "Diaries, Online Diaries, and the Future Loss to Archives; or Blogs and the Blogging Bloggers Who Blog Them," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2003, Vol. 68, No. 1) 

2003:  Glenn Dingwall (University of British Columbia), "Trusting Archivists: The Role of Archival Ethics Codes in Establishing Public Faith,” The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2004, Vol. 67, No. 1) 

2002:  Reto Tschan (University of British Columbia), "A Comparison of Jenkinson and Schellenberg on Appraisal,” The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2002, Vol. 65, No. 2) 

2001:  James M. Roth (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "Serving Up EAD: An Exploratory Study on the Deployment and Utilization of Encoded Archival Description Finding Aids," The American Archivist (Fall/Winter 2001, Vol. 64, No. 2) 

2000:  Kristin E. Martin (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "Analysis of Remote Reference Correspondence at a Large Academic Manuscripts Collection," The American Archivist (Spring/Summer 2001, Vol. 64, No. 1) 

1999:  Kathleen Feeney (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "Retrieval of Archival Finding Aids Using World Wide Web Search Engines," The American Archivist (Fall 1999, Vol. 62, No. 2) 

1998:  Not awarded  

1997:  Karen Collins (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), "Providing Subject Access to Images: A Study of User Queries," The American Archivist (Spring 1998, Vol. 61, No. 1) 

1996:  Shauna McRanor (University of British Columbia), "A Critical Analysis of Intrinsic Value," The American Archivist (Fall 1996, Vol. 59, No. 4)  

1995:  Judith Panitch (State University of New York at Albany), "Liberty, Equality, Posterity?: Some Archival Lessons from the Case of the French Revolution," The American Archivist (Winter 1996, Vol. 59, No. 1) 

1994:  Anke Voss-Hubbard (State University of New York at Albany), "No Documents--No History: Mary Ritter Beard and the Early History of Women's Archives," The American Archivist (Winter 1995, Vol. 58, No. 2) 

1993:  Not awarded 

1992:   Roy Schaeffer (University of British Columbia), "Transcendent Concepts: Power, Appraisal, and the Archivist as Social Context," The American Archivist (Fall 1991, Vol. 55, No 4) 

1991:  Not awarded 

1990:  Luke J. Gilliland-Swetland (University of Michigan), "The Provenance of a Profession: The Permanence of the Public Archives and Historical Manuscripts Traditions in American Archival History," The American Archivist (Spring 1991, Vol. 54, No. 2) 

1989:  Maureen A. Jung (California State University, Sacramento), "Documenting 19th-Century Quartz Mining in Northern California," The American Archivist (Summer 1990, Vol. 53, No. 3) 

1988:  Greg Kinney (University of Michigan), "The Records of Land District Offices of the U.S. General Land Office for the States of the Northwest Territory," The American Archivist (Spring 1989, Vol. 52, No. 2) 

 

Waldo Gifford Leland Award

Purpose and Criteria for Selection:

Created in 1959, this prize encourages and rewards writing of superior excellence and usefulness in the field of archival history, theory, or practice.

Eligibility:

The author(s) of a monograph, finding aid, or documentary publication published in English during the previous calendar year. Periodicals are not eligible.

Submission Requirements:

A completed nomination form and the required number of copies of the publication.

Sponsor and Funding:

The Society of American Archivists Foundation, in honor of Waldo Gifford Leland, who authored the landmark Guide to the Archives of the Government of the United States in Washington (1904); was active in the organization of the Conference of Archivists in 1909; played a central role in the establishment of the U.S. National Archives; and served two terms as SAA President during the 1940s.

Prize:

A certificate and cash prize of $1,000.

First Awarded:

1959

Selection Committee:

The Leland Award Subcommittee of the SAA Awards Committee consists of three members of the Society of American Archivists and one of the co-chairs of the Awards Committee (ex officio). One member of the subcommittee shall be appointed each year by the SAA President-elect for a term of three years. The senior member of the subcommittee in years of service shall serve as its chair.

Application Deadline and Nomination Form:

All nominations shall be submitted to SAA by February 28 of each year.  CLICK HERE to download the application form.


Waldo Gifford Leland Award Recipients:

1959:   Theodore R. Schellenberg, Manual C. Stampa

1960:   Julian P. Boyd

1961:   Oliver W. Holmes

1962:   Philip M. Hamer

1963:   Kenneth W. Munden, Henry P. Beers

1964:   Morris L. Radoff, Phebe R. Jacobsen

1965:   Ernst Posner

1966:   Edward E. Hill

1967:   H.G. Jones

1968:   Andrew Oliver

1969:   Henry P. Beers

1970:   Edgar B. Nixon

1971:   Walter Rundell, Jr.

1972:   Martin Schmitt

1973:   Ernst Posner, Patricia Kennedy Grimsted

1974:   Peter Walne, David Iredale

1975:   Not awarded

1976:   Kenneth W. Duckett

1977:   Not awarded

1978:   Richard C. Davis

1979:   Ronald R. McCoy

1980:   Harold C. Syrett

1981:   H.G. Jones

1982:   Edward E. Hill

1983:   James M. O'Toole, Lucy F. West

1984:   Richard C. Berner

1985:   John Fleckner

1986:   John Barton, Johanna Wellheiser

1987:   Frederick J. Stielow

1988:   Nancy E. Gwinn

1990:   Henry P. Beers

1991:   Richard J. Cox, Marie B. Allen, and Michael Miller

1992:   Thomas Wilsted, William M. Nolte

1993:   Helen W. Samuels; Certificate of Commendation: Charles Dollar

1994:   F. Gerald Ham

1995:   Joan D. Krizack

1996:   Charles H. Lesser

1997:   Anne Kenney, Stephan Chapman

1998:   The Records of American Business, edited by James. M. O'Toole

1999:   Not awarded

2000:   Charles Dollar; Certificate of Commendation: Patricia Kennedy Grimsted

2001:   Anne R. Kenney, Oya Y. Rieger

2002:   Richard J. Cox

2003:   Joan Echtenkamp Klein

2004:   Gregory S. Hunter

2005:   Richard J. Cox

2006:   Mary Jo Pugh

2007:   Waverly Lowell, Tawny Ryan Nelb

2008:   Deidre Simmons

2009:   Philip C. Bantin

2010:   Karen D.  Paul, Glenn R. Gray, L. Rebecca Johnson Melvin

2011:   Dr. Laura A. Millar

2012:   Francis X. Blouin Jr., William G. Rosenberg

2013:   Astrid M. Eckert, The Struggle for the Files: The Western Allies and the Return of German Archives after the Second World War (Cambridge University Press, 2012)

2014:   Ellen Gruber Garvey, Writing with Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance (Oxford University Press, 2013)

2015:   Michelle Caswell, Archiving the Unspeakable: Silence, Memory, and the Photographic Record in Cambodia

2016:   Sonja Luehrmann, Religion in Secular Archives: Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge (Oxford University Press) 

Section XIII: Student Chapters

A. Mission Statement

Graduate student chapters of the Society of American Archivists:

  1. Serve as a means of introducing new archivists into the profession.
  2. Enhance the educational function by providing an additional focus for the students to discuss archival issues, identify with the profession, and engage in professional activities.
  3. Promote communication among student members and with other members of the Society.
  4. Develop the leaders of tomorrow's archival profession.
  5. Attract new members into SAA.

B. Goals and Areas of Activity

Student chapters are encouraged to broaden their understanding of archival issues, archival education, and the archives profession by:

  1. Inviting guest archival educators and others with relevant knowledge, expertise, and experience from both within and outside the institution to discuss theoretical perspectives, practical experiences, and/or research initiatives.
  2. Organizing visits to area repositories.
  3. Eliciting reports from fellow students who have attended regional and national archives conferences or have participated in research initiatives.
  4. Encouraging professional activities among members.
  5. Developing and encouraging interaction with other student groups to promote mutual interests of allied professions.
  6. Acquainting members with SAA’s goals, policies, and programs.
  7. Promoting archival interests within their universities and academic departments by, for example,  planning colloquia or serving on curriculum committees.

C. Establishing a Student Chapter

  1. The SAA Council approves the establishment of new student chapters.
  2. Membership:
    1. All members of an SAA student chapter must also be individual members of SAA.
    2. The minimum number of members required to form and maintain a student chapter is five.
  3. A student chapter seeking recognition from SAA must submit the following information to the SAA office at least thirty days before the Council meeting at which the request will be considered:
    1. The organizing document (e.g., bylaws) that describes the proposed chapter’s purpose, goals, and areas of activity; specifies the requirement that all members must also be members of SAA; and describes the process for election of officers and appointments. Examples made available upon request.
    2. A list of SAA members, including contact information, enrolled as students at the institution who wish to form a student chapter and identification of the initial officers.
    3. A copy of the letter of recognition from the academic institution in which the chapter is located granting the student chapter official recognition as a student organization.
    4. A letter from the faculty advisor, who must be an individual member of SAA and either an archival educator or an archivist within the parent institution and who has indicated willingness to work with the student chapter.

D. Governance

  1. Organizing document: Student chapters may design an organizing document as best suits their own needs, but which in all cases meets the requirements of their own academic institution and the SAA guidelines for student chapters.
  2. Internal leadership:
    1. Once approved by the SAA Council, a student chapter must have an elected leadership to consist, at a minimum, of a chapter chief officer who acts as the liaison between the chapter and the SAA office.
    2. Chapter chief officer(s) will be elected and will take office as outlined in the organizing document of that student chapter. They will notify the SAA office within thirty days following the election.
    3. The faculty advisor, who is also an SAA individual member, will assist the chapter in electing leaders, drafting an organizing  document, in its relations with the SAA Council and office, and in planning local programs for the student chapter.
  3. An SAA staff member will serve as liaison to student chapters.

E. Annual Reporting Requirements

  1. Each student chapter must submit an annual report to the SAA office and include:
    1. The names of all members of the student chapter;
    2. The names and email addresses of the chief officer(s) and the faculty advisor; and
    3. A summary of chapter activities.
  2. Annual reports are due to the SAA office on one of two due dates to be chosen by each chapter: December 31 or May 31. Each chapter must submit a report at least once every twelve months.
  3. Failure to produce an annual report will initiate an inquiry, through the faculty advisor and the chapter chief officer(s), into dissolution of the student chapter.

F. Communications

  1. All student chapter members are encouraged to subscribe to SAA’s student electronic discussion list.  The chief officer(s) and the faculty advisor must subscribe to SAA's student discussion list as a means to ensure that important messages from the SAA office reach student chapter members.
  2. The chief officer of each chapter is expected to forward any messages from the SAA office to all members of the chapter. He or she also is encouraged to forward other messages of interest to chapter members.
  3. Student chapter chief officer(s) or other designated chapter officers are responsible for maintaining mailing lists, for the content and accuracy of mailings, and for distribution of all chapter communications.

G. Funding for Student Chapter Activities

  1. Student chapters may solicit resources (in cash or in kind) from sources within their academic institutions. SAA student chapters must follow all regulations of their own institutions regarding fundraising by student organizations.
  2. Although the SAA Council strongly encourages student chapters to find creative ways to fund their activities, there may be times when one chapter or a consortium of chapters may wish to propose a project that warrants consideration by the Council for SAA funding due to its potential benefits across the association.  In those circumstances, the Council may include in its annual budget an appropriation for this purpose. Funds allocated by SAA during one SAA fiscal year are not carried over to the next fiscal year. If an allocation must be deferred to the next fiscal year, a formal request must be made to provide funding in the next fiscal year.
  3. SAA's fiscal year extends from July 1 to June 30. Funding requests from student chapters must be submitted by January 1 of each year to be provisionally reviewed at the winter Council meeting before the budget meeting in June. The deadline will be strictly adhered to; budget requests received after the deadline will not be considered.
  4. Student chapter chief officers will be informed of SAA appropriations and will submit requests for reimbursement, together with receipts for all expenditures, to the SAA office.

H. Term of the Student Chapter

A student chapter whose membership falls below five individual members of SAA (whether at the student membership level or otherwise) or that fails to submit an annual report will be contacted by the staff liaison. The executive director will then make a recommendation to the Council regarding the continuation of the student chapter.

I. Use of SAA Name, Logo, and Auspices

The use of SAA’s name, logo, and auspices for publications, meetings, mailings, websites, social networks, electronic communications, and other activities is available only through specific provision of the Council and will conform to Uniform Guidelines for Use of the SAA Logo. Student chapters, although they are within the SAA structure, are not empowered to take action in the name of SAA, or request money in the name of SAA or the student chapter itself, without specific prior authorization of the Council. This firm rule is required to protect SAA and its members from potential legal complications.

Approved by Council: June 1993
Revised: February 2004, October 2010, July 2013

Section XIV: Working Groups

A. Purpose

  1. Working groups of the Council may be created by the Council as it determines a need for a standing body of experts in a particular issue area. Working groups differ from standing committees in that 1) they are populated with acknowledged experts in a given topic area and 2) their members may be reappointed indefinitely so that their expertise remains available to the Council. Working groups differ from task forces in that their charge is ongoing and not (necessarily) time-limited. Working Groups are advisory to the Council and may be created and disbanded by the Council as appropriate.
  2. Working groups are responsible for the following:
    1. Responding in a timely fashion to requests from the Council for background information and recommendations on matters relating to the group’s area of expertise.
    2. Scanning the environment and tracking issues that may be of interest or concern to archivists, and recommending (either proactively or in response to a query from the Council) whether SAA should respond to an issue.
    3. Preparing drafts (for Executive Committee or Council approval) of background or position papers, statements, and/or other documents relating to the group’s issue(s) area.
    4. Contributing to the education of SAA members and staff on the set of issues assigned to them.
    5. Bringing to the Council’s attention areas in which collaboration with other organizations may advance SAA’s efforts related to the set of issues assigned to them.
  3. Working groups may have short-term and mid-term measurable tasks and assignments; they always have a long-term advisory role.

B. Membership

  1. Working groups are composed of acknowledged experts in the issue areas assigned to them. In recognition that the type of expertise needed on a working group may be in short supply, there is no set term length for participation; members serve at the pleasure of the SAA Council. Nonmembers of SAA may be appointed, based on their expertise.
  2. Working groups have no fixed size. The Council may adjust membership according to the availability of expertise and the group’s anticipated workload. The vice president/president-elect, on behalf of the Council and with the recommendation of the working group, makes new appointments and terminates appointments, including those of the chair(s), as needed.
  3. Unlike other positions within SAA, there is no prohibition against a member of the Council serving on a working group. Sitting members of Council do not typically serve as chair of a working group unless a compelling reason exists for them to do so.
  4. To encourage participation in the work of a working group by those who seek to gain expertise in that area, interns may be appointed to working groups. Interns, who are appointed by the vice president/president-elect in consultation with the chair, serve as nonvoting members for a term of one year and are expected to attend the SAA Annual Meeting and assist in the work of the group throughout the year.
  5. The process for the removal of a non-participating working group member is specified in the Policy for Removing a Non-Participating Member from a Council-Appointed Group.

C. Consultation and Reporting

  1. Working groups work closely with their Council liaisons and the executive director to ensure that they are responsive to the needs of the Council. In certain cases, when time is of the essence, working groups may communicate directly with the Executive Committee.
  2. Working groups, like all SAA groups, are required to present an annual report for review by the Council. The chair is responsible for coordinating the submission of an annual report, which must be filed with the SAA executive director within ninety days of the close of the Annual Meeting. Annual reports must use the Council Report Template. The annual report should be a brief summary of the working group’s activities in the preceding year and may raise issues or questions about which the working group desires Council feedback.

D. Meetings and External Resources

  1. Working groups typically meet in person at the Annual Meeting. The chair prepares and distributes in advance an agenda for the meeting. Working group chairs request space (on a timetable established and publicized by the executive director) for an  in-person meeting at the conference hotel, travel and accommodations for which are the responsibility of working group members.
  2. The standard expectation is that the a working group’s work outside of the annual meeting will be done utilizing emails, conference calls (supported by the SAA office) and free tools. SAA support for in-person mid-year meetings of working groups is severely restricted due to the limited availability of financial resources. Working group chairs should discuss requests for such funding with their Council liaison and the executive director.
  3. If a working group wishes to seek resources (whether cash or in kind) from any source outside SAA, Executive Committee approval must be obtained in every instance before approaching the source. Proposals should be routed through the executive director and Council liaison, with sufficient time for consideration by the Executive Committee, which will respond within thirty days.

Adopted by the Council: January 2012
Revised: July 2013

CoSA/NAGARA/SAA Joint Working Group on Issues and Awareness (Affiliated Group)

I. Purpose

The Joint Working Group coordinates efforts and initiatives of the Council of State Archivists, the National Association of Government Archives and Records Administrators, and the Society of American Archivists in areas of common concern and action, including: 1) coordinating action to address public policy and legislative concerns for the archives profession, 2) cooperating on efforts to raise awareness of the value of archives, and 3) coordinating strategies for the preservation of and access to archival records throughout the United States, its territories, and the District of Columbia.

II. Size, Composition, Selection, and Length of Terms

The Joint Working Group consists of six members. Each organization selects two members to serve on the Joint Working Group for a period of two years; the terms of SAA representatives are renewable and staggered to provide continuity. The SAA Vice President appoints the SAA representatives, generally one individual serving on the SAA Committee on Advocacy and Public Policy and recommended by the chair of that committee and one individual serving on the SAA Committee on Public Awareness and recommended by the chair of that committee.

The Joint Working Group determines its chair or shared method of leadership.

III. Reporting

Joint Working Group members are responsible for reporting to their leadership group according to the standards of each organization.

SAA representatives prepare a report – or work with Working Group members to provide a group report – for each meeting of the SAA Council and also prepare an annual report for the Council’s information.  The SAA representatives also share information on an ongoing basis with the two committees that they represent to ensure coordination and collaboration.

IV. Duties and Responsibilities

The Joint Working Group creates an annual action plan that identifies tactics, communication with respective boards, and development of broad networks of allied organizations. The plan is approved annually by the boards of the three organizations. 

The Joint Working Group focuses on issues, trends, and positions in the following areas:

  • Ongoing issues, such as existing federal programs, budgets, and strategic initiatives (NARA, NHPRC, NEH, IMLS, etc); federal budget implications; and federal legislation and regulation implications.
  • Federal block grant funding for archives.
  • Standards and practice for records access, preservation, and management; transparency; and ethics.
  • State and local legislation and budget issues (such as threats to core programs, institution closures, funding for initiatives to improve access to records, ethical breaches).

The Joint Working Group may also initiate and support ongoing conversations about the future of the field.

V. Meetings

The Joint Working Group determines an appropriate meeting schedule to complete its annual plan. Funding for conference calls is supported equally by the three organizations. Other funding for in-person meetings or products and initiatives of the Joint Working Group is determined collaboratively by the leaders of the three organizations.

Adopted by the SAA Council: October 2014

Cultural Heritage Working Group

The Cultural Heritage Working Group will take the lead in fostering discussion, clarifying issues, and investigating a range of alternative approaches to managing, preserving, and providing access to cultural property, given the rights and responsibilities of cultural groups and stakeholders and archivists' interest in providing equal and open access to all. This group will

  • Advise the SAA Council, officers, staff, and members concerning cultural property and cultural sensitivity issues;
  • Prepare draft statements for SAA to issue;
  • Develop positions for SAA concerning cultural property and cultural sensitivity issues;
  • Represent SAA on cultural property and cultural sensitivity issues at meetings and in professional discussions; and
  • Communicate and collaborate with all relevant SAA and external (ALA, AAM, etc.) groups.

The group will submit a work plan with specific activities, outcomes, and timelines for the Council's review and approval at its May 2010 meeting.

The establishment of the Cultural Heritage Working Group represents the beginning of SAA's attempts to open a professional, national, and international discussion regarding the presence of cultural material in repositories. Some challenges in establishing the best practices for the culturally responsive care and use of Native American archival materials are illustrated in a specific discussion of Protocols for Native American Archival Materials. This Working Group broadens the discussion to include other repositories, professions, and cultures that face similar challenges when establishing best practices.

Adopted by the SAA Council: August 10, 2009
Revised: January 2013 

Dictionary Working Group

The Dictionary Working Group maintains and updates Dictionary of Archives Terminology, which has its basis in A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology (SAA, 2005).

I. Purpose:

The Working Group's purpose is to establish and maintain mechanisms and procedures for allowing periodic updates and contributions of new content to the Dictionary and to ensure that this important resource adheres to the highest quality professional standards.

II. Working Group Selection, Size, and Length of Term

The Working Group consists of nine members, including one representative from the Publications Board. Working Group members serve staggered four-year terms with the possibility of reappointment. The Vice President, on behalf of the Council and with the recommendation of the Working Group, makes new appointments and appoints the chair.

III. Duties and Responsibilities:

The Working Group has the following duties and responsibilities:

  • Develop and implement effective mechanisms and procedures for soliciting contributions of new content to the Dictionary.
  • Develop and implement effective mechanisms and procedures to ensure periodic review and update of Dictionary content as appropriate.
  • Vet content for accuracy and consistency before addition to the Dictionary.

IV. Reporting:

The Working Group reports to the Council annually and upon request.

Adopted by the SAA Council: August 22, 2011
Revised: August 2012, January 2014

Intellectual Property Working Group

The Working Group on Intellectual Property was created as a working group of the Council in May 2001. Intellectual property issues are complex and require a special expertise. They often require a very quick response, such as when SAA is asked to join litigation or respond to draft legislation. The Working Group's purpose is to make sure that timely expertise is readily available to the Council. The Working Group responds to requests for assistance from the Council, tracks intellectual property issues of concern to archivists, and drafts for Council approval responses or position papers as needed.

Working Group Size, Selection and Length of Term:

There is no fixed size to the Working Group. In response to requests from the Working Group, the Council adjusts membership according to the availability of expertise and the anticipated workload of the group. The Vice President, on behalf of the Council and with the recommendation of the Working Group, makes new appointments. There is no prohibition against a member of the Council serving on the Working Group.

In recognition that the type of expertise needed on the Working Group is in short supply in the Society, there is no set length of term for participation; members serve at the pleasure of the Council.

Duties and Responsibilities:

The Working Group has the following duties and responsibilities:

  • Respond in a timely fashion to requests from the Council for background information and recommendations on matters relating to intellectual property.
  • In order to be able to respond in a knowledgeable manner, track intellectual property issues that could be of concern to archivists.
  • Prepare drafts for Council approval of possible position papers, statements, and other documents relating to intellectual property.
  • Contribute to the further education of SAA members and staff in intellectual property matters.
  • Bring to the attention of the Council possible areas of fruitful collaboration with other organizations that are interested in intellectual property and, under Council direction or with its approval, cooperate with such organizations in furthering SAA's interests.

Reporting:

The Working Group works closely with its Council Liaison and the Executive Director in order to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of the Council. In certain cases, when time is of the essence, the Working Group communicates directly with the Executive Committee.

Adopted by the SAA Executive Committee: September 29, 2006

Appendix A. Current SAA Policies and Procedures

Annual Meeting Audio and Video Recording Policy

The following are criteria considered for the selection of annual meeting sessions to be taped. These criteria are applied by the Executive Director in consultation with the Program Committee:

  1. Session Attendance: The higher the projected attendance, the more likely the session content will be in demand and therefore recorded. Anticipated attendance is projected by the Program Committee and staff based on past experience and is measured through the Annual Meeting attendance sheets. 
  2. Session Topic: The broader the topic appeal the more likely it contains widespread appeal and therefore will be recorded.
  3. Special Session: The presentation by a prominent speaker and/or of a special topic.
  4. Accommodate Attendees with Disabilities: The recording of sessions by attendees with disabilities is considered to be a reasonable accommodation. A session presenter makes oral presentations in various formats and for attendees who find it difficult to handwrite notes or make notations in a personal laptop computer, recording of oral or visual presentations is an allowable reasonable alternative.
  5. Presenter Permission: All sessions for which unanimous presenter permission exists will be recorded. SAA will present notices to all session chairs and speakers stating that their participation in the session implies consent to be recorded.  The notice will contain an “opt-out” form with which any chair or presenter can notify SAA that s/he does not wish to be recorded.  SAA will not record any chair or presenter who has opted out.

 

Approved by the Council: June 14, 1996
Revised: February 2008; May 2016

Archives and Archivists (A&A) Discussion List Terms of Participation

The Archives and Archivists (A&A) Discussion List was established in 1989 by Donna Harlan and John Harlan as an open forum for all topics relating to archival theory and practice. Over the years, A&A has had various homes. In late 1993, the list migrated to Miami University. (To view the old list archives, see http://www.ibiblio.org/archives-archivists/.) In 1998, SAA assumed sponsorship of the list as a service to the archives profession. It remained hosted at Miami University under the stewardship of Robert M. Schmidt until September 2006, at which time SAA assumed full ownership of the list and responsibility for its ongoing maintenance.

 The A&A List is an open forum for all topics relating to archival theory and practice. The list is open to all individuals with an interest in the archives profession, archival practice, and the preservation and promotion of archival materials. 

Click here to view the list Terms of Participation and subscription instructions.

 

Revised and approved by the SAA Council, August 1, 2006. Revised August 10, 2009; May 16, 2013; August 12, 2014; August 17, 2015.

Childcare Services for Registrants at SAA Annual Meetings

Upon request, SAA will put Annual Meeting registrants in contact with child care sevice providers. SAA will subsidize the cost for child care and will plan an appropriate amount in each year's Annual Meeting budget.

The meeting registration material should clearly indicate that a small portion of each registration fee is used to cover the costs of childcare services, pursuant to actions of the 1984 business meeting and January 1985 and 1993 Council meetings.

Adopted by the Council: January 1993
Revised: February 2008 

Equal Opportunity/Non-Discrimination Policy

The Society of American Archivists is a professional organization established to serve the educational and informational needs of its members. SAA promotes cooperation, research, standards, public awareness, and relations with allied professions and thereby advances the identification, preservation, and use of records of enduring value. Because discrimination and unequal treatment are inimical to the Society's goals, SAA hereby declares that discrimination on the grounds of age, color, creed, disability, family relationship, gender identity/expression, individual life style, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status is prohibited within the Society. SAA will vigorously pursue a policy of non-discrimination and equal opportunity through its programs, activities, services, operations, employment, and business contracts.

Adopted by the SAA Council in January 1992; updated February 2009; reviewed and reaffirmed in February 2010 and January 2011, 2012, and 2013. The Council agreed to review every three years this document, SAA's Statement on Diversity (January 2014), and SAA's Code of Conduct (July 2014). Last Reviewed: May 2016.

Guidelines and Procedures for SAA Fundraising and Grant Proposals

SAA members and groups often develop worthy initiatives which deserve, but due to limited financial resources cannot receive, Society funding. As a result, members may periodically wish to approach outside funding sources. On these occasions the Society will work closely and in a collaborative manner with membership to develop strong, well-constructed proposals for submission to granting agencies, foundations or corporate sponsors.

It is important to the success of the Society and the proposal that members, in turn, work closely with SAA leadership to secure appropriate financial and legal review of proposals. On some occasions a formal proposal may not be necessary, but members should always involve the Executive Director before initial approach to funders. To assist members, the SAA has established the following guidelines for formal grant submissions.

  1. Please discuss ideas for grant proposals with the Executive Director early in the planning process, then submit a brief written summary to the Executive Director. Opening the dialogue early in the process will enable members to address any initial major concerns and will forestall any surprises. The summary should include but is not limited to the following:
    • how the proposed plan of work addresses and reflects the major goals of the strategic plan;
    • a brief description of the project purpose, scope, duration, expected outcomes;
    • potential funding sources and, if possible, names of contacts. Although the central office is unable to research potential funders, staff will be able to work with proposers and help direct efforts toward appropriate research sources;
    • a draft budget and budget summary, including fiscal duration, staff involvement, direct and indirect costs, post-project commitments, if any. The Executive Director will be happy to assist in developing the budget.
  2. The Executive Director will work with proposers to address questions or considerations that may arise from the Executive Committee, Council, funding source, or central office. To insure that the proposal incorporates and reflects the full range of substantive knowledge within the Society, the Executive Director will consult with individuals with expertise in the field. Their review will help shape the proposal into the best form for pre-submission review by funding sources. Pre-submission review is common practice in fundraising and substantially increases the likelihood of the proposal's ultimate success.
  3. After concluding the above set of consultations, members should then submit a draft of the full proposal and budget to the SAA office in both paper form and on a floppy disk.
  4. Please note that before the grant can be submitted to the agency or corporate sponsor, the proposal will be reviewed by at least two Council members with knowledge of the technical or subject area of the grant. The Executive Committee will additionally review the proposal for its financial implications. Therefore, once the draft proposal is complete and submitted to SAA, members must schedule at least four weeks for internal review and revisions before the proposal can be submitted to the funding source.
  5. Once these reviews and revisions are incorporated into the final draft, the Executive Director will submit the proposal on behalf of the Society to the granting agency, corporate sponsor, or foundation.

It is the Executive Director's responsibility to keep Council and officers fully informed about grant proposals in development, and will provide Council with a summary of these activities at the Spring and Fall meeting.

 

Adopted by SAA Council: June 1991
Revised: June 1994

Guidelines for Preparation of Briefing Papers on Proposed Constitution and Bylaws Amendments

INTRODUCTION

Amendments to an organization’s constitution and bylaws have a significant potential to alter the organization’s strategic course. Informed decision making by an assembly is important in all matters, but particularly when considering revisions to charter documents. Therefore, Section 11 of SAA’s Bylaws charges the Executive Committee to “review and approve a briefing paper, prepared by the proposer(s) and/or by the Executive Director in accordance with Council guidelines, which shall be presented with the motion(s) at the business meeting or at a special meeting called by the Council.” The purpose of such briefing papers is to assist voting members in understanding the background, rationale, and ramifications of proposed amendments. Briefing papers should present a balanced view of the issue(s) under consideration.

GUIDELINES

Briefing papers on proposed constitutional and bylaws amendments will be attached as exhibits to a motion and will contain supplementary information that facilitates informed deliberation and decision-making.

Authors: The proposer(s) are encouraged to submit a draft briefing paper upon filing a motion with the Executive Director. The executive office will provide information and other assistance as needed, provided that the requisite number of eligible voting members, as specified in the Constitution, have signed on to the motion. If a briefing paper is not submitted or if the briefing paper is incomplete, the Executive Committee will charge the Executive Director to prepare one, in whole or in part. In doing so, the Executive Director will make reasonable efforts to solicit and incorporate input from the proposer(s), who will be entitled to review and submit comments to inform the Executive Committee’s review.

Content: The briefing paper should contain the following sections:

  1. Motion: The main motion is the means by which a substantive proposal may be presented to the members for consideration and action. It should be concise, clear, and stated in the affirmative. In the case of constitutional and bylaws amendments, the motion typically is phrased, “THAT the SAA Constitution/Bylaws be amended as follows,” followed by the verbatim language of the revisions, marked with strikethroughs for deletions and underlining for additions.

Support Statement: A summary of the findings presented in the Discussion/Analysis section. The support statement briefly articulates the rationale for the motion. Generally the Support Statement “travels with” the adopted motion in minutes and elsewhere and serves to explain the rationale for the action taken.

Proposed By: The names of the proposer and seconder. In the case of an amendment proposed by a group of members, primary and secondary contacts should be identified to enable communication among the proposers, the Executive Committee, and the Executive Director. A complete list of petitioners may be attached as an appendix.

Background: A brief description of prior events and/or discussions that helps explain why the motion is being presented. What problem will it solve? What issue will it resolve?

Discussion/Analysis: A detailed discussion/analysis that presents a fair and balanced review of the “pros” and “cons” of adoption of the motion. If applicable, some or all of the following questions should be addressed:
  1. Is the proposal consistent with SAA’s strategic objectives, as articulated in Article II of the Constitution?
  2. Is the proposal consistent with SAA’s legal and financial interests?
  3. Does the proposal benefit SAA’s members as a whole?
  4. Does the proposal correct an error or omission or add clarification to existing policies?

Criteria for Review: The Executive Committee will assess the briefing paper on its clarity and capacity to inform voter deliberation and will provide feedback to the proposer and/or Executive Director.

Approved by the SAA Council: January 2012.
Revised: May 2016 

Guidelines for Use of the SAA Logo

SAA component groups (i.e., boards, committees, subcommittees, task forces, working groups, sections, roundtables, and student chapters) are required to display the approved SAA logo on all materials pertaining to official SAA business, including newsletters, websites, social networks, posters, and other promotional materials. This should be accompanied by an appropriate disclaimer (below) regarding the responsibilities of SAA and other sponsoring institutions or organizations for the opinions and views expressed in the documents and/or events in question.

Disclaimer: Use of the SAA logo by an SAA component group does not necessarily imply SAA endorsement of the groups' statements, positions, or opinions.

Vendors, consultants, and for-profit commercial entities, including institutional members, may not use the SAA logo without obtaining prior written permission from SAA's Executive Director.

The Executive Office is responsible for the design and provision of the SAA logo.

Revised:  February 2010; May 2016

Investment Policy

Background

In 2001, the Society of American Archivists’ independent auditors pointed out the need for a formal investment policy. Both legally and ethically, the SAA Council must provide prudent oversight of the Society’s investments. This written investment policy is intended to address those concerns, and its existence will help protect SAA from liability should the Society’s investments be mismanaged. The guidelines provided in the initial investment policy included the following:

  • Maintain adequate working funds to satisfy fluctuating needs for cash during the year;
  • Provide access to funds to help cover a possible budget deficit in any given year;
  • Provide for real growth of capital: cover inflation rate plus modest increase in capital;
  • Preserve the principal; place an amount equivalent to any federal grant funds in insured funds; and
  • Seek as high a level of current income as is prudent.

Preamble

The SAA Council is responsible for the fiduciary management of the Society. The following investment objectives and directions are to be judged and understood in light of that overall sense of stewardship.

Delegation

The SAA Council has delegated supervisory authority over its financial affairs to the Society's Finance Committee. Among its several tasks, the Finance Committee is responsible for reporting regularly to the Council on the status of SAA's investments. In carrying out its responsibilities, the Finance Committee and its agents will act in accordance with this Investment Policy and all applicable laws and regulations. The SAA Council reserves to itself the exclusive right to revise the Policy.

The SAA Council and its Finance Committee are authorized to retain one or more Financial Consultant(s) to assume the investment management of funds and assets owned or administered by SAA. In discharging this authority, the Finance Committee can act in the place of Council and may receive reports from, pay compensation to, and enter into agreements with such Financial Consultant(s). The Council may also grant exceptions to the Investment Policy when appropriate. The Finance Committee will maintain regular contact with teh Financial Consultant(s) and any investment brokers primarily through the Director of Finance and Administration, the Executive Director, or the Treasurer, all of whom are members of the Committee.

The SAA Council has established the Finance Committee to, among other responsibilities, provide oversight of SAA’s investment program, including reviewing specific quantified income needs that are adequate to cover projected fund expenses, investment administrative fees, management performance, a three-year review schedule for the SAA Investment Policy and program, and all other areas that are related and appropriate to SAA investments. The Finance Committee will receive copies of all periodic financial reports. (See Finance Committee.)

Objectives

The Society’s primary investment objective is to earn a positive total return on its investments that meets or exceeds the S&P 500. The computed total return considers dividends, interest, and realized and unrealized capital gains and it factors in capital losses and investment expenses. The Investment Policy and portfolio is reviewed by the Finance Committee and Financial Consultant(s) every three years to ensure its compliance with SAA's risk tolerance, liquidity needs, and investment objectives. This review cycle will begin in FY 2010.

Asset Mix

To accomplish the Society's investment objectives, the Financial Consultant(s) are authorized to utilize portfolios of equity securities (common stocks and convertible securities), fixed-income securities, and short-term (cash) investments. As a guide to accomplishing these objectives, the Financial Consultants shall remain within the following ranges:

Operating Expenses: SAA's operating funds will be managed for liquidity and preservation of principle. No more than 50% of SAA's operating funds are to be invested in fixed-income securities (such as U.S. and corporate funds or prime rate funds), with the remaining funds kept in cash and equivalents (such as money market funds and CDs).

Long-Term Investments: SAA's endowment and reserve funds (including the Awards Funds, Endowment Funds, Publications Funds and Deferred Income Fund) are to be managed with a longer time horizon in mind (between three to five years). Thus, 40% to 60% of these funds should be invested in equity securities (such as stocks or stock mutual funds), 25% to 50% should be invested in fixed-income securities or bond mutual funds, and 5% to 20% should be invested in cash and equivalents.

The Finance Committee can modify these ranges from time to time with the Council's approval. The actual investment targets shall be set within those limits by the Financial Consultant(s) in conjunction with SAA's designated financial officer.

Asset Standards

Common stocks: The Financial Consultant(s) responsible for managing the funds for SAA's endowed and reserve funds may invest in any unrestricted, publicly traded common stock that is listed on a major exchange or a national, over-the-counter market that is appropriate for the portfolio objectives, asset class, and/or investment style defined in this policy. This investment can be in the form of direct investment in the stock market, or indirect investment via mutual funds. Mutual funds should be considered where they offer additional portfolio diversification; lower purchase, maintenance, and sale costs; and good potential gain.

Convertible preferred stock and convertible bonds: The Financial Consultant(s) may use convertible preferred stocks and bonds as equity investments. The quality rating of convertible preferred stock and convertible bonds generally should be BBB or better (as rated by Standard & Poor's) or Baa or better (as rated by Moody's). The common stock into which both may be converted must satisfy the standard specified for common stocks.

Fixed-income securities: The quality rating of bonds and notes must be investment grade (BBB or better, as rated by Standard & Poor's or Moody's). Bonds and notes within a bond mutual fund must, on average, be investment grade (BBB or better, as rated by Standard & Poor's or Moody's). The portfolio may consist of only traditional principal and interest obligations (no derivatives) with maturities of seven years or less, or bond funds with average maturities of seven years or less.

Prime rate funds: Any investments in prime rate funds should include a 90-day liquidity.

Cash/cash equivalents: The quality rating of commercial paper must be A-1 (as rated by Standard & Poor's), P-1 (as rated by Moody's), or better. The assets of any money market mutual funds must comply with this standard and/or the quality provisions for fixed-income securities.

Asset Diversification

As a general policy, the Financial Consultant(s) will maintain a reasonable diversification at all times. The Financial Consultant(s) responsible for long-term investments may not allow the investments in the equity securities of any one company to exceed 5% of the portfolio nor the total securities position (debt and equity) in any one company to exceed 10% of the portfolio. The Financial Consultant(s) shall also maintain reasonable sector allocations and diversification. In that regard, no more than 25% of the entire portfolio may be invested in the securities of any one sector.

Custody and Securities Brokerage

The Finance Committee will establish such custodial and brokerage relationships as are necessary for the efficient management of the Society's funds. Whenever the Finance Committee has not designated a brokerage relationship, then the Financial Consultants shall execute transactions wherever they can obtain best price and execution.

Transactions

All purchases of securities will be for cash and there will be no margin transactions, short selling, or commodity transactions.

Reporting Requirements

Monthly: The Financial Consultant(s) will provide the Finance Committee with a monthly written statement containing all pertinent transaction details for SAA's investment portfolio, including:

  • The name and quantity of each security purchased or sold, with the price and transaction date;
  • An analysis for each security of its description, percentage of total portfolio, purchase date, quantity, average cost basis, current market value, unrealized gain or loss, and indicated annual income and yield (%) at market; and
  • An analysis for the entire portfolio of the current asset allocation by investment category (equities, fixed-income securities, and cash reserves).

Periodically: The Financial Consultants shall provide the Finance Committee with detailed information about (1) asset allocation, (2) investment performance, (3) future investment strategies, and (4) any other matters of interest to the finance Committee.

Annually: The Financial Consultant(s) shall provide to the SAA Council an annual summary of all transactions in each fiscal year, together with a report of investment performance for the year and a "snapshot" listing of current investments.

Cash Flow Requirements

SAA will be responsible for advising the Financial Consultant(s) in a timely manner of the Society's cash distribution requirements from any managed account. The Financial Consultant(s) are responsible for providing adequate liquidity to meet SAA's cash flow requirements in accordance with Council's policy.

Adopted by the SAA Council: August 2002; revised August 10, 2009

Liquor Liability Policy

Due to stringent liquor liability laws, no SAA group may provide alcoholic beverages at a Society or group function unless it is served by a contracted facility or caterer that maintains liquor liability insurance. Failure to abide by this policy places SAA at great legal risk.

Approved by Council: June 14, 1996.

Policies Regarding Function Space and SAA Staff Support for Groups that Meet at the SAA Annual Meeting

Policies That Apply to SAA’s Constituent Bodies:  Sections, Roundtables, Committees, Boards, Task Forces, Representatives

A.  Regular Meetings

Shared or dedicated space (see Section and Roundtable guidelines for details of how space is allocated) for the regular annual meetings of these groups is provided by SAA in or near the conference facility.  This space and time is assigned by the SAA staff according to the general schedule of the conference and information received in response to a call for meeting space requests.

The meetings are listed in the Annual Meeting program.

Room set-ups are arranged by the SAA staff.

Hotel contracts invariably require that all food and beverages consumed in meeting room space must be provided by the hotel.  To do otherwise places the Society in violation of its contract.  SAA does not pay for food or beverage breaks for these group meetings.

Should an SAA body want food service or a coffee break in its meeting, the group should request funding in advance according to the procedure and deadline specified in Sections IX and X of the Governance Manual.

B.  Office Hours in the Exhibit Hall

SAA offers booth space in the Exhibit Hall for “Office Hours” for constituent groups that wish to meet with meeting attendees.

The Society arranges for the set up and pays for any decorator fees and booth fees assessed by the conference facility.

Space and time slots are filled as available on a first-come, first-served basis, as requests are received in the SAA office.

C.  Any Other Function or Activity

The Society is legally and financially responsible for the activities of its constituent bodies.  Any SAA group that wishes to hold a function other than its regular meeting and Office Hours is governed by the following:

  • Because Annual Meetings are scheduled far in advance, requests submitted less than six months before the anticipated event may not be able to be considered.
  • Requests for additional meeting room space will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis after all other requirements for space have been fulfilled and before the date specified in the hotel contract for release of unassigned space.
  • All activities of SAA bodies, whether in the conference facility or off-site, will be fully announced in the Annual Meeting Program.
  • All functions of SAA bodies at the Annual Meeting are open to all meeting registrants.
  • For food functions (such as receptions and meals) the SAA office will enter into all contractual agreements and price the function to cover expenses. Tickets will be sold as part of the meeting registration procedure.
  • For functions held outside the conference facility site, the group desiring such a function will work through the SAA office. The SAA office will enter into all contractual agreements for sites, food, and transportation.  Functions will be priced to cover expenses.
  • The SAA Council does not consider the solicitation of resources to support social events at the Annual Meeting to be a priority activity for SAA groups.  SAA groups will not enter into direct competition with the Society as a whole in soliciting funds or other resources.  SAA groups will follow guidelines regarding seeking outside resources and using the SAA name and logo. 

Policies That Apply to Regional, State, and Metropolitan Archival Associations

A.  Office Hours

The Society offers a limited amount of booth space in the Exhibit Hall for “Office Hours” to regional, state, and metropolitan archival associations that wish to meet with meeting attendees.

The Society arranges for the set up and pays any decorator fees and booth fees assessed by the conference facility.

Space and time slots are filled as available on a first-come, first-served basis, as requests are received in the SAA office.

B.  Other Events

A number of associations traditionally hold social events in conjunction with SAA’s Annual Meeting.  SAA is not able to offer space to hold such events.

Upon request, the Society will note such events as “Other Events” in the final print and online program that is distributed to meeting registrants. 

Policies That Apply to Associations of Archivists Other Than Regional, State, or Metropolitan Associations

A. Complimentary Space

Some SAA Annual Meeting attendees are members of other associations of archivists that wish to use this occasion to hold their own gatherings.  Because of the demands on limited space, SAA is unable to offer complimentary space for meetings or social functions to anyone other than its own constituent bodies and grant-funding agencies or organizations.

B.  Events as Part of the SAA Annual Meeting

Groups that wish to hold a reception or meeting at the conference facility as part of the SAA Annual Meeting may be accommodated as follows:

  • Because Annual Meetings are scheduled far in advance, requests submitted less than six months before the anticipated event may not be able to be considered.
  • Requests for space will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis after all other requirements for space have been fulfilled and before the date specified in the hotel contract for release of unassigned space.
  • All such functions will be planned through the SAA office, announced as part of the Annual Meeting, and be open to all meeting registrants.
  • The SAA office will arrange for food and beverage service with the hotel and invoice the sponsor based on the actual final expense.

C.  Other Events

Other groups are free to make their own arrangements for activities or functions at their own expense.  Upon request, the Society will note such activities as “Other Events” in the final print and online program that is distributed to meeting registrants.

Policies That Apply to Agencies or Organizations That Offer Grant Funding to Archivists or Archival Repositories

A. Office Hours

The Society may offer a limited amount of complimentary booth space in the Exhibit Hall for “Office Hours” to grant-funding agencies.

Space and time slots are filled on a first-come, first-served basis as requests are received in the SAA office.

Such agencies or organizations may choose to secure a separate booth for the entire exhibit time by paying the non-profit rate for exhibitors.

B.  Space for Other Functions

Such agencies or organizations may request complimentary space in meeting rooms. Such requests will be honored on a first-come, first-served basis after all of SAA’s own requirements for meeting space have been fulfilled, provided that the requests are made no less that three months before the conference.

Hotel and convention center contracts invariably require that all food and beverages consumed in meeting room space must be provided by the hotel or conference center. To do otherwise places the Society in violation of its contract.  Should a grant-funding agency wish to provide food or beverage service, the SAA office will provide menus and ordering information.  The organization will be billed directly by the hotel or convention center.

Annual Meeting Firms or Organizations That Provide Goods and Services for Fees or Sale

Such groups are welcome to meet with conference attendees by becoming exhibitors and paying the appropriate rates.

Any other functions that such groups wish to hold will be arranged entirely by them at their own expense.  SAA does not publish listings for such events, although it will accept paid advertisements for inclusion in the Program.

Adopted by the SAA Council:  January 1992
Revised:  March 2007; May 2016

Policy for Removing a Non-Participating Member from a Council-Appointed Group

Non-participation by a member of a Council-appointed group (i.e., Boards, Committees, Task Forces, and Working Groups) is defined as missing two consecutive group and/or scheduled conference calls; not taking an active part in the work of the group; or not completing tasks within assigned deadlines.

As a first step, the Chair of a Council-appointed group should reach out to the non-participating individual to try to reach a constructive and collegial solution that will result in the member’s full participation.

If, after this first step, the chair of a Council-appointed group finds that a member is unwilling or unable to fulfill his or her obligations to the group, as described above, the chair may ask in writing for that member's voluntary resignation from the group.

The chair also will provide the SAA President and Executive Director with written notification of that action through the group’s Council liaison.

If there is no response to the call for resignation within one month of the date of the written communication, the chair of the group will notify the SAA President through the group’s Council liaison. The President will contact the member by telephone to notify the individual that she or he is about to be replaced on the group, but will allow the individual the opportunity to respond and explain the situation from her or his perspective. The President will then decide whether to remove the person from the group. If the individual is to be removed, the President will inform her or him of this action by letter, with a copy to the group chair. If deemed necessary, the Vice President/President-Elect will name a replacement to complete the group member's term.

In the case that the chair is unable or unwilling to fulfill his or her obligations, the SAA President will contact the chair to discuss replacement.

Adopted by the SAA Council: July 25, 2013
Revised: May 2016 

Records Retention Policy for SAA and SAA Foundation

Introduction: The SAA Archives and SAA’s Records Retention Policy (RRP)

Section VII of the Constitution of the Society of American Archivists [1] states:

"The records of the Society, of the Council, and other units of the Society shall be preserved by the officers, Councilors, the Executive Director, and unit chairs, and shall be promptly turned over by them to their successors. Noncurrent records shall be appraised by direction of the Council upon recommendation of the Society's archivist, those records of continuing value shall be placed for preservation in the Society's official archives, and the Council shall determine a policy of access to these records."

In 2001, the Society of American Archivists (SAA) designated the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee (UWM) as its official archival home, and named the head of its Archives Department as SAA Archivist. SAA’s archives dating from the Society’s founding in 1936 are described in an online finding aid [2] and open to researchers in the UWM Archives’ reading room. Recognizing that a significant portion of SAA’s current records are now shared via the Society’s website, in 2014 the UWM Archives, with Council’s approval, initiated a web crawling program, still in its early experimental phase, to capture, preserve and provide access to SAA current born-digital permanent records.

SAA’s RRP provides a framework for ensuring the preservation and accessibility of core documentation of the work of the Society’s members, leaders, and staff. It communicates to SAA leaders and members how their records of enduring value will be captured and maintained either by the UWM or by the SAA Office. 

General Policy Statement for Records Retention

Scope: The RRP contains records schedules that identify official SAA records of permanent value and provides direction for their retention and disposition either by the SAA Office or by the SAA Archives. It also identifies non-permanent records that can be kept as long as administratively useful or legally necessary and then destroyed. It applies to records in the existing SAA Archives as well as to current records, and to SAA staff, elected and appointed leaders, component groups, and members.

Retention Period: The RRP in most cases deliberately avoids suggesting specific retention periods for temporary records, as SAA records creators are in the best position to determine how long to keep materials before discarding them. For records scheduled for permanent retention, the SAA Office staff and SAA leaders should work out the best arrangements in collaboration with both the designated records liaison in the SAA Office and the SAA Archivist.

Disposition: The RRP avoids identifying the manner in which records identified for permanent retention will be transferred to the SAA archives. Most permanent records will be harvested by UWM during an annual crawl of the SAA website. In other cases, transfer may be accomplished by shipment of physical records or delivery of electronic records to a file-sharing site, the details of which will be worked out between the SAA Archives and the designated records liaison in the SAA Office.

Revisions, Additions, and Review: The Council delegates to the Executive Committee ongoing authority to review and approve retention and disposition schedules for SAA records on behalf of the Council. Changes to this RRP--discussed by the appropriate SAA leaders, the designated records liaison in the SAA Office, and the SAA Archivist--may be recommended to and approved by the Executive Committee at any time. If ten years have passed from the most recent RRP revision date, or if a determination is made that the general policy statement contained in this RRP requires revision, the Executive Committee will initiate a review of the RRP, to be undertaken, at minimum, by the SAA Archivist, the SAA Office’s designated records liaison, and representative members of the Council.

Roles and Responsibilities

SAA Archivist: Develops records schedules in consultation with the records creators including staff, officers, and component group leaders; works primarily with the SAA Office’s designated records liaison. The responsibilities and authority of the SAA Archivist are defined in the 2001 agreement between SAA and UWM and include appraisal, processing, preservation and outreach.

Designated Records Liaison: A member of the SAA staff who serves as the point person for managing the records of the SAA Office, communicating with the SAA Archivist, referring questions to the Archives, and facilitating transfer of records to the SAA Archives as indicated by the records schedule.

Society of American Archivists Records Schedules (download all schedules below)

  • Annual Meeting
  • Council-Appointed Component Groups and External Representatives 
  • Member-Affiliation Component Groups 
  • Council, Executive Committee, Elected Officers and Nominating Committee 
  • Education 
  • Executive Director 
  • Finance 
  • General SAA Office 
  • Member Services 
  • Publications and Communications 

Society of American Archivists Foundation Schedule (download all schedules below)

  • SAA Foundation General Records 

[1] http://www2.archivists.org/governance/handbook/section1/constitution

[2] http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/wiarchives.uw-mil-uwmmss0172

 

Adopted by the SAA Council: May 2014

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SAA Fundraising Policy

Requesting Funds from Within SAA

Money is allocated for Section/Roundtable activities through the regular SAA budget process. Sections/Roundtables are not authorized to spend any monies or commit any monies to be spent without specific authorization from the SAA Executive Committee through the budget process or through special approval. Funding from within SAA is requested through annual reports which should be submitted by Section/Roundtable chairs by December 31 of each year. The budget for the following fiscal year (July 1 - June 30) is approved by the Council in May. Throughout the year, special approval for funding from within SAA may be obtained by submitting a request in writing to the SAA Executive Director at least sixty (60) days prior to the next Council meeting.

Solicitation of Funds or In-Kind Contributions from Outside Sources

If a Section/Roundtable wishes to seek resources (whether in case or in-kind) from any source outside SAA, Executive Committee approval must be obtained in every instance before approaching the source or before the transaction takes place. When approaching outside sources, the Section/Roundtable should keep in mind that, according to legal counsel, "to the extent that any monies are deducted by donors on their taxes, they are presumably deductible as business deductions and not charitable deductions." This holds true unless that donation is made to a special project fund.

Sections/Roundtables, although within the SAA structure, are not empowered to take action in the name of SAA, or to request money in the name of SAA or of the Section/Roundtable itself, without specific authorization of the Executive Committee. Under no circumstance should a Section/Roundtable maintain a separate bank account. This firm rule is required to protect SAA and its members from potential legal complications.

Use of SAA Name, Logo and Auspices

The use of SAA’s name, logo, and auspices for publications, meetings, mailings, websites, social networks, electronic communications, and other activities is available only through specific provision of the Council and shall conform to Uniform Guidelines for Use of the SAA Logo. Sections/Roundtables, although they are within the SAA structure, are not empowered to take action in the name of SAA, or request money in the name of SAA or the Section/Roundtable itself, without specific prior authorization of the Council. This firm rule is required to protect SAA and its members from potential legal complications.

Approved by Council: June 14, 1996
Revised: February 2010

Uniform Guidelines for SAA Websites and Online Communications

Overview

The explosive and continuing growth of electronic communications technology presents SAA with the opportunity to better serve its members and to enhance collaboration between and among internal and external audiences.  SAA establishes these guidelines as a means to encourage the effective development, dissemination, and sharing of resources throughout the Society, to regularize the functions and operations of SAA's component groups, and to otherwise facilitate the efforts of member leaders.  These guidelines apply to the online information resources sponsored and/or maintained by the SAA office and to all websites, e-mail discussion lists, wikis, blogs, document sharing sites, and social networks sponsored and/or maintained by official SAA component groups.

Definitions

SAA network:  The entire collection of websites, e-mail discussion lists, wikis, blogs, document sharing sites, and social networks sponsored and/or maintained by the Society of American Archivists and its component groups.

SAA main website:  The collection of documents maintained by the SAA office residing on its Web server(s) at http://www.archivists.org (a.k.a. the "Extranet") and http://saa.archivists.org (a.k.a. the "Intranet").

SAA content management system (CMS):  The Web database application maintained by the SAA office and used to administer content published to http://www.archivists.org.

SAA list server:  The server application maintained by the SAA office, residing at http://forums.archivists.org, and hosting officially sponsored e-mail discussion lists.

SAA component group website:  A subdirectory of the main website for use by an official component group.

SAA auxiliary site:  An independently hosted website, e-mail discussion list, wiki, blog, document sharing utility, or social network containing content sponsored and/or maintained by teh SAA office or by an official component group.

Guidelines

A.  General Guidelines

Documents published by the SAA Council, by the SAA office, or by any SAA component group are official publications of the Society, whether they are posted to the main website, to a component group website, or to an auxiliary website. As such, these publications are subject to the records retention provisions outlined in Article VII of SAA’s Constitution. Individual comments regarding publications posted by members at large (and/or members of the public) to any portion of the SAA network do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of the Society and are not regarded as SAA publications.

The content of all pages on the SAA website shall be related to the functions and mission of the Society of American Archivists, namely to serve the education and information needs of our members and provide leadership to help ensure the identification, preservation, and use of the nation’s historic record.

The entire SAA network, as defined above, is subject to the SAA Code of Conduct.

B.  SAA Main Website

All documents published to SAA's main website are subject to the approval of the Executive Director.  All submissions and/or suggestions for additions to the SAA main website shall be forwarded for consideration to the Executive Director or the Executive Director's designated staff representative(s).

The Executive Director or designee is responsible for the overall design, coding, formatting, and maintenance of the contents of the SAA main website.  The Executive Director or designee should follow an appropriate style manual, such as the Chicago Manual of Style.

Links should be made from the main website to component group websites and to other professional associations of archivists or allied professions.  Links to external sites comprising directories of archival websites, non-SAA web publications of archival interest, and such also are desirable.  Links will not be made to websites describing individual archival repositories or their holdings.

SAA will maintain links to all auxiliary SAA student chapter websites.

C.  SAA Component Group Websites

A complete list of official component groups will be published by the SAA office on the main website. Each component group will also have a homepage on the main website containing key leadership information, including a statement of the group’s charge and/or purpose, goals and/or duties, group bylaws (if applicable), links to official rosters of the group’s leaders and/or members, a link to the group’s official e-mail discussion list, and a link to the component group website, if applicable.

The SAA office will provide all SAA boards, committees, sections, roundtables, and working groups with a component group website that may be administered by authorized group leaders via SAA’s content management system. Group leaders are responsible for updating information maintained on component group websites. Subcommittees and task forces may also request a component group website, provision of which will be subject to approval by the Executive Director and dependent on the group’s articulation of a clear statement of purpose for the site that is directly germane to the responsibilities and concerns of that group.

Content published to component group websites will follow an appropriate style manual, such as the Chicago Manual of Style. Key leadership information published to the main website should not be republished to component group websites. Personal contact information of members and member leaders, including e-mail addresses, may not be published to any site that is accessible to Web crawlers and/or spam harvesters.

Group leaders will have primary creative control over the design and content of their component group websites, provided that no website may conflict with the SAA main website or with SAA policies and practices relating to publication, privacy and confidentiality, and ethical conduct. Groups are strongly encouraged to utilize the main website theme (e.g., header, footer, site search utility, and navigation elements) in order to promote usability and effective document retrieval. Groups that elect to design and display a custom theme must display:

  • The uniform SAA logo, in accordance with the policies articulated in the Guidelines for Use of the SAA Logo;
  • A prominent link to the component group website and/or the main website;
  • An appropriate disclaimer stating that SAA does not assume responsibility for the opinions and views published on the auxiliary site; and
  • If necessary, an appropriate disclaimer stating that references to commercial interests (such as vendor listings or advertisements) does not imply any endorsement by SAA.

D.  E-mail Discussion Lists

The SAA office will provide all SAA boards, committees, sections, roundtables, and working groups with one or more e-mail discussion lists:

  • Boards, committees, subcommittees, task forces, and working groups will be provided with a private list for use by active members of the component group, the Council liaison, and staff liaisons.
  • Sections and roundtables will be provided with a private list for use by the section and roundtable officers/convener, steering committee members, Council liaison, and staff liaisons.
  • Sections will be supplied with a dual-function announcement list and electronic discussion list. Section members will automatically be subscribed to the announcement function, which section leaders may use for broadcasting official news. Section members may voluntarily modify their list subscriptions to participate in open discussions with other members of the section. Section members may unsubscribe.
  • Roundtables will be supplied with an electronic discussion list to which all roundtable members will automatically be subscribed upon joining the group. Roundtable members may unsubscribe.
  • Active members of SAA boards, committees, subcommittees, task forces, working groups, section steering committees, and roundtable steering committees will automatically be subscribed to the SAA Leader List, a moderated announcement list used by the Executive Director to communicate leadership information to the component groups. Submissions are subject to the approval of the Executive Director.
  • The SAA office will be responsible for managing list software, troubleshooting member subscriptions, and working with officers to maintain accurate subscription lists and policy compliance. As subscriptions to electronic lists will be one of several criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of sections and roundtables, SAA staff will report annually on the number of electronic list subscribers, including those subscribers to roundtable lists who are not members of SAA.

E. SAA Component Group Use of Social Media and External Websites (Auxiliary Sites) [Revised July 2012.]

SAA component groups may create accounts on social networks (such as Facebook and Twitter) and use social media tools (such as wikis, blogs and document-sharing sites). When considering establishing a new resource, component groups should be aware of the alternatives available to them and the associated roles and responsibilities.

SAA’s goals in establishing component group microsites within the Drupal content management system were as follows:

  • To provide component groups with a standardized and easily maintained system that would ensure continuity of the record through leadership changes.
  • To provide SAA members with a highly informative, easy-to-use, and comprehensive website for the Society as a whole.

SAA recognizes, however, that component groups may have needs that cannot be met within the Drupal microsite environment. When this is the case, a component group may make use of other social media tools to accomplish its communication objectives.

Component groups wishing to create or populate an external web resource (including a social media account) must adhere to the following guidelines:

  1. Notify the group’s Council liaison of each social media account or external resource that it creates.
  2. Have a clear understanding of the group’s purpose in establishing the resource and develop a plan for how the resource will be used and what types of material will be shared via the resource.
  3. Maintain on the group’s SAA microsite active links to all such external resources used by the group.
  4. On the microsite list of links to external social media and website resources, identify the active group member serving as the administrator of each account.
  5. Ensure that access privileges (user accounts and passwords) are transferred to new leaders in a timely manner.
  6. Be aware that SAA staff cannot provide support (such as maintenance, training, permissions, or archiving) for resources published on a third-party server.
  7. Maintain key governance information (such as bylaws and minutes) on the group’s SAA microsite where it can be maintained and preserved by SAA.
  8. Be aware that content published on external sites or using social media accounts may be subject to the records retention provisions outlined in Article VII of the SAA Constitution.
  9. Display on external sites a prominent link to the component group’s SAA microsite.
  10. Display on external sites an appropriate disclaimer stating that SAA does not assume responsibility for the opinions and views published on the external site or social media account.

Component groups must display the uniform logo on all social media sites and external websites, in accordance with the policies articulated in Guidelines for Use of the SAA Logo.

These guidelines apply to both new and existing social media accounts and external websites. Component groups should review all existing accounts and websites and discuss them with their Council liaisons to ensure that they comply with these guidelines.

Adopted by the SAA Council:  June 8, 1997; Revised:  March 2007, February 2010, July 2012, July 2014; May 2016

Appendix B. Selected List of Council and Business Meeting Resolutions

SAA Policies, Procedures, and Organizational Matters were published in the American Archivists and may be found online via the MetaPress site.

 

Council Meeting 12/31/37 (The American Archivist 1:2)

Mailing list of the Society considered confidential, but exceptions for professional purposes at discretion of the Secretary

Council Meeting [Spring 1945] (The American Archivist 8:3)

Approved incorporation of the Society

Council Meeting 12/28/55 (The American Archivist 19:2)

Directed the Secretary to control issuance of stationery for committees in order to safeguard against unauthorized use in the name of the Society

Council Meeting 6/12/59 (The American Archivist 22:4)

Clarified its intent that only individual members be eligible for election as Fellows

Council Meeting 12/28/62 (The American Archivist 26:3)

Resolved that Council members are responsible for attending meetings and should resign if absent from two or more meetings in succession without sufficient personal reason

Council Meeting 10/2/63 (The American Archivist 27:1)

Designated Dolores Renze as the Society's archivist

Council Meeting 4/28/66 (The American Archivist 29:3)

Decided that Fellows whose dues are in arrears should retain their standing but not be counted in the 15% eligible for that class of membership, and that only members in good standing would receive The American Archivist and other perquisites of membership

Council Meeting 10/4/66 (The American Archivist 30:1)

Reaffirmed the policy that all candidates should be informed of the sites of future Council meetings, and of the necessity of attending those meetings; Council to retain the prerogative of asking a member to resign if frequently absent

Council Meeting 10/20/67 (The American Archivist 31:1)

Reaffirmed decision not to offer any reduction in price for subscription agencies handling The American Archivist

Council Meeting 12/28/67 (The American Archivist 31:2)

Reaffirmed the policy that solicitations for funds by SAA committees (including proposals for foundations) must receive prior Council approval

Council Meeting 9/29/68 (The American Archivist 32:1)

Recommended that the Society avoid, if possible, the selection of dates for the annual meeting that conflict with religious holidays

Council Meeting 12/30/69 (The American Archivist 33:2)

Changed the Society's archival repository to the University of Wisconsin and requested Dolores Renze to transfer the archives in her possession to Madison

Council Meeting 7/1-2/70 (The American Archivist 33:4)

Refused to endorse products by brand name

Approved a policy regarding SAA sponsorship of symposia, conferences, workshops, and other special meetings

Reiterated its policy that the dates of the annual meeting should not conflict with the Jewish holy days

Council Meeting 10/2/70 (The American Archivist 34:1)

Resolved that SAA officers make general decisions regarding the use of the SAA mailing list but that Council must give specific approval for any financial solicitation of SAA members using this list

Council Meeting 4/17-19/74 (The American Archivist 38:1)

Required that all SAA proposals for external financial support must be approved by Council before submission to funding agencies

Council Meeting 9/30/74 (The American Archivist 38:2)

Authorized Executive Director, in consultation with the Executive Committee, to prepare and submit grant proposals on behalf of the Society

Council Meeting 9/30/75 (The American Archivist 39:2)

Approved guidelines for SAA endorsements of grant projects

Business Meeting 10/1/75 (The American Archivist 39:1)

Prohibited smoking at all official SAA functions

Council Meeting 1/20/76 (The American Archivist 39:3)

Adopted guidelines for the establishment of SAA awards

Council Meeting 10/1/76 (The American Archivist 40:1)

Determined that SAA placement services would be available only to members

Council Meeting 10/4/77 (The American Archivist 41:1)

Voted to open Council meetings to members, with the proviso that Council by 2/3 vote of those present might go into executive session in order to discuss specific agenda items

Directed the Committee on Education and Professional Development to draft procedures for the accreditation of archival education programs

Council Meeting 10/6/77 (The American Archivist 41:1)

Formed a task force to consider extent and implications of current national information systems and to anticipate the role SAA might play in their implementation

Council Meeting 10/2/78 (The American Archivist 42:4)

Accepted offer of University of Wisconsin-Madison to serve as permanent depository of SAA's records

Council Meeting 10/17/82 (The American Archivist 46:2)

Resolved that an advisory committee for a grant-funded project should dissolve upon submission of the project's final report

Council Meeting 5/19-21/84 (The American Archivist 47:4)

Accepted Treasurer's recommendation that the Building Fund and the Endowment Fund be merged to form the Education Endowment Fund, whose interest would be available to further the educational goals of the Society

Business Meeting 9/1/84 (The American Archivist 48:1)

Approved a resolution to add $2 to registration fees for 1985 annual meeting to subsidize child care at the meeting

Urged avoiding scheduling the annual meeting on Saturday and Sunday mornings

Council Meeting 1/25-27/85 (The American Archivist 48:3)

Adopted child care resolution approved by the 1984 Business Meeting

Defeated annual meeting scheduling resolution approved by the 1984 Business Meeting

Created SAA Roundtables

Council Meeting 10/27/85 (The American Archivist 49:2)

Extended child care provisions to apply at 1986 annual meeting

Council Meeting 2/14-16/86 (The American Archivist 53:1)

Resolved that the SAA Representative to NHPRC be recommended by the President and approved by vote of the Council

Council Meeting 1/30-2/1/87 (The American Archivist 50:3)

Resolved that Council members and Officers should not serve as elected or appointed officials on other SAA bodies, "except where this service is specifically mandated"

Council Meeting 6/5-7/87 (The American Archivist 50:3)

Resolved that Officers and members of Council should not concurrently serve as paid employees of SAA, except to complete pre-existing contracts

Council Meeting 2/3-5/89 (The American Archivist 52:3)

Adopted three-year planning cycle for SAA and its constituent groups

Council Meeting 6/2-4/89 (The American Archivist 52:4)

Resolved that Officers and Council members should not serve as officers, steering committee members, or editors of SAA bodies and reaffirmed its position that Officers and Council members should not concurrently serve as paid employees of or contractors to the Society, with the exception that contracts let prior to election may be completed

Directed that the SAA Newsletter should refuse position announcements that are clearly inconsistent with the principles of non-discrimination and intellectual freedom

Council Meeting 10/24/89 (The American Archivist 52:4)

Voted to record names for all divided Council votes

Established a fixed relationship between individual and institutional dues rates

Council Meeting 2/23-25/90 (The American Archivist 54:1)

Adopted three financial goals:

1. That SAA create and maintain a balanced annual budget

2. Analyze and adjust revenue and expenditures in certain program areas as needed

3. Establish an adequate reserve fund

Council Meeting 6/22-24/90 (The American Archivist 53:3)

Adopted proposed rules for future business meetings

Broadened eligibility criteria for Distinguished Service Award

Restated criteria for J Franklin Jameson Archival Advocacy Award

Established Standards Board

Adopted new Bylaw regarding the schedule for sending dues notices

Adopted a proposal that Council review and prepare revisions to the dues structure at least every three years beginning in 1990

Council Meeting 8/29/90 (The American Archivist 54:2)

Voted to discontinue the Candidate Register as a member service

Business Meeting 9/2/90

Adopted a revision to Article IV of the SAA Constitution regarding payment of dues

Adopted new dues structure proposed by Council

Council Meeting 2/22-24/91 (The American Archivist 54:1)

Approved SAA membership in the National Information Standards Organization (NISO)

Modified criteria for Oliver Wendell Holmes Award and Philip M. Hamer and Elizabeth Hamer Kegan Award

Decided to hold a planning day immediately before the upcoming June Council meeting

Adopted modifications to guidelines for Sections and Roundtables

Resolved not to serve as a facilitator for consulting practices of third parties or individuals

Endorsed the publication of a directory of consultants

Established a standing committee to monitor legislative matters

Council Meeting 2/22-24/91 - continued

Endorsed the production of an encyclopedia of archives

Adopted a Statement on Liaison with Other Professional Groups

Council Meeting 6/14-16/91 (The American Archivist 54:3)

Adopted a policy for reimbursing Council members' expenses for attending Council meetings

Resolved that permanent paper be used for SAA publications when feasible

Adopted a process for choosing annual meeting sites

Adopted a set of procedures for grant proposals to be submitted by SAA

Established an Education Office Advisory Board to assist the Education Officer

Council Meeting 9/24/91 (The American Archivist 54:4)

Resolved that Section newsletters are a benefit of SAA membership (which allows individual members a choice of two Section memberships) and will not be offered by subscription to others

Resolved that Council members will purchase new SAA publications rather than receive complimentary copies

Adopted guidelines and a schedule for orienting new Council members

Adopted revisions to the guidelines for Committees, Sections, and Roundtables clarifying the policy regarding seeking funds from outside sources

Business Meeting 9/26/91

Adopted revisions to Article XI of the SAA Constitution regarding publications received in right of membership

Council Meeting 9/29/91 (The American Archivist 54:4)

Resolved that the current list of manuscript appraisers continue to be distributed by the SAA office at no charge while the new consultant directory is phased in

Council Meeting 1/24-26/92 (The American Archivist 55:2)

Approved an upgrade of the office computer system and resolved to review it within three year

Adopted a policy on payment for childcare at Annual Meetings

Adopted a policy on SAA support for various groups that meet at the SAA Annual Meeting

Amended the bylaws to add an additional elected Fellow to the Committee to Select SAA Fellows

Adopted an amendment to Article V of the Constitution regarding criteria for selection of Fellows

Council Meeting 6/12-14/92 (The American Archivist 55:3)

Established the position of intern on Standing Committees, Boards, Task Forces

Adopted a revised policy on choosing Annual Meeting sites

Affirmed that employment opportunities will appear only in the SAA Newsletter and the Employment Bulletin, not in any other newsletters of the Society

Resolved that officers and Council members shall not serve on SAA bodies

Decided to send Requests for Proposals to several association management firms

Council Meeting 9/12-17/92 (The American Archivist 55:4)

Voted to discontinue investigating association management firms

Established a Task Force on Sections and Roundtables

Business Meeting 9/16/92

Adopted an amendment to Article V of the SAA Constitution regarding criteria for selection of Fellows

Council Meeting 1/29-31/93 (The American Archivist 56:2)

Established a committee to conduct Executive Director Search

Adopted guidelines for childcare at the Annual Meetings

Established student chapters as a new structure within SAA

Established an award for publications on preservation

Council Meeting 6/11-13/93 (The American Archivist 56:4)

Decided to protect the SAA logo by registering it as a trademark

Council Meeting 8/31-9/4/93 (The American Archivist 56:4)

Established an award to support minority student attendance at the annual meeting.

Council Meeting 1/5-6/94

Established a mentoring program to assist new members

Established a separate Editorial Board for the American Archivist

Established an Electronic Records Section; dissolved the Committee on Automated Records and Techniques; established two task forces to recommend ways for the Society to address electronic records and automated techniques issues

Council Meeting 9/6-11/94

Passed a resolution regarding "Annual Meeting Conflict with Religious Holidays"

Passed a resolution authorizing funds for a staff retirement plan to be incorporated into the adoption of the annual budget


SAA and the Wider Profession

Council Meeting 10/24-25/38 (The American Archivist 2:2)

President to appoint and chair a committee on uniform state legislation concerning archives

Council Meeting 10/13/39 (The American Archivist 3:1)

Continued for another year the Committee on Uniform State Legislation and empowered it to submit a draft for a uniform public records law to the Committee on Scope and Program of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws

Council Meeting 9/15/53 (The American Archivist 17:4)

Established a committee to examine and report on professional qualifications for archival work

Council Meeting 10/10/56 (The American Archivist 20:1)

Accepted in principle the President's report suggesting a national program "to insure the care and preservation of our archival heritage"

Council Meeting 10/7/60 (The American Archivist 24:2)

Resolved that Council should not intervene in professional dismissals except on written request of aggrieved member, with the matter to be referred to Committee on Professional Standards

Council Meeting 5/10/62 (The American Archivist 25:4)

Adopted policy statement on education and training of archivists

Council Meeting 4/23/65 (The American Archivist 28:3)

Requested President to ask Committee on Education and Training to consider SAA sponsorship of archival courses and the feasibility of certification of teachers of these courses

Council Meeting 10/4/66 (The American Archivist 30:1)

Endorsed the Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure of the American Association of University Professors

Council Meeting 12/28/66 (The American Archivist 30:2)

Approved a limited salary survey every two years, with comprehensive surveys to be completed every four or five years at the discretion of Council

Asked the Committee on Education and Professional Development to review the implications of its proposal that SAA accredit archival courses in colleges and universities, but encouraged it to proceed to compile a syllabus for use in introductory courses in archival management

Council Meeting 4/27/67 (The American Archivist 30:4)

Responding to a proposal that a separate organization for manuscript administrators be established, reiterated its policy opposing attempts to splinter the archival profession

Council Meeting 4/18/68 (The American Archivist 31:3)

Endorsed a proposal that the National Archives: conduct research and develop test methods dealing with the chemical stability of archival paper and related materials; develop specifications for these materials; and determine proper environmental conditions for archival paper records; established a Committee on Paper Research to cooperate in this endeavor

Council Meeting 4/5/72 (The American Archivist 35:3-4)

Expressed concern about ecological matters but also viewed with concern the use of recycled paper.

Council Meeting 12/28/72 (The American Archivist 36:2)

Approved resolution concerning the declassification of government records

Council Meeting 4/13/73 (The American Archivist 36:4)

Accepted a resolution on discrimination in the archival profession for presentation to business meeting

Business Meeting 9/27/73 (The American Archivist 37:1)

Resolved that SAA and its affiliated institutions are committed to eliminating discrimination in employment throughout the archival profession

Council Meeting 12/29/73 (The American Archivist 37:2)

Passed resolution supporting National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections

Council Meeting 12/30/73 (The American Archivist 37:2)

Passed resolution urging a reduction in the time period before national security documents are declassified and recommending automatic declassification of all except the most highly sensitive ten years after their creation

Business Meeting 10/2/74 (The American Archivist 38:2)

Adopted resolution on public ownership of official records of elected or appointed public officials

Council Meeting 10/4/74 (The American Archivist 38:2)

Passed resolution expanding on business meeting's resolution regarding the public ownership of the official records of elected or appointed public officials and discussing policies on such ownership

Council Meeting 4/8/77 (The American Archivist 41:2)

Authorized publication of draft proposal and creation of formal procedures concerning certification of archivists and accreditation of archival training programs

Council Meeting 10/5/77 (The American Archivist 41:1)

Authorized Committee on Replevin to study implications of North Carolina decision on replevin

Council Meeting 10/6/78 (The American Archivist 42:2)

Gave highest priority to evaluation of archival education programs, as opposed to individual certification and institutional evaluation

Council Meeting 9/28/79 (The American Archivist 43:2)

Endorsed objectives of Joint AAM/AASLH/SAA Committee on Minority Training and Employment: to determine extent of training and employment and to develop plans to encourage greater participation of minorities; approved recommendation that possible sources of private funding for the Committee's work be explored

Council Meeting 10/3/80 (The American Archivist 44:3)

Approved resolution objecting to "Guidelines for Library Functions at the State Level," prepared by the Chief Officers of State Library Agencies

Council Meeting 1/24-26/81 (The American Archivist 44:4)

Passed resolution supporting Native American Archives Project

Council Meeting 9/4/81 (The American Archivist 45:2)

Urged archival facility, at an appropriate site, for research into records of Nixon Administration

Council Meeting 8/29/84 (The American Archivist 48:2)

Asked ALA/SAA Joint Committee to explore ongoing collaboration to recognize archives as well as libraries during National Library Week and International Archives Week

Council Meeting 9/2/84 (The American Archivist 48:2)

Supported NAGARA activities to encourage a congressional initiative to conserve archival records

Council Meeting 1/25-27/85 (The American Archivist 48:3)

Identified certain qualities that an Archivist of the United States should possess

Supported Women's History Week

Council Meeting 6/7-9/85 (The American Archivist 49:1)

Expressed concern about the potential impact on archives of a reorganization at the National Endowment for the Humanities

Council Meeting 10/27/85 (The American Archivist 49:2)

Endorsed the concept of a National Congress on Historical Records to commemorate the bicentennial of the United States Constitution

Council Meeting 8/25/86 (The American Archivist 50:1)

Endorsed legislation proposing a White House Conference on Libraries and Information Services and recommended that the conference explore the relationship between records and the themes of democracy, productivity, and literacy

Council Meeting 1/30-2/1/87 (The American Archivist 50:3)

Established an Interim Board for Certification to implement certification and recertification of archivists

Council Meeting 9/1/87 (The American Archivist 51:1-2)

Subject to clarification, endorsed concept of a Documentary Heritage Trust

Council Meeting 2/26-27/88 (The American Archivist 51:3)

Directed the Interim Board for Certification to implement the plan that it devised

Council Meeting 9/27/88 (The American Archivist 52:2)

Accepted "An Action Agenda for the Archival Profession," prepared by the Committee on Goals and Priorities

Council Meeting 6/2-4/89 (The American Archivist 52:4)

Endorsed the concept of "entitled" graduate education programs

Council Meeting 10/24/89 (The American Archivist 52:4)

Endorsed a Senate resolution on permanent paper

Council Meeting 10/28/89 (The American Archivist 52:4)

Endorsed in principle a nationwide archival preservation policy

Council Meeting 6/22-24/90 (The American Archivist 53:3)

Adopted a policy statement on the closing of an archives

Council Meeting 9/12/92 (The American Archivist 55:4)

Adopted a revised Code of Ethics for Archivists

Business Meeting 9/3/92

Adopted a resolution in support of continued open access to graduate dissertations and theses.

Council Meeting 1/5-6/94

Adopted guidelines for the evaluation of archival institutions


SAA and Other Institutions and Organizations

Secretary's Report 10/24-25/38 (The American Archivist 2:1)

Encouraged the gathering of local groups but requested that their organizers inform the Secretary of their plans and activities

Council Meeting 3/20/55 (The American Archivist 18:3)

Resolved approval of archives courses at American University and urged administrators to consider its graduates

Council Meeting 5/22/58 (The American Archivist 21:4)

Agreed in principle to participate in the work of the American Standards Association's Sectional Committee in the field of library work and documentation ("Z39")

Council Meeting 12/28/65 (The American Archivist 29:2)

Recommended Robert Bahmer as Archivist of the United States

Council Meeting 4/27/67 (The American Archivist 30:4)

Approved procedures governing the Joint Committee on the Status of the National Archives

Council Meeting 10/18/67 (The American Archivist 31:1)

Directed the Secretary to explore joint meetings with AASLH and other professional organizations

Council Meeting 12/28/67 (The American Archivist 31:2)

Endorsed a statement dealing with the importance and independence of the National Archives

Continued the Joint Committee on the Status of the National Archives

Council Meeting 4/18/68 (The American Archivist 31:3)

Endorsed James B. Rhoads for Archivist of the United States

Council Meeting 9/29/68 (The American Archivist 32:1)

Did not approve a proposal, from the Society of Ohio Archivists, for the creation of state or regional chapters, and for SAA to collect dues for local chapters

Urged strengthening of and autonomy for the National Archives

Council Meeting 10/2/68 (The American Archivist 32:1)

Registered approbation of the formation of the Society of Ohio Archivists

Council Meeting 12/29/68 (The American Archivist 32:2)

Urged the incoming President of the United States to retain the incumbent Archivist of the United States

Council Meeting 12/30/69 (The American Archivist 33:2)

Expressed concern regarding charges by Professor Lowenheim regarding unethical conduct by the Roosevelt Library, offered to cooperate with AHA and OAH in an investigation of these charges, and created an ad hoc committee to study professional ethics

Council Meeting 7/1-2/70 (The American Archivist 33:4)

Disagreed with the AHA-OAH committee investigating the Lowenheim matter regarding the involvement of archivists in the investigation and emphasized the need for such involvement

Council Meeting 9/29/70 (The American Archivist 34:1)

Accepted an invitation from ALA to create a joint committee but specified that the chair should alternate between the two organizations

Urged that the joint AHA-OAH report on the Lowenheim matter be made public as soon as possible

Council Meeting 12/29/70 (The American Archivist 34:2)

Voted to explore creation of a joint standing committee, drawn from AHA, OAH, and SAA, in order to relieve growing misunderstanding and tension between historians and archivists

Council Meeting 10/15/71 (The American Archivist 35:1)

Voted to ask Congress to increase appropriations for NHPRC

Council Meeting 10/30/72 (The American Archivist 36:2)

Endorsed the suggestion of the Committee for the 1970s that SAA establish closer relationships with local archival organizations

Council Meeting 12/28/72 (The American Archivist 36:2)

Approved revised guidelines, submitted by the Joint AHA/OAH/SAA Committee on Historians and Archivists, for the adjudication of disputes between historians and archivists

Council Meeting 10/3/75 (The American Archivist 39:2)

Endorsed independent status for the National Archives

Council Meeting 4/9/76 (The American Archivist 40:1)

Accepted an invitation from the Institute of Certified Records Managers to sponsor program and to designate a member of the Board of Regents

Council Meeting 10/1/76 (The American Archivist 40:1)

Adopted resolution supporting re-establishment of National Archives as independent authority, appointment of archivists based on professional criteria, and creation of a governing board to oversee programs of National Archives

Approved SAA participation in ARMA/SAA joint committee, with three SAA members having two-year terms (renewable once)

Council Meeting 10/5/77 (The American Archivist 41:1)

Approved resolution urging the Governor, Legislature, and State Historical Board of Iowa to establish a state archivist and provide for a state archives building that meets adequate standards

Council Meeting 4/14/78 (The American Archivist 42:1)

Authorized liaison between SAA and NAGARA

Authorized application for membership in ACLS

Council Meeting 4/24/79 (The American Archivist 42:4)

Accepted invitation to designate a representative to a working group to revise the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules

Urged Congress to approve a new facility for the National Archives

Business Meeting 9/26/79 (The American Archivist 43:1)

Deplored prospective termination of West Virginia Division of Archives and History

Council Meeting 1/28/80 (The American Archivist 43:3)

Passed resolution calling for qualified and independent Archivist of the United States and for preserving the integrity of our national documentary heritage through the consistent application of the principles of the archival profession

Council Meeting 1/23-25/82 (The American Archivist 45:2)

Urged comprehensive oversight hearings on program activity and management of the National Archives and Records Services, with no reorganization by the General Services Administration until the hearings could be completed and Congress could make program decisions

Council Meeting 10/22/82 (The American Archivist 46:2)

Urged the Office of Personnel Management to amend proposed standards to emphasize academic training as a basic requirement for archivists within the National Archives and Records Service

Council Meeting 1/22-23/83 (The American Archivist 46:3)

Passed a resolution deploring a threat to the PBS archives

Council Meeting 10/27/85 (The American Archivist 49:2)

Encouraged coordination with State Historical Records Coordinators Steering Committee in the development of a statement outlining elements of a national historical records program

Council Meeting 6/13-15/86 (The American Archivist 50:1)

Decided to apply for membership in the Library of Congress Network Advisory Committee

Approved a resolution opposing the nomination of John Agresto as Archivist of the United States

Business Meeting 8/28/86 (The American Archivist 49:4)

Opposed nomination of John Agresto as Archivist of the United States

Council Meeting 9/1/87 (The American Archivist 51:1-2)

Voted to have SAA join the Archives and Records Information Coalition

Council Meeting 6/10-12/88 (The American Archivist 51:4)

Encouraged closer affiliation with American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works

Council Meeting 10/28/89 (The American Archivist 52:4)

Approved creation of a joint committee with the Association of Records Managers and Administrators

Council Meeting 6/22-24/90 (The American Archivist 53:3)

Adopted a position paper on the leadership role of the National Archives and Records Administration

Council Meeting 2/22-24/91 (The American Archivist 54:1)

Agreed to jointly sponsor with ALA an award to the developers of neutral sizing

Declined to join the National History Education Network

Council Meeting 6/15/91 (The American Archivist 54:3)

Approved membership in the National Information Standards Organization

Business Meeting 9/26/91

Adopted a resolution opposing the closing of the Colorado State Archives

Business Meeting 9/16/92

Adopted a resolution in support of reauthorization for the National Historical Publications and Records Commission

Council Meeting 9/17/92 (The American Archivist 55:4)

Established an official representative to the Bureau of Canadian Archives Committee on Descriptive Standards

Council Meeting 1/29-31/93 (The American Archivist 56:2)

Adopted resolutions on the National Archives and Records Administration calling for : authorization legislation, increased support, and an advisory board

Council Meeting 6/11-13/93 (The American Archivist 56:4)

Adopted a resolution supporting the Library of Congress in keeping open the Thurgood Marshall Papers

Council Meeting 1/5-6/94

Approved SAA's participation in ALA's federated process for accrediting graduate programs


SAA and International Affairs

Business Meeting 10/25/46 (The American Archivist 10:1)

Adopted resolution urging creation of the International Archives Council and authorized President to bring about its establishment

Recommended that the United Nations establish an effective international archival agency with an adequate staff of professionally competent archivists

Business Meeting 9/4/47 (The American Archivist 11:1)

Recorded the special concern of the Society in the continued and expanded interest of UNESCO in archival work

Special Business Meeting 10/29/48 (The American Archivist 12:1)

Voted two-year financial support (including both SAA and voluntary contributions by members) of the International Council on Archives

Business Meeting 9/20/49 (The American Archivist 13:1)

Voted to continue financial support of the International Council on Archives

Council Meeting 4/28/66 (The American Archivist 29:3)

Resolved that the Archivist of the United States should represent the United States in voting on resolutions presented at the Extraordinary Congress of the International Council on Archives

Council Meeting 10/8/66 (The American Archivist 30:1)

Urged the United States delegation to UNESCO to support an increase in financial support for the International Council on Archives

Council Meeting 10/22/82 (The American Archivist 46:2)

Called to the attention of the International Council on Archives the situation concerning the archives of the research center of the Palestine Liberation Organization

Approved a resolution calling for the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. to agree to limit nuclear testing and stockpiles

Council Meeting 5/19-21/84 (The American Archivist 47:4)

Urged continuing U.S. support for UNESCO's Records and Archives Management Program, and similar programs of assistance to archives and information programs in developing nations

Council Meeting 9/2/84 (The American Archivist 48:2)

Noted with concern the fate of the cultural records of the Grenadian Government

Council Meeting 6/11-13/93 (The American Archivist 56:4)

Urged governments around the world to provide timely and equitable access to their records